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Abaton  

Article

Greek, 19th century, male.

Lived and worked at the monastery of Mount Athos in the middle of the 19th century.

Engraver (line-engraving).

An engraving by this Greek monk represents the Virgin enthroned, surrounded by the tribes of Jesse and a number of prophets. He is also noted for 24 small vignettes illustrating a Greek hymnal....

Article

Acestor  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Cnossus.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor is believed to be the father of Amphion, who was sometimes - though wrongly - credited with the Delphic Charioteer...

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3rd century, male.

Active in Argos.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acestor worked in collaboration with Toron, son of Apellion, also from Argos, on a votive statue from Troezen.

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Article

5th century, male.

Active between 460 and 430 BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

The Achilles Painter is named for his depictions of Achilles, particularly that on an amphora in the Vatican where the hero is shown armed with a lance and wearing a cuirass. He is depicted standing alone, while on the other side of the amphora is a female figure. This way of presenting single figures, one on either side of a vase, can be compared to the work of the Berlin Painter and initially had a very strong influence on the Achilles Painter. The rather exaggerated anatomical details of the early nudes is borrowed from the Berlin Painter....

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Article

Marco Rendeli

[It.: ‘red water’]

Modern name of an Etruscan settlement near Viterbo, Italy. It is situated on a small tufa plateau bounded on three sides by streams, one of which runs red. Excavations conducted by the Swedish Institute of Classical Studies during the 1960s and 1970s uncovered the tufa foundations of buildings that comprised various sectors of an ancient town. These provide some of the most extensive archaeological evidence relating to Etruscan domestic architecture and urban organization. The site was already inhabited in the 8th century bc and grew considerably during the following two centuries. Its main economic activity was apparently agriculture. Throughout its history the settlement had close links both with the coastal Etruscan cities and with those inland, in particular Tarquinia and Volsinii Veteres (Orvieto). It was permanently abandoned at the beginning of the 5th century bc, and the absence of any overlay of Roman or later material contributes to its archaeological importance....

Article

Gordon Campbell

[Gr.: ‘high stone’]

Ancient Greek statue with a wooden body and the head and limbs made of stone (usually marble, sometimes limestone). This technique seems to have come into use in Greece at the end of the 6th century bc or the beginning of the 5th, and was predominantly, but not exclusively, employed for cult statues. The wooden bodies of acrolithic statues were covered in sheets of precious metal or draped with textiles regularly renewed in cult ceremonies. In ancient Greece the term acrolith (usually agalma akrolithos or xoanon akrolithos) was used relatively rarely, and is first attested in temple inventories of the 2nd century bc; Vitruvius uses it in Latin as a synonym for colossal statues. It was then reintroduced as a technical term by 18th-century antiquarians.

While the wooden bodies of ancient acroliths are not preserved, their stone extremities have occasionally survived and can be identified through specific characteristics of their technical manufacture (acrolithic heads, for example, have flat undersides, whereas heads fashioned for insertion into stone bodies were made with convex tenons). In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, the extent of stone elements can increase, so that for example the head and naked parts of the chest are made of one marble segment. The appearance of acroliths could be similar to chryselephantine (gold-ivory) statues, to which they may have offered a more cost-effective alternative, although it seems that other considerations, such as their role within the cult ritual, may have been of greater significance. Examples of surviving stone fragments from acroliths are a colossal head in the Ludovisi collection in Rome and an ...

Article

5th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Selinus (Selinunte), Sicily.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Acron's name appears at Delphi on a base for two statues ( Asclepius and Hygieia?) offered by Philistion, a devotee of Asclepius. The inscription dates from before 400 BC....