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John Milner

[Lisitsky, El’ ; Lisitsky, Lazar’ (Markovich )]

(b Pochinok, Smolensk province, Nov 23, 1890; d Moscow, Dec 30, 1941).

Russian draughtsman, architect, printmaker, painter, illustrator, designer, photographer, teacher, and theorist.

After attending school in Smolensk, he enrolled in 1909 at the Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt, to study architecture and engineering. He also travelled extensively in Europe, however, and he made a tour of Italy to study art and architecture. He frequently made drawings of the architectural monuments he encountered on his travels. These early graphic works were executed in a restrained, decorative style reminiscent of Russian Art Nouveau book illustration. His drawings of Vitebsk and Smolensk (1910; Eindhoven, Stedel. Van Abbemus.), for example, show a professional interest in recording specific architectural structures and motifs, but they are simultaneously decorative graphic works in their own right and highly suitable for publication. This innate awareness of the importance of controlling the design of the page was to remain a feature of Lissitzky’s work throughout radical stylistic transformations. He also recorded buildings in Ravenna, Venice, and elsewhere in Italy in ...

Article

Deborah Cullen

[MoMA] (New York)

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) was founded in 1929 by patrons Lillie P(lummer) Bliss, Cornelius J. Sullivan and Rockefeller family §(1) to establish an institution devoted to modern art. Over the next ten years the Museum moved three times and in 1939 settled in the Early Modern style building (1938–9) designed by Philip S. Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone that it still occupies at 11 West 53 Street. Subsequent renovations and expansions occurred in the 1950s and 1960s by Philip Johnson, in 1984 by Cesar Pelli and in 2002–4 by Yoshirō Taniguchi (b 1937). MoMA QNS, the temporary headquarters during this project, was subsequently used to provide art storage. In 2000, MoMA and the contemporary art space, P.S.1, Long Island City, Queens, announced their affiliation. Recent projects are shown at P.S.1 in Queens in a renovated public school building.

According to founding director, Alfred H(amilton) Barr...

Article

C. Mierop

(b Brussels, Jan 22, 1939).

Belgian architect, photographer and teacher. He was among the last generation of architects to be trained at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Arts Visuels de la Cambre, Brussels, by the great names of Belgian Modernism, such as Victor Bourgeois, Louis Herman De Koninck and Jean De Ligne. After graduating in 1964, he became associated in 1968 with André Jacqmain, with whom he shared a taste for elaborate forms and a varied approach and language. From their collaboration emerged the Place des Sciences (1972–5) in the university town of Louvain-la-Neuve and various houses and offices in Brussels, including the block ‘Building Stéphanie’ (1982–3) at the entrance of Avenue Louise, which has been considered a successful Post-modernist addition to the city.

In 1984 he became a partner of Nele Huisman (b 1939) and was awarded the Robert-Maskens prize for a garden pavilion at Bierges (1982...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 24 March 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois; died 1 January 1958, in Carmel, California.

Photographer. Portraits, figures, nudes, still-lifes, landscapes, architectural subjects.

Pictorialism, Modernism.

Group f/64.

Edward Weston began as an itinerant portrait photographer in California in 1906, next working in a portrait studio and eventually setting up his own studio in Tropico, Los Angeles, in 1911. During this early period he worked in a Pictorialist mode, and in addition to producing sentimental images, such as ...