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Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 18th century.

Engraver, print publisher.

Pieter Boudewyn van der Aa worked in Leiden from 1700 to 1750. He was both an artist and a businessman and published a number of catalogues for his business, notably in ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 23 October 1723, in Paris; died 12 June 1797.

Engraver (burin/etching), print dealer.

Basan had Jean Dauillé and Étienne Fessard as masters. He engraved a large number of prints and specialised in publishing engravings. He employed a succession of artists in his house and, with their assistance, published a considerable number of pieces (more than 550 between 1761 and 1799), which are in general purely commercial productions. In 1770, he published the statesman Choiseul's art collection, and then Poullain's in 1781. He also published magnificently illustrated books, including Ovid's ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Engraver, print publisher.

Basset the Elder lived in Paris, on the Rue St-Jacques, and was associated with Françoise Basset. He published a large number of anonymous plates, and also plates by engravers such as Alexis, Blanchard, Fortier, Gabriel, Gatine, Jubin, Rubières and Thiebault. Basset the Elder could be the same as the engraver André Basset mentioned by Heinecken....

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Died before 17 August 1775.

Engraver, print dealer.

Antoine Basset is known to have executed a Return from Egypt after Rubens.

Article

French, 18th century, female.

Active in Paris between 1785 and 1792.

Engraver, print publisher.

Article

Véronique Meyer

French family of printmakers and print-publishers. Jacques-Firmin Beauvarlet (b Abbeville, 25 Sept 1731; d Paris, 7 Dec 1797) was an etcher, engraver and print-publisher. He came to Paris in 1750 and trained in turn with Robert Hecquet (1693–1775), Charles Dupuis and Laurent Cars. In 1762 he was appointed Graveur du Roi and in the same year was approved (agréé) by the Académie Royale, although he was not made a member (reçu) until 1776; his morceau de réception was a portrait of Edme Bouchardon after the painting by François-Hubert Drouais (Paris, Louvre). In 1761 Beauvarlet married Catherine-Françoise Deschamps (b Paris, 1737; d Paris, 7 July 1769), an engraver and etcher. Her small body of work (around 15 pieces) was mostly published by her husband between 1761 and 1769. She engraved genre scenes after Greuze, such as the Coal Merchant and the ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Born 25 September 1731, in Abbeville; died 7 December 1797, in Abbeville.

Draughtsman, engraver (etching/burin), print publisher.

He came to Paris when he was very young, and trained with Charles Dupuis and Laurent Cars. He quickly earned a reputation as a skilled engraver. His work is characterised by fine, fluid, deft strokes of the burin. He was granted the title of Engraver to the King and, on ...

Article

Dutch, 18th century, female.

Active in The Hague at the beginning of the 18th century.

Engraver (burin), print publisher.

Article

18th century, male.

Engraver, print publisher.

Credited with a portrait of Jobst Vondel.

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 15 April 1748, in Nuremberg; died 26 February 1812, in Frankfurt am Main.

Engraver, print publisher.

Johann Christian Berndt settled in Frankfurt am Main in 1775, and was granted citizenship there in 1780. He was a pupil of his father and of Preissler, and completed his studies in Leipzig with Oeser and Stock. He then worked in Vienna and Würzburg with his brother Johann Oswald (born around ...

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Active in England, at the end of the 18th century.

Engraver (mezzotint), print publisher.

J. Berry's Grim-all-Day at Breakfast of 1783 is mentioned by Le Blanc.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active towards the end of the 18th century.

Engraver, print publisher.

Louis Berthet was active in Paris, engraving portraits and genre scenes. Most of his engravings were after Binet, and were made for illustrating books (for example seven engravings for Contemporary Women...

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Active in London in 1752.

Engraver, print publisher.

John Bickham was related to George Bickham.

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Active in London.

Engraver, print publisher.

Article

German, 18th century, male.

Active in Nuremberg in 1725.

Engraver (burin), print publisher.

Le Blanc mentions Johann Leonhard Blancken's Portraits of Famous Artists.

Article

French, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active in Paris.

Baptised in 1642 in Paris; died 13 November 1711, in Paris.

Engraver, print publisher.

Made a member of the Académie de St-Luc in Paris in 1671. He was the son of a printer of the same name, and brother of Nicolas, Jean-Baptiste and Robert Bonnart....

Article

Christian Michel

(b Paris, 1736; d Saint-Mandé, nr Paris, Oct 20, 1793).

French engraver and publisher. He came from a family of artisans and owed his training in engraving to his brother-in-law, the engraver Louis Legrand (1723–1808). Through Legrand, Bonnet became the pupil of Jean-Charles François in 1756, a year before the latter discovered the Crayon manner technique of engraving, designed to reproduce the effect of a coloured-chalk drawing. Around the end of 1757 Bonnet used the new technique to engrave a Cupid (see Hérold, no. 2A) after François Eisen. Gilles Demarteau, a rival of Jean-Charles François, enticed Bonnet to join his workshop and learnt the technique from him.

Bonnet engraved some 15 plates for Demarteau, and in 1760 he set up his own shop. During this period he strove to perfect the crayon manner by producing prints using several different plates, each inked with a different colour. Initially, he tried to reproduce drawings executed in black and white chalk on blue or buff paper; to do this he had to make a white ink that would not yellow with age. He was the first to use points of reference to print several plates one on top of the other. In ...

Article

British, 18th century, male.

Died 1799.

Engraver, print publisher.

Henry Bryer was a pupil and then associate of Wynne Ryland. He was in Cornhill towards the end of the 18th century. He exhibited at the Society of Artists from 1765 to 1774.

He engraved a number of plates after Angelica Kauffmann. Other works include ...

Article

David Alexander

[Antoine]

(b Brussels, May 15, 1772; d London, April 16, 1813).

Flemish engraver and print publisher, active in London. The son of Antoine Alexandre Joseph Cardon (1739–1822), a painter and engraver in Brussels, he was persuaded by the troubled times to go to London in 1792. He entered the Royal Academy Schools on 3 November 1792 and was engaged by Paul Colnaghi to engrave, under the direction of Luigi Schiavonetti, three of the Cries of London after Francis Wheatley in 1794–6. Cardon was an enterprising man, soon establishing himself as an independent publisher. He took advantage of the peace of 1801, in that year engraving and publishing in Paris and London Joseph Boze’s painting of The First Consul and General Berthier at the Battle of Marengo (untraced) jointly with the painter. He was known to Joseph Farington, who noted some of his activities, such as his purchase of two paintings by Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg for engraving (4 March 1805...

Article

Véronique Meyer

(b Lyon, May 28, 1699; d Paris, April 14, 1771).

French printmaker, print publisher and print-seller. Early in his life his family removed to Paris. His father, Jean-François Cars (1661–1730), an engraver and publisher, was his first teacher. He next studied painting under Joseph Christophe (1662–1748) and François Lemoyne and then completed his studies in engraving under Nicolas-Henry Tardieu. In 1729 he was approved (agréé) by the Académie Royale and on 31 December 1733 was received (reçu), on presentation of the engraved portraits of Michel Anguier after Gabriel Revel and of Sébastien Bourdon after Hyacinthe Rigaud. From 1750 he gradually abandoned engraving in favour of print-selling, particularly those of his father’s collection. In 1757 he was appointed a Conseiller. His work included nearly 190 prints; he engraved portraits, historical and mythological subjects after Lemoyne, such as Hercules and Omphale and the Bath of Iris, and genre subjects after Watteau, such as Figures de différents caractères...