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Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 1825, in Paris; died 15 June 1883, in Philadelphia.

Sculptor.

From his early childhood, Joseph A. Bailly lived in the USA, where he worked as a wood engraver. Later he became a sculptor and for a long time taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Among his works are a statue of ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1873, in San Francisco.

Sculptor, engraver, painter.

Frank Chamberlin was awarded the Lazarus Prize in 1909, which enabled him to study at the American Academy in Rome.

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born in New York.

Sculptor.

Wilford S. Courow is known as a medal engraver. He had a studio at Moret-sur-Loing (Seine-et-Marne), France.

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 17 March 1832, in Meredith Bridge (New Hampshire); died 19 January 1910, in Ehnhurst, Long Island (New York).

Engraver (burin), sculptor (wood). Landscapes.

John Parker Davis studied in Philadelphia under Walter Shirlaw. He worked on the major New York magazines. He exhibited with some success at the Paris International Exhibition in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Germany.

Born 9 October 1848, in Covington (Kentucky); died 1919.

Painter, sculptor, watercolourist, engraver. Historical subjects, portraits, figures, interiors, scenes with figures.

Orientalism.

School of Munich.

Frank Duveneck's parents were German immigrants. Before embarking upon his art studies, he was a sign writer and apprentice to a church decorator in Cincinnati. He was a pupil of Johann Schmitt, Wilhelm von Diez and the Realist painter Wilhelm Leibl at the Bavarian Royal Academy in Munich from ...

Article

Carolyn Kinder Carr

[Decker, Francis]

(b Covington, KY, Oct 9, 1848; d Cincinnati, OH, Jan 3, 1919).

American painter, sculptor, etcher, and teacher. The eldest son of German immigrants Bernard and Katherine Decker, Duveneck assumed his stepfather’s name after his father’s death and his mother’s remarriage in 1850. He received his early art training in Cincinnati as an apprentice to Johann Schmitt (1825–98) and Wilhelm Lamprecht (1838–1922), decorators of Benedictine churches and monasteries. In 1870 he went to Munich to study at the Königliche Akademie, where he was taught by Wilhelm Diez (1839–1907), among others. The school stressed the study of Old Master painters such as Velázquez and Hals and emphasized bravura brushwork. Duveneck was an adept pupil. His realistic portraits of the 1870s, such as Professor Ludwig von Löfftz (c. 1873; Cincinnati, OH, A. Mus.), show the sitter placed against a dark background, the face and hands bathed in an intense light and modelled with thick, broad, fleshy brushstrokes....

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 15 August 1816, in Providence (Rhode Island); died 1872, in Providence.

Painter, sculptor, engraver.

Thomas Frederick Hoppin was the brother of Augustus Hoppin. He studied in Philadelphia and then went to Paris, where he was a pupil of Delaroche. He returned to America in ...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1930, in Bellingham (Washington State).

Engraver, lithographer, installation artist, sculptor.

Conceptual Art.

David Ireland studied industrial design and printmaking at the Californian College of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1953. He worked as an architectural draughtsman, a carpenter and an African safari guide before returning to art education in the 1970s. In ...

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 8 June 1876, in Altona.

Painter, engraver, sculptor.

Willi Otto Max Lange trained at the Düsseldorf Academy of Fine Arts, and at the Académie René Prinet in Paris. He painted Impressionist-style harbour scenes and seascapes.

Hamburg (Kunsthalle)

Hanover (Kestner-Mus.)

Article

American, 20th century, male.

Born 1925, in New York.

Sculptor, engraver.

James Metcalf studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia from 1947 to 1948 and then from 1950 to 1952 at the Central School of Arts and Crafts (later renamed the Central School of Art and Design) in London, where he specialised in forging and goldsmithing, casting, medal striking techniques and engraving. In ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1842, in Buffalo (New York State); died 24 October 1916, in Buffalo.

Painter, sculptor, engraver, illustrator. Landscapes, portraits, genre scenes.

John Harrison Mills was a pupil of John Jamison in 1857, and of W. Lautz in 1858. He was encouraged by L. Sellstedt and W.H. Beard. He was also a poet....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 April 1870, in Chariton (Montana); died 11 February 1956, in Chicago.

Painter (glass), sculptor, engraver. Stained glass windows, designs for mosaics.

Thomas A. O'Shaughnessy, a pupil of Maratta, Willits and Mucha, studied in Paris and Dublin. He specialised in painting on glass for windows and mosaics....

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 2 April 1817, in Pompey (New York); died 9 March 1904, in Albany (New York).

Sculptor, engraver (stone). Statues, busts.

Erastus Palmer was primarily self-taught. His Angel at the Sepulchre is at Albany Cemetery, his statue of Livingstone at the Capitol in Washington, and his bust of ...

Article

American, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 15 April 1741, in Queen Anne's County (Maryland); died 22 February 1827, in Philadelphia.

Painter, engraver, sculptor, writer, inventor. Portraits, landscapes, miniatures.

