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Article

Filipino, 20th century, male.

Born 1930, in Bohol, Philippines.

Sculptor. Figures, historical subjects, religious subjects, allegory, myths.

Napoleon Veloso Abueva graduated in 1953 from the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts (UPCFA), where he was mentored by the first National Artist for Sculpture, Guillermo Tolentino. He received another scholarship from the Fulbright/Smith–Mundt Foundation and in ...

Article

Lisa M. Binder

(b Anyako, Ghana, June 13, 1944).

Ghanaian sculptor, active in Nigeria. He earned a bachelor’s degree in sculpture (1968) and a postgraduate diploma in art education from the University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana (1969). After graduation he taught at the Specialist Training College (now University of Winneba), Ghana, in a position vacated by the eminent sculptor Vincent Kofi. From 1975 he was Professor of Sculpture at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Anatsui’s practice often makes use of found objects including bottle caps, milk-tins and cassava graters. However, he is not concerned with recycling or salvaging; instead he seeks meaning in the ways materials can be transformed to make statements about history, culture and memory.

His early work consists of ceramic sculptures manipulated to reconfigure pieces of memory. In 1978 he began his Broken Pots series, which was exhibited the following year at the British Council in Enugu, Nigeria. Several of the ceramic works were made of sherds that were fused together by a grog-like cement of broken pieces. Making art historical references to ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Merseyside, June 23, 1966).

English sculptor and conceptual artist. She studied at Kingston Polytechnic, Surrey (1986–9), and at Goldsmiths’ College of Art in London (1992–3). She had her first solo exhibition at City Racing, London, in 1994, and in the following year was included in General Release: Young British Artists at the XLVI Venice Biennale. Banner came to prominence with her ‘wordscapes’, large text works that recount the plots of feature films or other events. The first of these was Top Gun (pencil on paper, 2.13×4.57 m, 1993), a hand-written account of the film Top Gun presented on a cinematic scale. The ‘wordscapes’ led to the publication in 1997 of The Nam, 1000 pages of continuous text describing the Vietnam war movies Apocalypse Now, Born on the Fourth of July, Full Metal Jacket, Platoon, Hamburger Hill and The Deer Hunter. This unreadable text points to the excess of violence in such films, the numbing of critical faculties, as well as the mythologizing and fictionalizing framing devices used to interpret historical events. Towards the end of the 1990s she became interested in the implications of punctuation signs, dwelling on their qualities as abstract marks that give structure to text. By selecting a variety of fonts, enlarging the full stop signs to ...

Article

Francis Summers

(b Philadelphia, Dec 17, 1960).

American sculptor, active in England. He obtained a BFA from Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia, PA, and an MFA from Goldsmiths’ College, London, in 1988. Exploring his interest in the government of behaviour by social constraint, he first used clothes and hair as materials before turning to animal remains and casts of human organs for his increasingly unsettling work. His The Cat and the Dog (1995; London, Saatchi Gal., see 1996 exh. cat., p. 4) consists of two skinned animal hides with perfectly reconstructed heads and feet. Described by the artist as frozen smiles, the animal objects act as abstract surrogates for socially repressed bestial tendencies. Be Your Dog (1997; see 1998 exh. cat., p. 10), consisting of scalped dog ears mounted on a wall as an invitation to wear them, illustrates this theme even more forcefully. Other works by Baseman represent human body parts. Muscle (1997...

Article

Spanish, 20th – 21st century, male.

Active in France.

Born 1952, in Benicarlo.

Painter, sculptor, engraver, medallist. Landscapes with figures, urban landscapes. Statuettes.

Jorge Borras trained at the Real Academia Catalana de Bellas Artes de San Jorge in Barcelona. He is general secretary of the association of Spanish artists and intellectuals in France. Borras specialised in statuettes of young women captured in everyday postures. A certain softness of form is balanced by graceful signs of movement. For the Paris Mint, he created a medallion of Pope Benedict XIII, the last Avignon pope....

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Hexham, Northumberland, Feb 13, 1966).

English painter and sculptor. He completed a foundation course at Norwich School of Art (1984–5), a BFA at Bath Academy of Art (1985–8), and an MFA at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1990–92). His paintings typically reproduce the work of artists such as Frank Auerbach and Karel Appel in a slick, ‘photographic’ manner. He arrived at this manner of working after basing paintings on photographs of modernist buildings; a sense of thwarted utopianism became a central tenet in his later work. His first painting after Auerbach, Atom Age Vampire (oil on canvas, 0.82×0.72 m, 1991; priv. col., see 1996 exh. cat., p. 19), was a minutely copied, flattened rendering of the thickly impastoed original. Although such works are critical of the expressionist doctrine of emotional investment in gesture and materiality, they also retain an element of adolescent fantasy and absorption, as suggested by the title. Another strand of Brown’s art consists of copies of science fiction illustrations by Chris Foss (...

