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Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 28 April 1845, in Rouen; died September 1909, in Rouen.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator, architect, art writer.

Jules Adeline was a first-time exhibitor at the Paris Salon in 1873, when, as a young architect, he initially contributed sketches and architectural projects. From ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 30 May 1855, in Bordeaux; died 12 November 1933, in Caudéran (Bordeaux).

Painter, illustrator. Architectural views.

Daniel Alaux was the grandson of Jean-Paul Alaux, otherwise known as Gentil. He studied under Pierre Victor Galland, and later Léon Bonnat at the École des Beaux-Arts de Paris ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Born 13 March 1804, in London; died 21 October 1872, in Barnes.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, architect. Landscapes with figures.

Thomas Allom studied architecture under Francis Goodwin and collaborated with him on various projects in towns throughout England. In 1834, he started drafting plans for the Houses of Parliament; these were engraved on the express instructions of the House of Commons....

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1752; died 1821.

Engraver, draughtsman, illustrator. Portraits, architectural views, topographical views.

William Angus studied under William Walker and went on to produce a large number of well-executed and pleasing prints of manor houses and family seats in England and Wales. Angus worked as an illustrator and was retained by various topographical publishers of the day. He engraved from his own drawings but also from originals by Shothard, Paul Sandby, Edward Daynes, George Samuel and other leading artists. He is remembered for a series of plates for ...

Article

Michèle Lavallée

[Fr.: ‘new art’]

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed.

Art Nouveau has been held to have had its beginnings in 1894 or 1895. A more appropriate date would be 1884, the year the progressive group Les XX was founded in Belgium, and the term was used in the periodical that supported it, Art Moderne: ‘we are believers in Art Nouveau’. The origin of the name is usually attributed to ...

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

Anne Pastori Zumbach

(b Lausanne, Aug 18, 1872; d Lausanne, Oct 11, 1957).

Swiss draughtsman, painter and illustrator. He began his career as an apprentice banker but abandoned this to study music and languages in Dresden, and then painting at the South Kensington School of Art, London (1895). In 1896 he went to Paris where he took courses in anatomy and became the pupil of Luc Olivier Merson and possibly of Whistler. In 1897 he entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts but continued to frequent Merson’s studio. At the end of 1899, after a short stay in Bavaria, Auberjonois went to Florence, where he passed several months studying and copying the paintings of the Old Masters and painting the Tuscan landscape. Returning to Paris in 1901, he began to work independently, exhibiting for the first time at the Salon in Paris and at the Exposition Nationale Suisse des Beaux-Arts in Vevey. From 1901 to World War I he lived alternately in Paris and in Switzerland....

Article

British, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1754, in Norwich, baptised 5 June 1754; died 21 or 6 December 1828, in Hatfield, in very reduced circumstances.

Engraver (etching and stippling), illustrator, printmaker, draughtsman. Portraits, architecture, mythology, religious subjects.

The son of John Baldrey the Elder, John Baldrey the Younger entered the Royal Academy School to study engraving in ...

Article

British, 19th century, male.

Activec.1890.

Engraver (etching), draughtsman, illustrator. Topographical views, architectural views, urban landscapes.

Charles Barrett illustrated topographical works in pen and went on to publish Essex, the first edition of which carried 99 illustrations and 13 etchings and the second 128 illustrations and 13 etchings; then ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 4 April 1872, in London; died 10 July 1953, in London.

Sculptor, copyist. Architectural monuments.

Gilbert Bayes was the son of Albert Walter Bayes and the brother of Jessie and Walter Bayes. He exhibited two wax work models at the Royal Academy in ...

Article

Simon Wilson and Lin Barton

(Vincent )

(b Brighton, Aug 21, 1872; d Menton, March 16, 1898).

English draughtsman and writer. He was brought up in Brighton, in genteel poverty, by his mother. She gave her children an intensive education in music and books, and by the time he was sent to boarding-school at the age of seven Beardsley was exceptionally literate and something of a musical prodigy. He was also already infected with the tuberculosis that eventually killed him. There is evidence that his talent for drawing was highly developed by the age of ten, and he was subsequently encouraged by his housemaster at Brighton Grammar School, Arthur William King. Beardsley left school at the end of 1888, and in January 1889 became a clerk at the Guardian Life and Fire Insurance Company in the City of London. Attacks of haemorrhaging of the lungs forced him to abandon his job at the end of 1889. On the strength of a short story sold to Tit Bits...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1864, in London; died 1954, in London.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator. Landscapes.

