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Article

Arthur J. Pulos

(b Adrian, MI, April 27, 1893; d New York, May 9, 1958).

American designer and writer. He studied at the Cleveland School of Art, OH, and the Art Institute of Chicago, and by 1914 he had established a reputation as an illustrator, making portraits of operatic luminaries for the New York Times. After producing plays in Los Angeles (1917), he joined the Metropolitan Opera in New York (1918) and became a leading stage designer; he invented the high-wattage spotlight and developed modern theatrical productions that blended the play, its lighting, its performers, and their costumes into a cohesive whole. He gained international attention for his stage set (1921; unexecuted) for Dante’s Divine Comedy, which revolutionized theatrical and operatic productions; it was conceived as a single, massive set with lighting coming first from below, signifying Hades, and then, as the play progressed, from high above, signifying Paradise. This led Max Reinhardt, the distinguished German producer, to commission him to design the settings for a production of ...

Article

British, 20th century, female.

Born 13 May 1879, near London; died 7 April 1961, in Sussex.

Painter, engraver, illustrator, designer, graphic designer. Still-lifes, landscapes, portraits. Designs for wallpapers and fabrics, furniture, stage sets.

Bloomsbury Group, Omega Workshops, London Group, Euston Road School.

Vanessa Bell was the daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen, the sister of Virginia Woolf and the wife of the art historian Clive Bell. She started her training with the Royal Academician Sir Arthur Cope, and continued it at the Royal Academy of Art under the direction of the American portrait painter John Singer Sargent between 1900 and 1904....

Article

French, 20th century, female.

Born 19 November 1889, in Verdun; died 25 June 1972.

Painter, draughtswoman, humorist artist, watercolourist, illustrator, designer. Religious subjects, figures, portraits, genre scenes. Church decoration, furniture, frescoes, designs for tapestry, posters, costumes.

The third child of Edouard Branly, a doctor, Elisabeth Branly trained with Claire Chevalet, as well as with Jacques Cancaret at the Académie Julian until ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 1903; died 1979.

Draughtsman, poster artist, illustrator.

After training as an artist at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, René Brantonne took up commercial drawing. He spent World War II in the USA where he produced posters for films. When he returned to France after the war he began producing cartoons. However, he remains best known as one of the first and most celebrated illustrators of science fiction. He produced the covers for the Anticipation collection published by Fleuve Noir ...

Article

Hana Larvová

(b Zohor, nr Bratislava, Dec 25, 1935; d Jan 20, 1997).

Slovak printmaker, painter and illustrator. From 1951 to 1955 he studied at the Central School of Industrial Art at Bratislava and at the School of Fine Arts, Bratislava, from 1956 to 1961, completing his training there in 1963–6. In 1967 he was put in charge of the book production department; in 1981 he was appointed professor. His early work as printmaker and illustrator derived its inspiration from the imaginative tradition of Slovak art, which he interpreted in his own version of neo-Surrealism. In 1964 Klee, Kandinsky and Miró began to influence his work, and his illustrations were clearly inspired by Chagall. He gradually developed his own version of Mannerism and adapted his artistic language accordingly, aiming, in his graphic work, at the precise technical mastery of lithography, etching etc. Among his first works with Mannerist traits is Honour to Arcimboldo (1965; see Peterajová, no. 18), and the style is fully developed in the cycle ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b c. 1706; d 1753).

English engraver, designer of trade cards and furniture designer. In 1746 he published A New Book of Ornaments, and subsequently collaborated with Matthias Lock on a second edition (1752). The New Book contains designs for side-tables, torchères, clocks, frames, pier-glasses and fireplaces, very much in the Rococo idiom but also including such chinoiserie motifs as ho-ho birds and oriental figures. Copland also provided plates for the ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 1898, in St-Nazaire; died 1964, in Étables-sur-Mer.

Painter, engraver (wood), illustrator, ethnologist. Genre scenes, local scenes, seascapes. Designs for jewellery, furniture.