Charles Willson Peale's fame, is, above all, associated with Philadelphia, the city he moved to with his family in 1776. However, this highly populated and prosperous city had no tradition of portrait painting until Peale's arrival there. As a result, he has been recognised as one of the great figures of late 18th-century art in America, changing American perception, both through his work and the institutions he was involved with or founded. He was as important to Philadelphia as Copley was to Boston, yet his start in life was not auspicious. His father, an English Post Office clerk had been exiled to the American colonies, a convicted embezzler. His family moved to Annapolis, then capital of the province of Maryland, 10 years later, just after his father's death. In Annapolis Charles Peale started his working life doing manual jobs including working as a saddler, though he seems to have painted shop signs and there was little to suggest that he would become the central figure in a great family of artists....

Article

Patricia Junker

(Fidele Ponziano)

(b Intragna, Switzerland, April 14, 1872; d Carmel Valley, CA, Aug 1, 1945).

American painter, muralist, etcher, and sculptor of Swiss birth. He immigrated to California in 1887, following his father to the family ranch established in Carmel Valley, where he painted throughout his life. He studied in San Francisco at the California School of Design with Raymond Dabb Yelland (1848–1900) and Arthur F. Mathews, and subsequently in Paris (1895–8), much of that time with Jean-Léon Gérôme. Back in San Francisco, he established the Piazzoni Atelier d’Art in 1901 and commenced the life-long teaching career that established him as ‘spiritual advisor and father confessor’ to two generations of local painters. From 1919 to 1935 he taught at the California School of Fine Arts. In periodic visits abroad, he sought out the most advanced forms of painting and infused his students with the spirit of innovation, while his own art remained rooted in the aestheticism of James McNeill Whistler, the symbolism of Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, or of such contemporaries as Ferdinand Hodler, and the quietude of Japanese prints. In ...

Article

American, 19th century, female.

Born 12 June 1858, in New York; died 1937.

Painter, engraver, sculptor.

Pitkin was a pupil of Chase, Du Mond, Harrisson, Woodbury and Brenner. She was a member of the Pen and Brush Club.

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 27 May 1868, in Boston (Massachusetts); died 1948, in Norwalk (Connecticut).

Painter (mixed media), sculptor, engraver (etching), craftsman. Genre scenes, historical scenes, landscapes with figures, portraits.

Charles Prendergast was originally a frame and furniture maker in the Arts and Crafts style, making many frames for his brother, artist Maurice Prendergast. In the 1920s Charles began his own artistic career, developing a unique technique. He first did rough sketches of his compositions in crayon, charcoal or watercolour, then traced the designs on to a wooden panel coated in gesso. He dampened and incised the gesso, then smoothed the surface and painted upon it with tempera. Prendergast's early work, from his so-called celestial period between ...

Article

Jacqueline Francis

(b Washington, DC, May 23, 1941).

American sculptor, printmaker, landscape designer and teacher. The eldest child of seven children born to Reginald Puryear, a postal worker, and Martina Puryear, a schoolteacher, Puryear majored in art at the Catholic University of America. He studied painting with Nell B. Sonneman and Franz Kline, while Robert Motherwell and Wyeth family were among the artists he admired. Puryear’s work earned him notice while he was still in college: his paintings were favorably reviewed in a group exhibition at Washington’s Adams-Morgan Gallery in 1962 and he won the Baltimore Museum of Art Purchase Prize for work displayed at that venue in 1963.

After earning his BA in art in 1963, Puryear joined the Peace Corps and taught English, French and biology in a rural Sierra Leone school from 1964 to 1966. He studied joinery and wood carving with local artists and made woodcuts and figure drawings of his environment and the people he encountered....

Article

Michelle Yun

(b New York, NY, Dec 25, 1944).

American sculptor, draftsman and installation artist. Saret received a BArch from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, in 1966 and subsequently studied at Hunter College in New York under Robert Morris from 1966 to 1968. In the late 1960s his work was classified as part of the “anti-form” movement, which rejected the rigidity of Minimalism in favor of creating non-figurative works that were structured in part by the inherent physical properties of the industrial materials favored by this group.

Saret’s early sculptures from the 1960s and 1970s were primarily crafted from industrial metal wire of varying thickness, though he also sometimes used rubber, wire mesh or other non-art materials. They were often suspended from the ceiling or installed directly on the ground and exuded a weightless, ephemeral quality akin to clouds or gestural drawings rendered three-dimensionally. It was around this time, in 1967, that Saret began his ongoing Gang drawings series. These gestural drawings were initially created as preliminary studies for the sculptures and were produced by the artist spontaneously grabbing a handful, or “gang,” of colored pencils, thereby integrating an element of chance to the process....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Hoboken (New Jersey).

Born 4 January 1861, in New York; died 27 January 1912, in Hoboken (New Jersey), of blood poisoning.

Painter, watercolourist, sculptor, draughtsman, lithographer, illustrator. Western scenes, portraits, scenes with figures, genre scenes, landscapes.

Charles Schreyvogel carved Meerschaum pipes as a boy in Hoboken, New Jersey. He taught himself to draw and was apprenticed to a gold engraver, a die sinker, and in ...