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S. Kontha

(b Budapest, April 17, 1904; d Budapest, Jan 26, 1986).

Hungarian painter, illustrator, mosaicist, tapestry designer, stage designer, poster designer, printmaker, sculptor, teacher and administrator. From 1922 to 1929 he studied at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts (Magyar Kepzőmüvészeti Főiskolá) in Budapest under Gyula Rudnay (1878–1957) and János Vaszary (1867–1939). In the mid-1920s he became acquainted with Béla Uitz’s General Ludd series (1923; Budapest, N.G.) and in Venice he saw the work of such Russian avant-garde artists as Rodchenko and El Lissitzky and such Italian Futurists as Severini. In 1926 in Paris he studied the works of Léger, Braque, Picasso and others in the collection of Léonce Rosenberg. He was also influenced by the art of Brancusi and Joseph Csáky, as well as André Breton’s Manifeste du surréalisme (Paris, 1924). From the outset, Hincz’s work revealed a number of different objectives. Although he experimented with abstraction, the reference to the figure is always present in one form or another. His profound interest in humanity and its social interaction was based on, and motivated by, this interest in the figure. His early paintings are expressionist in mood and are composed of flattened forms in a shallow space in a manner reminiscent of Cubo–Futurist art. Elements of Purism and Surrealism are also present. After World War II he became increasingly preoccupied with realism, political agitprop art and the problems inherent in creating new symbols; a study trip to Korea, China and Vietnam in ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 October 1865, in Bromberg (now Bydgoszcz, Poland); died 24 July 1908, in Schlachtensee (Berlin).

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, decorative designer, writer. Landscapes, landscapes with figures, waterscapes. Posters, designs for carpets, designs for tapestries, designs (wallpapers/book-binding)...

Article

Native American (Tongva-Acjachemen), 20th–21st century, female.

Born 1952, in California.

Painter, writer, tribal scholar, cartoonist, basket weaver, illustrator, indigenous language activist.

As cofounder of Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, L. Frank Manriquez, a California Indian artist and activist, has become particularly associated with the movement for language revitalisation and recovery of indigenous knowledge in the state. A multi-talented figure with a gift for humour, especially in her cartoon works, she has exhibited nationally and internationally, and is a board member of the Cultural Conservancy, supporting indigenous rights, self-determination and the protection of native lands. She also makes and teaches about baskets and is a board member of the California Indian Basketweavers Association. As the author of ...

Article

Italian, 17th century, male.

Born c. 1583, in Coreggio; died c. 1650, in Rome.

Painter, fresco artist, draughtsman, engraver (etching), calligrapher, miniaturist, decorative designer, writer. Religious subjects, figures, genre scenes. Designs (embroidery).

Giovanni Luigi Valesio, the son of a Spanish soldier, began his colourful and varied career as a dancer, later becoming a decorative painter. In 1610, he became a pupil of Ludovico Carracci, who encouraged and developed his talent as a miniaturist, fresco artist and draughtsman. He is recorded as being in Rome in 1621, where he produced a series of remarkable embroidery designs for the Countess Lodovisi. He was also secretary to Cardinal Lodovisi, from whom he received a number of important commissions when the latter became pope, as Gregory XV....

Article

Pat Gilmour

( Claire )

(b Chicago, March 7, 1918; Los Angeles, Aug 23, 2011).

American painter, printmaker, tapestry designer, writer and lecturer. She left school at 15 to become a painter, using her given names, June Claire, but her reputation was made after her marriage, when she became June Wayne. Her first exhibition, in 1935, of watercolours based on Ben Day dots, took place a quarter of a century before the birth of Pop art and won her an official invitation to Mexico. Pursuing a rich diversity of ideas, fashionable and unfashionable, she often anticipated aesthetic developments. For example, her spatial constructions of 1950—ink drawings on glass slotted into a framework—predated Rauschenberg’s by 14 years, while the imagery of her lithograph Strange Moon (1951; see Gilmour, no. 12)—an expanded chequer-board traversed by floating discs—preceded Op art by a decade. Her lithographic illumination (1958) of John Donne’s Songs and Sonets was among the first books in the French livre de peintre...