Ar Seiz Breur.

René Yves Creston trained at the École des Beaux-Arts in Nantes in 1919, then at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in ...

Article

Austrian, 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 22 October 1878, in Vienna; died 30 July 1960, in Hamburg.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator. Designs (furniture/fabrics/jewellery).

Jugendstil.

Wiener Werkstätte group.

Carl Otto Czeschka trained at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna, most notably under Christian Griepenkerl. He was a member of the Vienna Secession. In ...

Article

Polish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1866, in Lubaczów; died 1924, in Cracow.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator, decorative artist, ceramicist, sculptor, designer. Portraits, genre scenes, landscapes. Furniture.

Symbolism, Art Nouveau.

Debicki studied at the Akademie der bildenden Künste in Vienna from 1881 to 1884, then in Munich, Paris, Lemberg (now Lviv, Ukraine) and Cracow. He first settled in Lemberg and began teaching in ...

Article

Marcus Whiffen

Late 19th-century style of American architecture and furniture. It owed its name to the furniture designs of Charles Locke Eastlake (see Eastlake family, §3), which became widely known because of his book Hints on Household Taste in Furniture, Upholstery and Other Details, first published in London in 1868 and in Boston, MA, in 1872. The book was an immediate success in the USA, and six more American editions appeared in the next eleven years. In the preface to the fourth English edition (1878), Eastlake wrote of his dismay at finding ‘American tradesmen continually advertising what they are pleased to call “Eastlake” furniture …for the taste of which I should be very sorry to be considered responsible’. Eastlake-style furniture of the 1870s by such firms as Mason & Hamlin was decorated profusely with heavily carved Gothic ornament, whereas Eastlake’s own furniture had decoration that was simpler and more sparingly applied to emphasize function....

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 12 April 1871, in Berlin; died 15 April 1925, in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland).

Draughtsman, architect, decorative artist, designer, illustrator, author. Furniture, jewellery, lamps, art objects.

Jugendstil.

Deutscher Werkbund.

In Munich, August Endell studied philosophy, art history, aesthetics and psychology, notably a course run by Theodor Lipp on the psychological effect of the perception of lines and forms. There, in ...

Article

Aaris Sherin

(b Pittsburgh, PA, 1912).

American graphic designer, illustrator and painter. A student of Alexey Brodovitch, she graduated from the Philadelphia Museum of Industrial Arts and went off to assist Brodovitch as instructor at the Design Laboratory (1935–8). She was art director for Mademoiselle Magazine (1944), Harper’s Bazaar (1940, 1946), Seventeen and House & Garden (both 1949). Her freelance credits included Fortune, House & Garden, Life, Look, Seventeen, Town & Country and Vogue magazines. A successful designer and art director, the early part of her career was spent as a commercial artist. Later she turned primarily to illustration and fine art; areas where she completed the bulk of her life’s work. Today she is known for her small paintings, which are widely collected.

Falconer’s paintings are small landscapes and still-lifes that provide intimate vignettes of somewhat pedestrian subjects. The work has commonalities with folk-art, Surrealism and realism without falling into any one genre. She always approached her subject head on, depicting the commonplace in scenes including spice jars, flowers, boats, building facades and interiors. Her rendition of three pansies is given equal attention as her depiction of the more visually complex river boat houses in New Orleans. Regardless of content, she gives personality to her subjects with precision and a combination of softness and detail that reminds one of early American primitivism, without seeming either stiff or rigid. She designed six stamps for the US Postal Service including the Rose Stamp booklet (...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 15 February 1883, in Marktheidenfeld; died 15 February 1964, in Nuremberg.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator. Landscapes with figures, landscapes. Designs (ex-libris/fabrics/furniture/porcelain).

Jugendstil.

After losing his mother at a very early age, Hermann Gradl was brought up by his father's family, with one of his cousins, Hermann Gradl Sr, a Jugendstil artist who was highly thought of at the time. He was first trained at the Städtische Gewerbeschule, Munich, then in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1851, in Kiel; died 1917, in Hamburg.

