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Article

Israeli, 20th century, male.

Active from 1951 also active in France.

Born 11 May 1928, in Rishon LeZiyyon.

Painter, sculptor. Wall decorations, monuments.

Op Art, Kinetic Art.

The son of a rabbi, Yaacov Agam was educated at the Bezalel art college in Jerusalem. He was arrested by the British in ...

Article

Dutch, 20th century, male.

Born 18 January 1886, in Medan (Sumatra), Indonesia; died 1969, in Amsterdam.

Painter, engraver. Figures, landscapes, still-lifes. Wall decorations.

Gruppe Progressiver Künstler (Progressive Art Group), Socialistische Kunstenaars Kring (SKK) (Socialist Artists' Circle).

Peter Alma trained at the academy of fine art in The Hague between 1904 and 1906. Afterwards, he was influenced in succession by Impressionism and then Cubism. While living in Paris in 1914, he frequently mixed with Fernand Léger and Diego Rivera. He worked in Amsterdam. He belonged to the Dutch group in Paris with Conrad Kickert, Piet Mondrian and Lodewijk Schelfout. He exhibited during 1912 and 1913 at the Moderne Kunstkring in Amsterdam, the Sonderbund Ausstellung in Cologne and at the Salon des Artistes Indépendants in Paris....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Gordon Campbell

(b Tel Aviv, 1951).

Israeli designer, active in Britain. In 1981 Arad founded, with Caroline Thorman, One Off Ltd, a design studio, workshops and showroom in Covent Garden, London. In 1989, again with Caroline Thorman, he founded Ron Arad Associates, an architecture and design practice in Chalk Farm. In 1994 he established the Ron Arad Studio in Como (Italy). His most famous design is the Rover Chair, which recycled used Rover car seats. He has long had an interest in the use of steel, and the Bookwork bookshelves (...

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Biombo  

Sofía Sanabrais

Name used in Mexico and throughout Latin America for a folding screen. The word biombo is a transliteration of the Japanese word for folding screen—byōbu—an acknowledgement of its place of origin. The Japanese byōbu has long been a quintessential example of Japanese art and was a common diplomatic gift to foreign courts in the early modern period (see Screen, §1). Referred to as the ‘face of Japanese diplomacy’, byōbu were presented as ambassadors of Japanese culture to places as far off as London and Mexico City. Byōbu also found their way to New Spain as exports in the Manila Galleon trade. In 17th-century Mexico the Japanese screen was admired by artists and patrons, and was adapted and reinterpreted on a grand scale. The unique format of the biombo provided new ways for artists to depict subject-matter, and locally made biombos began appearing in the archival record in the first years of the 17th century. ...

Article

Burgau  

Gordon Campbell

[burgaudine; Burgos mother-of-pearl]

Decorative material used for inlays derived from a group of tropical shells of which the most common is Turbo marmoratus. It was long used in Europe for the decoration of weapons, cutlery and small boxes. In China and Japan the technique known in Europe as laque burgauté or lac burgauté...

Article

Buson  

Japanese, 18th century, male.

Born 1716, in the village of Kema, near Osaka; died 1783.

Painter, draughtsman, illustrator, decorative artist. Landscapes, animals. Screens.

Nanga School.

Buson was one of the creators of the Nanga (literati) School. It was only at the beginning of the 17th century that the ...

Article

Chinese, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1963, in Jinan.

Painter, draughtsman. Figures, genre scenes. Wall decorations.

Cai Yushui graduated from Shandong Art Academy in 1985 and had his first solo exhibition in that city in 1988. In 1994 he won his first prize at an official show, the ...

