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Article

5th century, male.

Active in the first half of the 5th century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

This name is found on the volute krater found at Altamura and now in London. Some of his red-figure pottery has been found at Spina. He seems to have been active between 470 and 455 BC. His work is generally found on large vases and depicts solemn scenes, airy compositions imbued with a religious sense reminiscent of Aeschylus. The draperies are painted with a sense of volume, but the anatomy is still archaic in style....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Corinth, at the beginning of the 6th century BC.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Active 500 to 480 BC.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

The Berlin Painter is so called because an amphora painted by him, depicting, on one side, Silenus with a Lyre and, on the other Hermes with Silenus and a Hind, is preserved in Berlin. More than two hundred other vases, varying in quality, have been attributed to this artist. Those dating from the first two decades of his career are rigorous in style, while those from the following two decades are stylistically weaker and may be the work of a pupil....

Article

5th century, male.

Active between 430 and 410 BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

The Cleophon Painter is thus known as he painted the pottery made by Cleophon. He decorated a wide range of vases - stamnoi, kraters, amphoras, hydriai - with red-figure designs. A follower of Polygnotus, he was skilled in the painting of fluid draperies, dramatic feelings and faces with dreamy expressions. He paints with such ease that it seems that nothing is difficult. Faces, bodies and clothes are drawn with a clear and delicate line, where nothing clumsy interferes with the composition and only the essential is included. The figures are equally well drawn whether full-face or in profile, while the draperies gracefully embrace the shape of the bodies. Anything but insipid, these scenes mark one of the peaks in Attic Classical art....

Article

6th – 5th century, male.

Active between 500 and 480 BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

The Cleophrades Painter, Epictetus II, is known to have collaborated at least once with the potter Cleophrades, on the pelike no. 535 in Berlin which bears the signature of both the potter and the artist. The style of painting on this pelike is different from that of Epictetus I, and is found on many pieces of pottery made by Cleophrades. The habit has grown up, as a result, of calling Epictetus II 'the Cleophrades Painter'. While it runs the risk of a confusion between the painter and the potter Cleophrades, this convention means that there is no danger of confusing Epictetus II with Epictetus I....

Article

Clitias  

6th century, male.

Active in Athens.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Clitias, who worked with the potter Ergotimus, is known from his signature on five vases. The most famous of his works is the 'François Vase', named after Alexandre François who discovered it in Chiusi. This vase, a krater, is exceptional first of all for its size, with a maximum circumference of 1.81 metres (nearly 6 feet). A black-figure vase using a new technique for the time (beginning of the 6th century BC), its stylistic innovations do not exclude a number of archaic characteristics. The composition, which includes superimposed friezes of decorative motifs and processions of animals, is a survival from earlier, orientalising styles. The same is true of the shape of the eyes which, significantly, are shown frontally on faces presented in profile. While the limbs are shown in profile, the trunks of the figures are shown frontally. Despite this, Clitias has produced a composition of remarkable breadth, though with a tendency to a certain miniaturism - a tendency that was not to be taken up as Athenian vase painting evolved further....

Article

5th century, male.

Painter, sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Damophilus worked with Gorgasus on the temple of Ceres, Liber and Libera in Rome around 493 BC. Zeuxis is said to have been his pupil. Some terracottas and paintings attributed to him have been found in Corinth and Etruria....

Article

7th century BC, male.

Born c. 7th century BC, in Corinth.

Sculptor, painter.

Ancient Greek.

Eucheir, according to Pliny the Elder, travelled with Damaratus and Eugrammus to Etruria. He was a potter, and can probably be identified with the artist who, according to Aristotle, invented painting in Greece....

Article

Macron  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Macron's signature appears on two red-figure vases from the workshop of the potter Hieron. From these, it has been possible to attribute to him a considerable number of other pieces, particularly cups. To begin with he only painted the interiors of cups, but later he began to decorate the exterior, too, and with equal skill. His work dates from the end of the 'Severe' period, and he does not hesitate to depict scenes from everyday life, lovers and gymnasts. He also particularly liked Dionysiac processions. He is more interested in the movement of floating draperies than in anatomical detail, sometimes using them to enhance naked figures. His repertoire is not as varied or as inventive as that of his contemporary Brygus....

Article

5th century, male.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

This painter decorated pottery made by Meidias. He is chiefly known for two scenes from the one vase, the The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus and Heracles in the Garden of the Hesperides (British Museum).

The vase painters of this period, the late 5th century BC, were producing work that was elegant and perhaps even bland in style, as opposed to the harmony and grandeur of the architectural style of Phidias; the Meidias Painter is very much part of this tendency. His turbulent compositions, emphasised by the whirling of finely pleated draperies, show great virtuosity. It was a period when artists were fully in control of their medium, unhampered by any technical limitations and well able to present their figures from the front, in profile or three-quarters profile. No traces remain of archaisms, and the pleated garments lightly clothe the supple movements of the human bodies. Equal skill is evident in the drawing of horses. Following the example of Polygnotus, vase painters no longer placed all their figures on the same horizontal plane, but arranged them on roughly curving lines suggesting irregularities in the landscape. This type of composition was to be further developed by the Niobid Painter....

Article

Psoieas  

6th century, male.

Painter, potter.

Ancient Greek.

Psoieas is believed to have been a vase painter.

London (British Mus.): vase, signed