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Nathalie Volle

(b Laon, March 5, 1743; d Paris, March 1, 1811).

French painter and draughtsman. In 1764 he entered the studio of Noël Hallé, whose work strongly influenced his early paintings. Alexander Cutting the Gordian Knot (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.), with which he won the Prix de Rome in 1767, is a brilliant exercise in the grand academic style as conceived by the followers of François Boucher. After a period at the Ecole Royale des Elèves Protégés he completed his training at the Académie de France in Rome from 1771 to 1774. Although he impressed the then director of the Académie, Charles-Joseph Natoire, and formed friendships with the painters François-Guillaume Ménageot, François-André Vincent and Joseph-Benoît Suvée and the architects Pierre-Adrien Pâris and Jean-Jacques-Marie Huvé (1742–1808), his artistic activity during his years in Rome is obscure. A number of spectacular drawings in red chalk, such as those of the Villa d’Este, Tivoli (Orléans, Mus. B.-A.) and the Villa Colonna and Villa Negroni...

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 December 1771, in London; died 1843, in Devon, in a lunatic asylum.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman, architect. Religious subjects, landscapes, architectural views.

Romanticism.

Joseph Michael Gandy studied architecture at the Royal Academy of Art. He was sent on a study trip to Rome but returned to London in ...

Article

Hans-Christoph Dittscheid

(b Kassel, Dec 9, 1754; d Kassel, July 26, 1825).

German architect. He studied architecture from 1778 at the Collegium Carolinum in Kassel under Simon Louis Du Ry. His earliest surviving designs show a close allegiance to the architecture of the Prussian court in Berlin and Potsdam. At about this time he taught architecture under Du Ry. In 1783 Jussow received a bursary from Landgrave Frederick II of Hesse-Kassel (reg 1760–85), which enabled him to stay in Paris until 1785. There he was a pupil of Charles de Wailly, who had produced various designs for a new residential palace and a pleasure palace, both at Weissenstein (later Wilhelmshöhe), for the Kassel court. In de Wailly’s studio Jussow drew up his first scheme for Schloss Wilhelmshöhe, which exhibits the direct influence of Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, who was also working on projects for Landgrave Frederick at the time. Jussow also spent a year in Italy (1785–6) and was one of the first German architects to study and draw the ancient temples at Paestum. Landgrave ...

Article

Geoffrey C. Tyack

(b London, 1752; d E. Cowes, Isle of Wight, May 13, 1835).

English architect and urban planner. Immensely prolific, he enjoyed the patronage of George IV, and the architecture of the Regency period is particularly associated with his work. He followed the ideas of the Picturesque movement and produced some of its best-known and most influential architectural effects at Blaise Hamlet, near Bristol, the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, and Regents Park and Regent Street, London.

Nash was the son of a Lambeth millwright and came from a family of Welsh origins. He spent some time in the office of Robert Taylor in London before setting up practice as a speculative builder and architect in 1774 or 1775. In 1777–8 he designed and built a pair of palazzo-fronted houses in Bloomsbury Square, London (Nos 16–17: now the German Historical institute), and an adjoining row of smaller houses in Great Russell Street, into one of which he moved. These houses were notable for their precocious use of stucco, but the speculation failed, and, following the collapse of a disastrous first marriage, Nash went bankrupt in ...

Article

Roberta J. M. Olson

(b Bologna, 15 May ?1775–7; d Turin, March 6, 1860).

Italian painter, architect, designer and collector. At the age of 12 he began to frequent the house in Bologna of his patron Conte Carlo Filippo Aldrovandi Marescotti (1763–1823), whose collections and library provided his early artistic education and engendered his taste for collecting. From 1795 he worked on several decorative schemes with the theatre designer and decorator Antonio Basoli (1774–1848), and it was perhaps in theatre designs that Palagi was first exposed to an eclectic range of motifs from exotic cultures. He was influenced by the linear, mannered style of Felice Giani, with whom he frequented the important evening drawing sessions at the house of the engraver Francesco Rosaspina (1762–1841). Beginning in 1802, he participated in the informal Accademia della Pace, Bologna, as well as studying at the Accademia Clementina, and was elected to the Accademia Nazionale di Belle Arti of Bologna in 1803...