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A. Ziffer

(b Görlitz, Feb 21, 1871; d Lüneburg, March 10, 1948).

German designer, painter, teacher and theorist. A self-taught artist, he made several study trips to Italy and the Tyrol. In painting he found inspiration in late German Romanticism, before turning to the English Arts and Crafts Movement. His designs were exhibited in 1899 at the exhibition of the Bayerische Kunstgewerbeverein (Munich, Glaspal.) and in 1901 at the first Ausstellung für Kunst im Handwerk in Munich. In 1902 he founded the Lehr- und Versuch-Atelier für Angewandte und Freie Kunst with the Swiss artist Hermann Obrist, developing a modern co-educational teaching system based on reformist pedagogy and popular psychology. In preliminary courses, classes and workshops, a broad practical training was offered primarily in arts and crafts. This precursor of the Bauhaus encouraged contact with dealers and collectors and was widely accoladed. When Obrist resigned from the school in 1904, Debschitz founded the Ateliers und Werkstätten für Angewandte Kunst and the Keramischen Werkstätten production centres attached to the school. In ...

Article

E. A. Christensen

(b Bexley, Kent, June 8, 1855; d 1924).

English designer and painter. He was the son of George Haité, a textile designer. Among his numerous publications on design, the most important is Plant Studies for Artists, Designers, etc. (London, 1884). Comprised of 50 plates of plant ornament, the book also contains a detailed life history of each plant. Using conventionalized motifs derived from a study of nature and Japanese art, he created ceiling designs for J. Tollman & Co., wallpapers for Arthur Sanderson & Sons and Essex & Co., and fabrics for G. P. & J. Baker. He designed small decorative objects; for example, his interior fittings (1896) for the studio of Mr E. Davis included metallic electroliers decorated with leaves and flowers, and four copper repoussé grilles representing the Four Seasons (for illustrations see White).

Haité was instrumental in founding the Society of Designers in 1896 and served as its first president. He produced landscapes in oil and watercolour, which he exhibited at the Royal Academy, London. An enthusiastic member of the Langham Sketch Club and the London Sketch Club, he was known for his rapid sketching ability....

Article

(b Rouen, Nov 11, 1738; d Paris, May 7, 1826).

French painter, illustrator and writer. He began his studies in Rouen and, at 17, won first prize for drawing at the city’s Académie. Shortly afterwards he travelled to Paris, entering the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture as a student of Jean-Baptiste-Marie Pierre. In 1767–8 he was in Rome, a fact confirmed by a number of dated and inscribed drawings and paintings, including the pen, ink and wash drawing Landscape Inspired by the Gardens of the Villa d’Este at Tivoli (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.). He was in Switzerland in 1776, where he spent several years drawing illustrations for Beát Zurlauben’s Tableau de la Suisse ou voyage pittoresque fait dans les treize cantons du Corps Helvétique (Paris, 1780–86). In 1780, having returned to France, he was approved (agréé) by the Académie Royale and received (reçu) in 1785 with Jupiter Asleep on Mount Ida (Paris, Ecole N. Sup. B.-A.). Thereafter he regularly exhibited moralistic pictures at the Salon until ...

Article

German, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 October 1865, in Bromberg (now Bydgoszcz, Poland); died 24 July 1908, in Schlachtensee (Berlin).

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman, engraver, illustrator, decorative designer, writer. Landscapes, landscapes with figures, waterscapes. Posters, designs for carpets, designs for tapestries, designs (wallpapers/book-binding)...