1-20 of 39 results  for:

  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
  • Eighteenth-Century Art x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
Clear all

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1744; died 1818.

Watercolourist, draughtsman, decorative designer, designer of ornamental architectural features. Architectural interiors, architectural views.

London, 25 June 1981: Interior Section of the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of Saturn and the Temple of Priapus (pen and wash...

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Louvain (Brabant).

Died 1819.

Painter, decorative designer. Architectural views. Ornaments.

Berges' work included views of convents and monasteries in Louvain, but these have been lost since 1789.

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active in Ferrara.

Born 1749, in Ferrara; died 1823.

Painter, decorative designer, engraver, architect.

A pupil of Ghedini, Luigi Bertelli painted frescoes and an oil entitled Demon in the Flames for the Chiesa Nuova; he also made etchings for Arrivo...

Article

N. A. Yevsina

(b Florence, 1745; d Dresden, May 17, 1820).

Italian architect, interior designer and decorative painter. He studied in Rome under Stefano Pozzi from 1766 to 1768 and then in Paris. On his return to Italy he studied antiquities, copying frescoes (with Franciszek Smuglewicz) and measuring and sketching the Baths of Titus (1774) and the villa of Pliny the younger at Laurentinum. He occasionally worked in Poland, where he showed his skill as an interior decorator. A designer of painted arabesque decoration, he combined classical architectural and landscape compositions with Baroque decorative effects. Notable examples include works at the palace of Izabella Poniatowska-Branicka and the royal palace in Warsaw, the Czartoryski Palace (the Pheasantry) at Natolin, and other great houses in Poland.

In late 1783 or early 1784 he was invited to St Petersburg by the heir to the Russian throne, Paul Petrovich (later Tsar Paul I, reg 1796–1801) for the building of his country residence at ...

Article

French, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 4 May 1757, in Nantes; died 6 July 1817, in Paris.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, architect. Mythological subjects, figures, genre scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures, urban views, architectural views. Wall decorations.

Béguyer de Chancourtois entered the École de l'Académie Royale as a pupil of Jollain and the younger Peyre on ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b c. 1745; d 1835).

English architect and designer. In 1765 he published 12 engravings of designs for ornamental ceilings, and the following year he published a set of drawings (by himself and some contemporaries) called The chimney-piece-maker’s daily assistant: or, a treasury of new designs for chimney-pieces. In 1770 he collaborated with a joiner to produce ...

Article

Flemish School, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 31 May 1765, in Liège; died 22 September 1823, in Liège.

Architect, decorative artist.

Article

John Wilton-Ely

Neo-classical style of architectural and interior design; as Egyptomania or Egyptiennerie it reached its peak during the late 18th century and early 19th. Napoleon’s campaign in Egypt (1798) coincided with emerging tastes both for monumental and for richly ornamental forms, enhanced by the literary and associational concerns of Romanticism. Unlike its Greek and Gothic counterparts, the Egyptian Revival never constituted a coherent movement with ethical or social implications. Indeed, since its earliest manifestations occurred in the later Roman Empire, the Revival itself can be seen as one in a series of sporadic waves of European taste in art and design (often linked to archaeological inquiry), acting as an exotic foil to the Classical tradition with which this taste was and remains closely involved (see fig.). On a broader plane of inquiry, the study of Egyptian art and architecture has continued to promote a keen awareness of abstraction in design and a decorative vocabulary of great sophistication. These are among the most enduring contributions of ancient Egypt to Western art and design. ...

Article

Hans Ottomeyer

The name derives from the first French Empire under Napoleon I (see Bonaparte family, §1). The dates defining the period of the Empire historically (1804–14) and the duration of the style itself are at variance: the early phase, referred to by contemporaries as ‘le goût antique’, was a late form of Neo-classicism and became more developed as the chaos resulting from the French Revolution subsided c. 1797. The Directoire style and the Consulate style—terms similarly derived from political periods in France—were both part of the development of the Empire style.

The term was originally applied to architecture, but because Napoleon rejected the building of new castles and palaces as wasteful, the style was especially used in interior design and decoration, later being extended to other decorative arts and fashion. There was strong conscious allusion to the civilization of imperial Rome through the building forms and motifs used by the first Roman emperors, who pursued goals of internal peace and a new order together with an expansionist military policy, as did Napoleon. Personal taste and comfort became of secondary importance to the demonstration of wealth and power. The Empire style spread throughout Europe and acquired fresh impetus with the Napoleonic conquests....

Article

German, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1748, in Dresden; died 1819, in Riga.

Painter, decorative designer. Landscapes, architectural views.

In 1786, 1789 and 1791, Fechelm featured in the exhibition of the academy in Berlin, gaining membership with his Views of Berlin (in oil). In 1790...

Article

Damie Stillman

Architectural and decorative arts style that flourished in the USA from shortly after the acknowledgement of independence in the Treaty of Paris (1783) until c. 1820. The term is derived from the period surrounding the creation of the federal constitution in 1787 and was in use in a political sense by that year. Essentially it was a form of Neo-classicism, strongly influenced by manifestations of that style in England and, to a lesser extent, in France; but at times certain more conservative qualities inherited from the previous Colonial period are also present. The inspiration of European, and especially English, Neo-classical architecture was to be expected in a society grounded in that of 18th-century England; but an added impetus was the association often cited at the time between the fledgling American republic and the ancient Roman one.

Although a few indications of European Neo-classical influence are found in the American colonies before the Revolution began in ...

