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Article

Swiss, 18th century, female.

Born 23 March 1706, in Switzerland, in 1702 according to some sources; died 1760, in 1750 according to some sources.

Glass painter. Figures.

She was the last representative of the glass painters who did so much work in Switzerland. Her works, generally of biblical or historical subjects, are generally monogrammed: ...

Article

Swiss, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 15 August 1666, in Sursee; died 1740.

Painter, glass painter. Religious subjects, genre scenes. Glass painting.

He was the most distinguished member of his family, and examples of his work - generally subjects taken from history or the Old Testament - are not uncommon. He also painted genre scenes....

Article

Swiss, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 13 June 1670, in Sursee; died 1740.

Glass painter.

Brother of Hans Peter Abesch and Barbara Abesch, whom he assisted in their work.

Article

Abot  

French, 16th – 18th century, male.

Glass painters.

Originally from Argentan; active mainly in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

[Johann Friedrich]

(b Hettlingen, nr Hannover, Germany, June 26, 1741; d Baltimore, MD, Nov 1, 1798).

American glass manufacturer of German birth. He was associated with his brother’s mirror-glass factory in the town of Grünenplan before his venture to make table wares and utility glass in America began in 1784. With backing from investors in Bremen, Germany, Amelung brought 68 glass craftsmen and furnace equipment to the USA. He purchased an existing glasshouse near Frederick, MD, along with 2100 acres. The factory, which he named the New Bremen Glassmanufactory, had been founded by glassmakers from Henry William Stiegel’s defunct operation in Manheim, PA. It was well situated in western Maryland, not far from Baltimore, which offered a fast-growing market. Many settlers in the area were Germans, who were expected to be supportive of the enterprise. During the following decade Amelung built housing for his 400–500 workers. It is believed that he built four glasshouses.

Although Amelung’s craftsmen made window glass, bottles and table glass, the most important group of objects associated with the factory are the high-quality, wheel-engraved presentation pieces (e.g. sugar bowl, ...

Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Glass painter.

In 1759, M. E. de Angelis produced stained glass windows for a Protestant church in Amsterdam. His signature is found on an Annunication.

Article

Dutch, 18th century, male.

Born 1702, in Groningen; died 1750.

Painter, glass painter, decorative artist. Figure compositions, portraits.

Johannes Antiquus studied glass painting with Gerard van der Veen and worked for a number of years in this field. He then placed himself under the direction of Jan Abel Wassenbergh, a distinguished painter of historical portraits, remaining with him for several years. Thereafter, Antiquus went to France, where he worked mainly as a portrait painter; however, his urge to visit Italy cut short his time in Paris. In Italy, he stayed mainly in Florence, where he was employed by the grand dukes of Tuscany for six years. His principal work was an important composition depicting the fall of the race of giants. When he returned to Holland he was very warmly received. The Prince of Orange commissioned him to decorate Het Loo Palace, for which he produced a large work showing ...

Article

Spanish, 18th century, male.

Active in Toledo.

Glass painter.

Aparicio Moreno painted glass in Toledo and León in around 1773.

Article

Liana Paredes-Arend

[Cristallerie de Baccart]

French glassworks. In 1764 Monseigneur de Montmorency-Laval, Bishop of Metz, petitioned Louis XV to have a glassworks built at Baccarat, near Lunéville, in order to make use of his vast forests. The factory was initially directed by Antoine Renault and was called the Verreries de Sainte-Anne because Renault requested permission to build a chapel so that the workers could attend their religious obligations. At first the factory produced soda glass for household and industrial purposes. In 1816 it was purchased by the Belgian manufacturer Aimé-Gabriel D’Artigues (1778–1848), who transferred his Vôneche glassworks near Namur to Baccarat, built a new factory and began the production of lead glass. In 1823 the factory changed its name to the Compagnie des Cristalleries de Baccarat and made plain crystal, opaline, and some alabaster and agate glass. In 1846 Baccarat began producing millefiori glassware and paperweights, followed by paperweights with flowers, fruits or reptiles. From ...

Article

Rosa Barovier Mentasti

Italian family of glassmakers. The family are recorded as working in Murano, Venice, as early as 1324, when Iacobello Barovier and his sons Antonio Barovier and Bartolomeo Barovier (b Murano, ?1315; d Murano, ?1380) were working there as glassmakers. The line of descent through Viviano Barovier (b Murano, ?1345; d Murano, 1399) to Iacobo Barovier (b Murano, ?1380; d Murano, 1457) led to the more noteworthy Barovier family members of the Renaissance. Iacobo was responsible for public commissions in Murano from 1425 to 1450. From as early as 1420 he was a kiln overseer, with a determining influence on the fortunes of the Barovier family.