Article

German, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1946, in Gelnhausen.

Sculptor. Monuments.

Claus Bury trained as a goldsmith from 1962 to 1965, and attended Pforzheim college of industrial art and design from 1965 to 1969. He completed his training in London in 1969-1970. In 1971 he became a visiting teacher in several towns in Germany, the UK, Israel and the USA, and in ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Lahore, 1962; d London, Sept 1994).

British sculptor of Pakistani birth. He studied at Goldsmiths College, London (1987–90). After initially working in a wide variety of media, Butt settled exclusively on installations in the late 1980s. Because of his early death little of his work has become widely known, but that which has demonstrates by an interest in alchemy and a thematic preoccupation with seduction, pleasure and danger. Transmission (1990; see 1995 exh. cat., p. 65) comprises a circle of objects that look like open books, resting on the floor. The glass pages reveal a triffid motif that is lit by dangerous ultra-violet light. The series Familiars includes some of his best-known work and is concerned with the dichotomy between physical impurity and divine grace. It also derives from his interest in chemical properties, each of the three parts employing a different member of the chemical family of halogens: Substance Sublimation Unit (1992; see 1995 exh. cat., pp. 72–3) employs iodine confined in tubes set up in a ladder formation (the form was inspired by the mythical Santa Scala, or Holy Ladder of Perfection); ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1966, in Nottingham.

Installation artist, video artist, photographer, sculptor. Multimedia.

Young British Artists.

Mat Collishaw studied at Nottingham Trent Polytechnic from 1985 to 1986, and at Goldsmiths College, London from 1986 to 1989. He held a residency at the Camden Arts Centre ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Nottingham, 1966).

English photographer, sculptor and film maker. He studied at Trent Polytechnic (1985–6), and then at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1986–9), at which time he was included in the exhibition Freeze (London, Surrey Docks, 1988). For his first solo exhibition in 1990 (London, Riverside Studios), he created One Photo, Four Broads and a Stretcher (photograph on wood with broad light, 5.49×2.74 m, 1990; artist’s priv. col., see 1997 exh. cat., p. 44), comprising a colour photographic reproduction of Watteau’s L’Enseigne de Gersaint (1721; Berlin, Schloss Charlottenburg), greatly enlarged and cursorily attached to a wooden frame. By displaying a reproduction in this way, Collishaw highlights issues of representation, raised in the original painting through the juxtaposition of the false idyll of the fête galante, and the actualities of the art market. Much of Collishaw’s subsequent work makes historical and art-historical references that hinge around the broad theme of the interaction between nature and culture. ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1961, in Launceston (Cornwall).

Sculptor.

New British Sculpture.

Grenville Davey spent four years as an apprentice butcher before studying art, first at Exeter College and then at Goldsmiths College in London, graduating in 1985. He received the Turner Prize in ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Launceston, Cornwall, April 28, 1961).

English sculptor. After studying at Exeter College of Art and Design (1981–4), Davey took a Diploma at Goldsmiths’ College in 1985; his first solo exhibition followed at the Lisson Gallery, London, in 1987. Influenced by the sculpture of Tony Cragg and Richard Deacon in the early 1980s, Davey explored the formal character of the objecthood of sculpture often with a brisk humour. Button (painted steel, 0.36×1.5 m diam., 1998; London, priv. col., see 1989 exh. cat., p. 28) is characteristic of his early work: an overblown switch with cleanly finished grey top and cream-coloured rim, it borrows its form from mass-produced industrial objects, delighting in their highly finished quality, their bright colours and their abstract beauty, while denying their function. Gold (Table) (1991; see 1992 exh. cat.) marks a development towards larger work that addresses itself more directly to the viewer, in this case through its anthropomorphic size. Its title suggests a prosaic use, but its large size (with the top at head-height) again denies functionality, insisting instead on its identity as an object for pure aesthetic delectation. ...

Article

Martine Reid

(b Masset, Queen Charlotte Islands, BC, Nov 4, 1946).

Native American Haida sculptor, metalworker, printmaker and blanket-maker. He was the grandson of the Haida blanket- and basket-maker Florence Davidson (1895–1993), and great-grandson of the Haida wood-carver Charles Edenshaw. He began carving argillite as a teenager in Masset, and in 1966 he met Bill Reid, who offered him workshop space in Vancouver. There Davidson developed new carving skills and learnt the fundamentals of the two-dimensional (‘formline’) designs used by the Haida and other tribes of the northern Northwest Coast (see Native North American art, §III, 2). In 1969 he returned to Masset to carve a 12.2 m-high totem pole, the first heraldic column to be raised on the Queen Charlotte Islands since the end of the 19th century. In 1987 Davidson and his crew produced a set of three totem poles entitled Three Variations on Killer Whale Myths for the Pepsicola Sculptural Garden in Purchase, NY. In these totem poles Davidson worked within the strict conventions of the Haida style, refining it by introducing subtle variations in design but preserving a degree of conservative austerity in which movement and individual expression are sacrificed to overall unity of form. In his early work in silver Davidson used flat patterns influenced by Edenshaw, and he went on to develop these into an innovative style of his own in screenprints, silver and bronze. Davidson’s younger brother, ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 10 October 1960, in London.