Article

David Prout

In 

Article

Bruce Tattersall

Term used to describe the diverse styles of architecture, interior decoration and decorative arts produced in Britain and Ireland during the reigns of George I (1714–27), George II (1727–60) and George III (1760–1820). What might more accurately be named the Georgian period is, on occasion, further subdivided into Early (1714–1730s), Mid (1740s–1750s) and Late (1760s–1790s) periods. The term Regency style is applied to works of the period c. 1790 to 1830 and refers generally to the period when George, Prince of Wales (later George IV), was Regent (1811–20).

In architecture and interior design, the dominant aesthetic in Britain during the Georgian period was derived from classicism, but it took many different forms. The English Baroque that was current at the beginning of the 18th century was replaced at first by what became known as Palladianism, introduced by c. 1715 and championed by ...

Article

Gérard Rousset-Charny

(b St Ouen, nr Paris, June 7, 1737; d Paris, Dec 29, 1818).

French architect and designer. He was the son of the gardener at the royal château of Choisy-le-Roi and attended Jacques-François Blondel’s school of architecture, the Ecole des Arts, winning third place in the Prix de Rome competition of 1759. He spent five years in Rome (1761–6) on a bursary granted by Louis XV, and he made friends there with Giovanni Battista Piranesi. He returned to France via Holland and England. In 1769, at the suggestion of the King’s surgeon Germain Pichault de la Martinière, he was commissioned to design the new Ecole de Chirurgie (1771–86; now the Faculté de Médecine, Paris). The layout is in the manner of an hôtel particulier, with a court surrounded by an Ionic colonnade and closed off from the present Rue de l’Ecole de Médecine by a columnar screen. It was this feature that made a great impression on Gondoin’s contemporaries, lacking as it does the usual inflections by projecting end pavilions and central ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 25 March 1751, in Longarone (Veneto); died 1831, in St Petersburg.

Painter, watercolourist, draughtsman (including ink), architect. Landscapes, architectural views, interiors. Theatre decoration, stage sets.

Pietro di Gottardo Gonzaga was the son of Gottardo Gonzaga. He worked as an architect in St Petersburg ...

Article

Gothick  

Michael McCarthy

Term used in a more or less discriminatory way to identify the 18th-century works of the Gothic Revival in British architecture and interior design. Some historians use the term as a convenient shorthand for the 18th-century phase of the Revival; others intend it to highlight the ways in which the ‘Gothick’ of the 18th century—the fanciful and thinly decorative architecture associated with dilettanti and antiquaries—is manifestly distinct from the more historicist works of the 19th-century ‘Gothic Revival’, whose architects not only drew upon different forms or styles of medieval Gothic but were motivated by liturgical, religious and social concerns rather than by 18th-century Associationist aesthetics. Both spellings were used in the 18th century, but during the 19th century ‘Gothick’ became obsolete: Eastlake (1872) wrote only of ‘Gothic’ and Clark (1928) followed his example. That preference has been maintained by such historians as Macaulay (1975) and McCarthy (...

Article

David Watkin

Term used to describe a style inspired by the architecture of Classical Greece that was popular throughout Europe and the USA in the early 19th century, especially for the design of public buildings; it was also employed for furniture and interior design. Its gradual spread coincided with and was dependent on the growth of archaeology in Greece in the 18th and 19th centuries. Such archaeologist–architects as James Stuart (known as ‘Athenian’ Stuart in his lifetime) and Nicholas Revett, William Wilkins and C. R. Cockerell in England, Jacques-Ignace Hittorff and Henri Labrouste in France and Leo von Klenze in Germany were responsible for generating a remarkably self-conscious architectural revival; Cockerell used the term ‘Greek revival’ at least as early as 1842 in his lectures delivered as Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy. The style was first used in mid-18th-century England for garden buildings in such houses as Hagley Hall (Hereford & Worcs) and ...

Article

Sumpter Priddy

Also called marbling and graining, imitation painting was “the art of imitating the grain of various fancy woods and marbles” in paint (Whittock, p. 20). The practice was popular for decorating architecture from about 1700 through the early 20th century. After 1810, it was also fashionable for furniture. The first examples appeared about 1700 on the interior walls of major public buildings and in large private houses, where imitation painting tended to embody Baroque preferences for highly figured surfaces. Over time, marbling and graining spread across the social spectrum to include the middling classes, and evolved in style to reflect changing tastes.

The practice of imitation painting declined during the rational culture of mid-18th century America but experienced a resurgence after 1780, when excavations at the Roman towns of Herculaneum and Pompeii revealed painted interiors and spurred renewed interest in Classical culture among the educated. Painters attempted to imitate or allude to real wood, both in color and texture. Inspired by antiquity, imagery was generally reserved in character....

Article

Article

Sarah Medlam

(b Paris, Oct 9, 1795; d Paris, 1872).

French cabinetmaker. He was the son of Charles-Joseph Lemarchand (1759–1826), a cabinetmaker of repute in Paris during the Empire period. He first studied architecture but in 1813 entered the military academy at Saint Cyr. He was a strong supporter of Napoleon and was later awarded the Légion d’honneur. After the Battle of Waterloo (1815) he returned to Paris to take over his father’s firm. In 1846 he entered into a partnership with André Lemoyne and retired in 1852, although the firm continued under Lemoyne until 1893. Lemarchand became official cabinetmaker to both Charles X and Louis-Philippe, supplying furniture for at least five royal palaces. Furniture from these commissions includes bookcases in Boulle marquetry (Versailles, Château) and two consoles (1838; Versailles, Grand Trianon). He showed his wares at the Exposition des Produits de l’Industrie of 1844 in Paris but in general he seems to have shunned this method of publicity and to have dealt successfully with a large private clientele. He continued to produce his furniture in the Empire style, a taste that clearly accorded with his political preferences. The craftsmanship of his work remained high and dating can be difficult, although after ...