During the 15th century Iacobo’s sons, notably Angelo Barovier (b Murano, ?1400; d Murano, 1460), and his sons Giovanni Barovier, Maria Barovier, and Marino Barovier (b Murano, before 1431; d Murano, 1485) were important glassmakers. From as early as ...

Article

Swiss, 18th century, male.

Active in Solothurnc.1722-1730.

Glass painter.

Urs Joseph Barthlimé's only known work is the shield in the book of the guild's coats of arms.

Article

(b in or near Kufstein, Tyrol, ?June 16, 1712; d Augsburg, before Sept 7, 1761).

German draughtsman and painter. Kilian, his earliest biographer, stated that after training as a blacksmith with his father, he learnt the art of glass painting in Salzburg. Following travels through Austria, Hungary and Italy, Baumgartner was authorized in late 1733 to live in Augsburg, on condition that he only worked as a glass painter.

Only a few examples of Baumgartner’s own glass paintings have survived; however, he must have meanwhile worked intensively on drawings for copperplate engraving. There are hundreds of these drawings; they were made with extreme care, often on tinted paper and often on a very large scale, for publishers in Augsburg such as Klauber, Engelbrecht and Kilian. Designs in oil on canvas for engravings, such as Moses Ordering the Killing of the Midianite Women (1760; Augsburg, Schaezlerpal.), were a particular speciality of Baumgartner. By far the largest series numerically is for a calendar of saints, the ...

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Active in Grenoble.

Glass painter.

Mentioned in Maignien's Artists of Grenoble.

Article

K. Somervell

English family of glassware enamellers. In 1760 William Beilby (1705–65), a goldsmith, moved his family from Durham to Newcastle upon Tyne, where his son Ralph Beilby (1743–1817) worked as a heraldic engraver. In 1755 William Beilby jr (1740–1819) was apprenticed to the Birmingham enameller John Haseldine. He was then employed with his sister Mary Beilby (1749–97) at the Dagnia-Williams glasshouse in Newcastle upon Tyne, where they decorated drinking glasses called ‘light balusters’ or ‘Newcastle’ glasses and decanters. Their early work is thought to have been influenced by the heraldic work of their brother Ralph: the decoration includes the royal coat of arms of George III and the Prince of Wales’s feathers, painted in full heraldic colours on enamel-twist goblets. Their work then became more Rococo in style, displaying rustic scenes, such architectural fantasies as classical buildings and ruins, baskets of fruit, floral subjects, fruiting vines, exotic birds, gardens and landscapes, using only white enamelling. Designs often incorporated standard vine scroll and hop-and-barley motifs. They used white, monochrome or a combination of enamel colours, and some glasses have gilded rims. Their glasses are often signed with only the surname. Before ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Article

Gordon Campbell

(d 1767).

English glasscutter. He sold cut glass and mirrors from his London shop from c. 1740. In about 1756 he became the first Englishman to use a water-powered cutting wheel, using the Ravensbourne river at Lewisham to drive iron lapidary and glass-cutting wheels.

A. Werner: ‘Thomas Betts: An 18th Century Glasscutter’, ...

Article

Walter Spiegl

Glass manufactory in Brandenburg. The first Brandenburg glassworks was established in 1602 by Joachim Frederick, Elector of Brandenburg (reg 1598–1608), and was run by Bohemian glassmakers. The earliest products included coloured and marbled glass. In 1607 the factory was transferred to Marienwalde, near Küstrin (now Kostrzyn, Poland), and another factory was built in Grimnitz in 1653. Both factories produced window glass and simple drinking vessels based on Bohemian models and painted with enamels or, from the mid-17th century, engraved. In 1674 Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg, built another factory at Drewitz near Potsdam for the production of glass crystal. The glass-engraver Georg Gondelach came from Dessau to work there from 1677, accompanied by the engraver Christoph Tille (fl 1685) and the enamel-painter Ruel. After the arrival of the glassmaker Johann Kunckel (1630–1703), the great period of Brandenburg glass began. Kunckel operated the glassworks in Drewitz from ...

Article

Swiss, 17th – 18th century, male.

Active between 1682 and 1711.

Born to a family originally from Sursee.

Glass painter.

Léonce Léontius Bucher became a citizen of Fribourg and a member of the Fribourg Guild of St Luke.

Article

French, 18th century, male.

Glass painter.

Active in Nantes in 1743.