Francis Donkin Bedford trained to be an architect at the South Kensington Schools and joined the practice of Sir Arthur Blomfield in 1883. Two years later he decided to change profession and enrolled at the Royal Academy Schools. He illustrated several popular children's books, and exhibited at the Royal Academy in London, notably in 1892....

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 30 January 1782, in Bordeaux; died 21 February 1863, in Paris.

Painter (including gouache), engraver, lithographer, illustrator. Historical subjects, mythological subjects, genre scenes, architectural interiors. Wall decorations, low reliefs.

Studied initially in Bordeaux under Pierre Lacour the Elder, then became a pupil of Vincent and David. He exhibited on a regular basis at Salons between ...

Article

(b Salzburg, May 1, 1753; d Prague, June 25, 1829).

Austrian painter, printmaker, draughtsman, illustrator and teacher, active in Bohemia. He was taught by his father, the sculptor and painter Josef Bergler the elder (1718–88), and, during his stay in Italy, by Martin Knoller in Milan and Anton von Maron in Rome. An accomplished portrait painter, he was employed as official painter by bishops and cardinals at Passau and painted a number of altarpieces in Austria and especially in Bohemia. He helped establish the Academy of Fine Arts, Prague (1800), which placed a new emphasis on draughtsmanship, composition and Classical subjects and models. As the first Director of the Academy, Bergler won new academic prestige for art in Bohemia and, for himself, a privileged position in obtaining commissions such as the Curtain at the Estates Theatre (sketches, 1803–4; Prague, N.G., Convent of St Agnes). He also published albums of engravings intended as models (Compositions and Sketches...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 15 March 1883, in Stuttgart; died 29 May 1972, in New York.

Painter, sculptor, graphic designer, poster artist, illustrator, architect, designer, decorative artist. Designs for carpets, advertising art, furniture, lamps, wallpaper.

Jugendstil.

Deutscher Werkbund.

Lucian Bernhard studied painting at the Kunstakademie in Munich, but taught himself design. He was active in Berlin. In ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 17 January 1852, in Lyons; died 1930, in Paris.

Painter, copyist. Allegorical subjects, scenes with figures, genre scenes, figures, architectural views, interiors, urban landscapes.

Béroud lived in Paris from a young age and gained his early experience in the studios of the decorative painters Lavaste and Gourdet, before studying with Léon Bonnat. He exhibited at the Paris Salons from 1873, and at the Paris Exposition Universelle of 1900, where he won a bronze medal. A fervent copyist at the Louvre, it was he who discovered the first theft of the ...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, female.

Active in Canada from 1912.

Born 17 October 1879, in Ormskirk; died October 1957, in Vancouver.

Illustrator, painter. Landscapes.

Olive Allen studied under Herbert McNair at Liverpool School of Art and Architecture and later under Henry Tonks at the Slade School of Art in London. She illustrated a number of children's books and magazines, including ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 1818, in Milton (Massachusetts); died 1874, in Boston (Massachusetts).

Illustrator, architect.

Hammatt Billings is best known for his illustrations of the poems of Keats and Tennyson and his watercolours.

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1866, in Chaumont (Yonne); died 1911, in Ouchy (Lausanne).

Painter, watercolourist, illustrator, architect. Landscapes. Designs for tapestries.

Binet started a career in painting and studied under Victor Laloux (1850-1937) at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, before dedicating himself to architecture: he was one of the builders of the ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Active also active in Italy.

Born 11 June 1826, in Rouen; died 26 August 1862, in Rome.

Painter (gouache), draughtsman, watercolourist, illustrator. Landscapes, waterscapes, seascapes, townscapes, architectural views.

Bligny showed an early talent for drawing and was a pupil of Eustache Bérat in Rouen. He travelled in France, Germany and Italy where he became a pontifical zouave. He was wounded in the battle of Castelfidardo in ...