Binder. Designs (furniture, book-binding, objets d'art).

Jugendstil.

Georg Hulbe was a bookbinder in Kiel from 1876. He moved to Hamburg in 1880. He then acquired his own leather workshop and, around 1900...

Article

Rosamond Allwood

(fl c. 1790–c. 1839).

English furniture designer. In the mid-1830s he described himself as ‘an upholsterer of fourty five years experience’. He produced a series of pattern books containing designs for furniture and upholstery that was widely used by commercial cabinetmakers. The Modern Style of Cabinet Work Exemplified (1829) was reprinted in an improved version in 1835 and was still in demand in the trade as late as 1862, when it was reissued unaltered. King claimed that ‘as far as possible the English style is carefully blended with Parisian taste’ in the 227 designs, but he also included Grecian and Gothic furniture. King’s interpretation of the prevailing French taste is a typically confused mixture of bold Baroque scrolls and lighter Rococo curves. His Designs for Carving and Gilding (1830) contains both Greek and Rococo Revival designs, as does Modern Designs for Household Furniture (n.d.). In 1833 King published a book of full-size designs for makers of cabinets, chairs and sofas, turners and carvers entitled ...

Article

German, 20th century, female.

Born 1875, in Leipzig; died 1948, in Althagen near Wustrow.

Illustrator, draughtswoman, decorative designer. Designs for fabrics, furniture and jewels.

Jugendstil.

Gertrud Kleinhempel studied drawing in Dresden, then in Munich, and made her debut in 1899 as an illustrator in Dresden. From ...

Article

Norwegian, 20th century, male.

Active in Britain from 1914 to 1917.

Born 1893.

Painter, designer, illustrator.

Omega Workshops.

Roald Kristian came to Britain in 1914 as a war émigré and found work designing furniture and illustrating books for Roger Fry's Omega Workshops. He was briefly married to fellow Omega artist, Nina Hamnett. In ...

Article

(b Roermond, Aug 25, 1864; d Amsterdam, April 15, 1932).

Dutch architect, theorist, industrial designer, illustrator and teacher. He grew up in the artistic milieu around P. J. H. Cuypers and probably received most of his artistic education in this environment. Between 1880 and 1887 Lauweriks attended various drawing courses including in 1885–7 those at the Rijksnormaalschool voor Teekenonderwijzers in Amsterdam. In 1889 he became decoration draughtsman in Cuypers’s office. In 1891 he became a member of the architectural society Architectura et Amicitia and from 1893 was editor of the society’s journal Architectura. At the same time, together with his friends and colleagues K. P. C. de Bazel and Herman J. M. Walenkamp, he became involved with ethical–anarchist groups and produced illustrations for Licht en waarheid, the journal of the anarchist group Wie Denkt Overwint (Who thinks conquers).

On 31 May 1894, with de Bazel, Lauweriks joined the Theosophical Society. This brought him into strong conflict with Cuypers. He left the latter’s office in ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 1889, in Levallois-Perret; died 1929, in Paris.

Draughtsman, illustrator, designer, binder, furniture designer.

Pierre Émile Legrain studied at the École des Arts Appliqués Germain Pilon and was one the representatives of the Art Deco movement. He did illustrations for L'Assiette au beurre - La Baïonnette - Le Témoin et le mot...

Article

French, 20th century, female.

Born 15 April 1895, in Loudéac, Brittany; died 2 September 1926.

Painter, engraver (wood), illustrator, designer. Frescoes, designs for embroidery and glazed earthenware, furniture.

Ar Seiz Breur group (The Seven Brothers).

Jeanne Malivel studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and then entered the les ateliers d'art sacré of Maurice Denis and Georges Desvallières. Upon her return to Brittany, she became a course instructor at the École Régionale des Beaux-Arts in Rennes in ...