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Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Glasgow.

Stained glass painter.

Stephen Adam exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1892 to 1899.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Pittsburgh glasshouse founded in 1851 and active throughout the second half of the 19th century. The factory produced tableware and lamps; its glass included flint glass, lime glass and cut glass and, in the 1870s and 1880s, opal ware.

J. Shadel Spillman: ‘Adams & Company’, Glass Club Bull., 163 (1990–91)...

Article

British, 19th – 20th century, male.

Stained glass painter, enameller.

From 1893, Aikman exhibited the designs and executions of his works. He endeavoured to bring back to life in England the science of the master stained-glass painters of the Renaissance as well as that of the artists of the Gothic period....

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 1837; died 1892, in Salzburg.

Painter, draughtsman. Designs for stained glass.

The son of Max Emmanuel Ainmiller, he was trained by his father and Heinrich Hess. His work was done mainly under the guidance of the former, at the royal institute of glass painting. Numerous models for stained glass windows are by his hand....

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born in Angers.

Painter. Designs for stained glass.

His studio was in Laval. He worked mainly for his brother Ludovic, producing stained glass windows based on Ludovic's cartoons. Most of these windows are in Anjou. He also created stained glass windows for ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 24 March 1859, in Angers; died 1941, in Angers.

Painter, decorative artist, lithographer. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, genre scenes. Designs for stained glass.

He was a pupil of Ernest Hebert and Luc-Olivier Merson at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Between ...

Article

Belgian, 19th century, male.

Born 7 November 1840, in Bergen op Zoom, the Netherlands.

Painter, draughtsman. Religious subjects. Designs for stained glass.

Michael van Alphen was a pupil of J. Portaels at the Brussels fine art academy. In 1866 he exhibited in Brussels and Amsterdam, and in ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Type of American glass patented in 1883 by Joseph Locke (1846–1936; head designer of the New England Glass Co.) and Edward Libby (1827–83; owner of the glassworks; see also United States of America §VIII 3.). Amberina glass is usually amber at the bottom, shading to red at the top, but there is also glass in which the colours are reversed (known as ‘reverse amberina’). The effect is created by reheating the top (or, in ‘reverse amberina’, the bottom) of the glass before it has fully cooled.

Amberina glass was soon made at other factories, with or without a licence from the New England Glass Co. Amberina produced by Hobbs, Brockunier & Co. in Wheeling, WV, was made under licence, but the amberina made without a licence by Mt Washington Glass Works of New Bedford, MA, was the subject of litigation that first caused the company to change the name of its glass (to ‘Rose Amber’) and then, in ...

Article

Spanish, 19th century, male.

Born in Barcelona; died 1885, in Barcelona.

Glass painter.

Amigo was a student at the school of art in Barcelona and practised in the city where his works, the earliest of which date from 1866, can be seen in local churches including Sta Maria del Pi and Sts Just i Pastor. He is also responsible for the stained glass in the cathedral choir. Amigo took part in art exhibitions in Madrid and other Spanish cities....

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Glass painter.

Between 1869 and 1895, André d'Aix completed several stained glass windows for churches in and near Aix-en-Provence.

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Died January 1890, in Dresden.

Painter. Designs for stained glass.

Anemüller studied portraiture, genre painting, the painting of historical subjects, and stained glass at the academy in Dresden under Grosse and Pauwels. He exhibited in Dresden in 1880 and 1882. The church at Reuth has some windows by him....

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Born 17 March 1885, in La Ferté-Vidame (Eure-et-Loir); died 1953.

Painter, ceramicist, glassmaker.

Art Nouveau.

Gabriel Argy-Rousseau studied at the school of ceramics in Sèvres. He participated in the Salon d'Automne between 1920 and 1924, and exhibited glassware and enamel work at the Salon des Artistes Français in ...

Article

Michèle Lavallée

[Fr.: ‘new art’]

Decorative style of the late 19th century and the early 20th that flourished principally in Europe and the USA. Although it influenced painting and sculpture, its chief manifestations were in architecture and the decorative and graphic arts, the aspects on which this survey concentrates. It is characterized by sinuous, asymmetrical lines based on organic forms; in a broader sense it encompasses the geometrical and more abstract patterns and rhythms that were evolved as part of the general reaction to 19th-century historicism. There are wide variations in the style according to where it appeared and the materials that were employed.

Art Nouveau has been held to have had its beginnings in 1894 or 1895. A more appropriate date would be 1884, the year the progressive group Les XX was founded in Belgium, and the term was used in the periodical that supported it, Art Moderne: ‘we are believers in Art Nouveau’. The origin of the name is usually attributed to ...

Article

Alan Crawford

Informal movement in architecture and the decorative arts that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsman, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

The Arts and Crafts Movement developed in the second half of the 19th century and lasted well into the 20th, drawing its support from progressive artists, architects and designers, philanthropists, amateurs, and middle-class women seeking work in the home. They set up small workshops apart from the world of industry, revived old techniques, and revered the humble household objects of pre-industrial times. The movement was strongest in the industrializing countries of northern Europe and in the USA, and it can best be understood as an unfocused reaction against industrialization. Although quixotic in its anti-industrialism, it was not unique; indeed it was only one among several late 19th-century reform movements, such as the Garden City movement, vegetarianism, and folksong revivals, that set the Romantic values of nature and folk culture against the artificiality of modern life....

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in the USA.

Born 25 September 1871, in Italy.

Painter, draughtsman. Landscapes. Designs for stained glass.

Nicola d'Ascenzo went to America at a very young age and was a pupil at Philadelphia Fine Art Academy, where he later taught. He began his career as a portrait painter but in time had considerable success as a designer of stained glass. He was commissioned to create 11 windows for the chapel dedicated to George Washington in Valley Forge, a window for the John D. Rockefeller Church in New York, and a window for the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC....

Article

Gordon Campbell

American glass manufactory. In 1860 James and Thomas Atterbury (the grandsons of Sarah Bakewell, whose brother founded the glass company Bakewell & Co.) joined their brother-in-law James Hale to form the Pittsburgh glass company of Hale, Atterbury and Company. In 1862 Hale was replaced by James Reddick as the company’s glassblower, and the firm became known as Atterbury, Reddick and Company. On Reddick’s departure in ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 2 April 1831, in Innsbruck.

Painter, engraver, draughtsman. Religious subjects. Designs for stained glass.

Studied at the academy of art in Munich where he was taught by Professors Joseph Schlotthauer and Johan Georg Hiltensperger. His first composition was Christmas for the collection of Empress Elisabeth of Austria. While living in Vienna he painted several altarpieces under the guidance first of Eugene de Blaas and later of Joseph von Furhrich. He moved to Munich where his painting ...

Article

French, 19th century, male.

Born 8 December 1820, in Lyons; died 9 January 1888, in Lyons.

Glass painter.

Jules Aubriot studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Lyons from 1835 to 1839, then settled in Paris where he worked for many years in the Rue d'Assas alongside Charles Lavergne, the glass painter. He returned to Lyons in ...

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 25 July 1869, in Valence; died 2 February 1948, in Nice.

Painter, watercolourist, pastellist, draughtsman, engraver (including etching). Genre scenes, portraits, landscapes. Wall decorations, frescoes, designs for mosaics, stained glass windows, ornaments.

Having attended classes at the École des Beaux-Arts in Lyons in ...

Article

German, 19th century, male.

Born 25 May 1861, in Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland).

Glass painter.

Maximilian Auerbach worked on the Marienkirche and Georenkirche in Berlin, and on Bismarck's memorial chapel at Friedrichsruhe.