Sculptor.

Cathy de Monchaux studied at the Camberwell School of Art from 1980 to 1983, and at Goldsmiths College in London from 1985 to 1987. She has worked as a part-time teacher at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. De Monchaux's intricate and richly ornamented sculptures often incorporate contrasting materials of soft elements, such as fur and soft leather, with hard, sometimes spiky materials like cut sheet metal or steel bolts. ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

[Catherine]

(b London, Oct 10, 1960).

English sculptor. She studied at the Camberwell School of Art (1980–83) and Goldsmiths’ College (1985–7). From the mid-1980s she made exquisite and intricate sculptures, at once seductive and grotesquely threatening. In the late 1980s her work carried an atmosphere of erotic restraint; Trace (galvanised steel, red silk chiffon, dimensions variable, six parts, 1990), was made by distending and bolting together metal strips to create brassiere-like structures. The latent sexual threat of her objects was often underscored in the early 1990s by provocative titles such as Defying Death I Ran Away to the Fucking Circus (1991; see 1997 exh. cat., p. 71), and Once Upon a Fuck (1992; see 1997 exh. cat., p. 70). Throughout this decade her work became more subtly seductive, early contrasts of red velvet and steel were exchanged for a faded, more ornamental aesthetic. From 1994 her work also became larger, more pictorial, often wall-mounted. ...

Article

Belgian, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 1950, in Kamisuku (former Belgian Congo).

Sculptor, medallist. Statuettes, busts.

Debay was a pupil of the sculptor and medallist René Harvent, and went on to become his working partner. She works in bronze and produces cast, struck and chased medals....

Article

Andrew Cross

(b Rochdale, Lancs, March 10, 1961).

English sculptor. He completed a BFA at Goldsmiths’ College in 1983, but did not begin showing his work until later in that decade. You Can’t Touch This (London, Hales Gal., 1993) was the title of his first one-person exhibition, which consisted of a false wall made from tightly stretched metalized polyester over a wooden frame; the illusion created was of a shiny golden lobby of an upmarket comtemporary building. A year later he constructed a ‘gold’ facsimile of a timber shed, Untitled (Shed) (1994; exh. London, Hales Gal., 1994), using the same technique. These two works had a particular resonance in the context of the site for which they were made, a confined basement gallery in a deprived area of South London, suggesting an ironic comment on the corporate façade of politics and commerce during the 1980s. When shown in Young British Artists IV (London, Saatchi Gal., ...

Article

British, 20th – 21st century, female.

Active in London.

Born 1963, in Paisley, near Glasgow.

Sculptor, installation artist.

Ephemeral material.

Anya Gallaccio studied at the Kingston Polytechnic (1984-1985) and at Goldsmith’s College in London (1985-1988). In 1998 she was awarded the Sargent Fellowship by the British School in Rome. She was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in ...

Article

Native American (Choctaw, Cherokee), 20th-21st century, male.

Born 31 March 1972, in Colorado.

Painter, sculptor, mixed-media artist.

Jeffrey Gibson received a BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago (1995) and an MFA from the Royal College of Art (1998), which was funded by his tribal group, the Mississippi Band of the Choctaw Nation. Since ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Belfast, Aug 20, 1963).

Irish sculptor. She studied in London at Middlesex Polytechnic (1985–8) and at Goldsmiths’ College (1990–92). She held her first solo exhibition (London, ICA, 1995) only two years after her inclusion in the Barclays Young Artist Award (London, Serpentine Gal., 1993) and Wonderful Life (London, Lisson Gal., 1993). In 1998 she was the winner of the IMMA (Irish Museum of Modern Art) Glen Dimplex Artists Award. At her 1995 ICA exhibition Hapaska exhibited perfectly finished and smoothly elusive floor and wall sculptures, as well as a hyper-realistic figure, Saint Christopher (wax, human hair, cotton, oil paint, 900×500×700 mm, 1995; London, Entwistle Gal.). The contrast between the two was typical of the highly ambiguous atmosphere evoked by sculptures that incorporated a range of synthetic materials, sound and light elements, and that often made reference to speed and travel, to utopianism and to a technological sublime. At her ...