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Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Born in Athens.

Sculptor.

George Demetriades exhibited a Head of Christ at the Salon de la Société Nationale in Paris in 1932.

Article

Greek, 16th–17th century, male.

Active fromc.1576 in Spain.

Born c. 1541, in Heraklion, Crete; died 7 April 1614, in Toledo.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman. Religious subjects, figures, portraits.

Toledo School.

El Greco (‘The Greek’) trained as an icon painter in the Byzantine tradition in his native Crete and spent 10 years in Italy, first in Venice, then Rome. From Italy he went briefly to Madrid, perhaps in search of commissions at the Escorial, and settled in Toledo in the summer of 1577. While there is little documentation of his workshop, his output while in Toledo implies the existence of a large studio, which was taken over after El Greco’s death by his son, Jorge Manuel Theotocopuli. El Greco was well educated and had a scholar’s library; his annotations in his copy of Giorgio Vasari’s ...

Article

Greek, 20th century, male.

Active in France from 1922 and naturalised from 1949.

Born 12 August 1916, in Istanbul, to Greek parents; died 23 October 1985, in Eygalières, France.

Painter (including gouache), draughtsman (including ink/wash), sculptor, engraver, illustrator. Religious subjects, figures, portraits, scenes with figures, landscapes, mountainscapes, landscapes with figures, harbour scenes...