Article

Alison Manges Nogueira

Monumental, marble paschal Candlestick of the late 12th to early 13th century with reliefs signed by Nicolaus de Angelo and Vassallettus now in S Paolo fuori le Mura, Rome. The imposing column (h. 5.6 m), adorned with six registers of reliefs and surmounted by a fluted candle holder, rests upon a base of sculpted lions, sphinxes, rams and female figures. The upper and lower reliefs bear vegetal and ornamental patterns while the three central registers portray Christ before Caiaphas, the Mocking of Christ, Christ before Pilate, Pilate Washing his Hands, the Crucifixion, the Resurrection and the Ascension. The culminating Easter scenes reflect the paschal candle’s function during the Easter season as a symbol of Christ resurrected, as evoked in an inscription on the base. A second fragmentary inscription refers to the unidentifiable patron’s desire for commemoration. A third inscription identifies Nicolaus de Angelo as the master sculptor and Petrus Vassallettus as playing a secondary role. Both were active in the second half of the 12th to the early 13th century and came from leading families of Roman sculptors: the Vassalletti and Cosmati (Nicolaus’s family). The candlestick is the only work signed by and securely attributed to Nicolaus and the scope of his contribution remains uncertain. A plausible theory attributes the base and first register to Petrus, based upon similarities to works signed by him and ascribed to his family, such as the cloister of S Giovanni in Laterano in Rome and the narthex of S Lorenzo fuori le Mura in Rome. Nicolaus probably executed the Christological scenes, distinguishable for their more dynamic, expressive figures and decorative chisel work, and appropriate for the master sculptor because of their centrality and significance. Early Christian sarcophagi and Carolingian ivories may have provided models for the figural types. This form of paschal candlestick was probably inspired by Roman columnar monuments carved with triumphal scenes....

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Israeli, 20th century, male.

Active from 1948 active in Israel.

Born 16 December 1908, in Bucharest.

Painter, engraver, poster artist, graphic designer, decorative designer. Designs for tapestries, and stained glass windows.

He was an architecture student at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he later studied painting at the Scandinavian Academy and at the Académie Julian ...

Article

Chinese, 20th century, male.

Born 1944.

Painter, decorative artist. Landscapes. Stage sets.

Duan Zhenzhong graduated from the Central Academy of Arts and Crafts in 1964. He is currently chief set designer of the Beijing Film Studio. In 1989, he won the Coq d’Or for best set design....

Article

Ebony  

Gordon Campbell

Article

Turkish, 20th century, male.

Born 1911 or 1913, in Trabzon; died 1975.

Painter, illustrator, decorative artist, poet. Genre scenes, landscapes. Wall decorations.

Bedri Eyuboglu studied painting in Istanbul and at the André Lhote academy in Paris. A distant follower of Matisse and Dufy, he was basically a modernist, although at the same time he was also heir to the tradition of ancient oriental miniaturists. He was a notable illustrator, and carried out several mural decorations in Turkey....

Article

Chinese, 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 26 December 1900, in Chengdu (Sichuan).

Painter, lacquerer. Landscapes.

Fang Yong was taught traditional Chinese painting from an early age. He continued to paint in this style after moving to France in 1919, but also taught himself to paint in a western style, while retaining certain Chinese elements through his lacquer work. He rarely exhibited. In ...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Active in France from 1953.

Born 5 September 1925, in Japan; died 1 March 1982, in Paris.

Painter, decorative artist.

Paul Fujino first studied in Japan. Arriving in France in 1935, he attended the Académie Julian and the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts, where he worked under Souverbie, between ...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Active in Paris from 1913, naturalised in 1955.

Born 27 November 1886, in Edogama, near Tokyo, baptised in 1959; died 29 January 1968, in Zurich.

Painter (including gouache), watercolourist, draughtsman (including ink/wash), fresco artist, print artist (including lithography/etching/aquatint), illustrator, decorative artist...

Article

Walter Smith

revised by Carla Tilghman

(b Baghdad, Oct 31, 1950; d Miami, FL, Mar 31, 2016).

British architect, designer and teacher, of Iraqi birth. She studied at the Architectural Association, London, from 1972 to 1977 and then joined the Office for Metropolitan Architecture founded by Rem Koolhaas, one of her teachers; there she worked on the Dutch Parliament Building extension (1978), The Hague. In 1979 she opened her own practice in London, designing a flat in Eaton Place that won a gold medal from Architectural Design in 1982. She also began teaching at the Architectural Association (1980–87). During the 1980s she entered several architectural competitions, winning those for the Hong Kong Peak (1983, see fig.), the Kurfürstendamm (1986), Berlin, and for an art and media centre in Düsseldorf (1989). She also designed furniture and interiors (1985) for Bitar, London, and interiors (1990) for the Monsoon Restaurant, Sapporo, Japan. Her work seeks to develop the traditions of Modernism; it is inspired by Cubism, Futurism and Constructivism, but perhaps most profoundly by the Suprematism of Kazimir Malevich: she believed that the possibilities inherent in the work of such figures as Malevich had only begun to be realized. Sometimes described as ‘Neo-Suprematist’ and as resembling spaceships, her designs are typified by fragmented convex geometrical forms that engage and define the space around them, incorporating a Futurist sense of dynamic movement....