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Lewis Kachur

(b Argenteuil-sur-Seine, Seine-et-Oise, May 13, 1882; d Paris, Aug 31, 1963).

French painter, collagist, draughtsman, printmaker and sculptor. His most important contribution to the history of art was his role in the development of what became known as Cubism. In this Braque’s work is intertwined with that of his collaborator Pablo Picasso, especially from 1908 to 1912. For a long time it was impossible to distinguish their respective contributions to Cubism, for example in the development of Collage, while Picasso’s fame and notoriety overshadowed the quiet life of Braque.

His family moved in 1890 to Le Havre, where his father had a painting and decorating business. In 1897 Braque entered the municipal art school, where he met and became friendly with Othon Friesz and Raoul Dufy. He joined them in Paris at the turn of the century and, after a year of army service, settled in Montmartre in 1902. He began to visit the Musée du Louvre, where he encountered van Gogh’s work, and that October he began to study at the Académie Humbert, where his fellow students included Francis Picabia and Marie Laurencin. The following year he studied briefly with ...

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German, 20th century, male.

Active in France.

Born 1945, in Donaueschingen.

Painter, sculptor, mixed media. History painting, interiors with figures, architectural views, landscapes, animals, flowers.

New Fauves.

Anselm Kiefer began studying literature, law and art at the University of Freiburg in Germany, then travelled in Italy, Switzerland and France. He was a pupil of Joseph Beuys at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf at the beginning of the 1970s. He lived and worked at Hornbach/Odenwald, then in the 1980s he settled in France at Barjac in the Ardèche. Kiefer made his debut with conceptual performances, then created environments characterised by a taste for the splendours of antiquity, casting a slightly disillusioned glance in the direction of western culture as, for instance, when he fills a container with peas and slabs of lead to suggest a population census. What is memorable about these installations is the spectacular element: lead books weighing 675 lbs (300 kilos) collected together in a library of a hundred or so books, a cataclysmic atmosphere, which cannot leave the spectator unmoved; a rocket pointing skywards, broken glass and lumps of earth containing teeth brought together in ...