You are looking at  1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • Publisher or Printer x
  • Painting and Drawing x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
Clear All

Article

David Blayney Brown

(b London, c. 1758; d Byfleet, Surrey, June 4, 1834).

Miniature painter and publisher. He was originally self-taught and then a pupil of John Smart (1741–1811), whose work he copied and whose style he imitated: between 1783 and 1828 he was an occasional exhibitor at the Royal Academy, being appointed in 1789 painter in watercolours to George III and miniature painter to Queen Charlotte (1744–1818). He was a keen promoter of history painting and in 1792 launched a prospectus for an edition of David Hume’s History of England, to be ‘superbly embellished’ with illustrations engraved after historical paintings by leading artists, including Benjamin West, Robert Smirke, Francis Wheatley and Philippe-Jacques de Loutherbourg. Bowyer also published the Historic Gallery, which, until its failure, with great financial loss, in 1806, provided substantial patronage to history painters and fostered a taste for national history paintings, especially of medieval subjects. The five folios that appeared contained, in addition to engravings of historical paintings, engraved portraits, manuscripts and antiquarian material. Bowyer also published ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1772, in Nantes; died 1817, in Paris.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching/burin), print publisher.

Alexis Chataigner, a pupil of François-Marie Queverdo, was one of the most prolific engravers of the Revolution and the Empire.

Paris, 14 Dec 1935: The Husband's Departure...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Versailles.

Draughtsman, engraver (burin), print publisher.

Article

Article

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1732, in Perugia; died before 15 December 1810, in Perugia, where he was buried on that date, in S Teresa.

Painter, decorative designer, print publisher. Historical subjects. Church decoration.

A pupil of Fr. Busti, Orsini continued his training in Rome with Masucci and Capriozzi. He became the director of the academy of Perugia and executed many of the chancel pictures in the cathedral of Perugia....

Article

Gode Krämer and Roberto Pontual

German family of painters, draughtsmen, and engravers. (1) Georg Philipp Rugendas I, an esteemed painter and graphic artist in Augsburg, established a print publishing house there in 1735. His sons Georg Philipp Rugendas II (1701–74), Christian Rugendas (1708–81), and Jeremias Gottlob Rugendas (1710–72) helped with this business, as did their descendants, including Georg Philipp II’s grandson, the engraver Johann Lorenz Rugendas II (1775–1826). (2) Johann Moritz Rugendas, the son of Johann Lorenz II, was noted particularly for his drawings and paintings of Brazil and other Latin American countries.

(b Augsburg, Nov 27, 1666; d Augsburg, May 9, 1742).

His father, a watchmaker, trained him in copper engraving, but after a fistula on his right hand forced him to abandon this he was apprenticed (...

Article

Geoffrey Ashton

(b Derby, 1752; d Doncaster, March 2, 1812).

English printmaker, publisher and painter. The youngest son of the landscape artist Thomas Smith of Derby (d Bristol, 12 Sept 1767), he was apprenticed to a linen draper at the age of ten and around 1767 became a linen draper’s assistant in London. He seems to have taught himself to paint miniatures and produced his first mezzotint in 1769, from Henry Benbridge’s portrait of General Pascal Paoli (San Francisco, CA Pal. Legion of Honor). Smith married and opened a draper’s shop in Exeter Exchange; about 1773 he began to engrave professionally and sold prints from the same shop.

Smith exhibited mezzotints at the Society of Artists from 1773 to 1777, most of which were copied from paintings by Royal Academicians. He was one of the most refined mezzotint engravers of the late 18th century; many of his plates, such as the Gower Family (1781) after George Romney or ...