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Article

Jan Jaap Heij

(b The Hague, Aug 18, 1871; d Amsterdam, Oct 19, 1934).

Dutch printmaker and painter. He trained at the Academie voor Beeldende Kunsten in The Hague, where he subsequently taught graphic art (1893–1911). In 1911 he succeeded Pieter Dupont as professor in graphics at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam under the directorship of Antoon Derkinderen. In the early years of his career Aarts produced some paintings using the pointillist technique, mostly landscapes (The Hague, Gemeentemus.); he also carved some sculptures in wood. He is, however, best known for his graphic work. In technique and subject-matter, his prints have a great deal in common with those of Dupont. As the latter’s successor he devoted himself to the revival of engraving, which his predecessor had reintroduced; his own experiments in this medium (in particular his scenes with diggers and beggars, all c. 1900) are considered milestones in early 20th-century Dutch printmaking. He also applied his skills to etching, lithography, woodcutting and wood-engraving; of the latter his ...

Article

Russian, 20th century, male.

Active from 1923 and naturalised in France.

Born 15 May 1898, in Saki; died 21 January 1980, in Paris.

Painter, engraver, graphic designer, illustrator. Portraits, circus scenes, landscapes, still-lifes, flowers.

Michael Adlen settled in Vienna when still very young, attended art school there and started exhibiting. In ...

Article

Romanian, 20th century, male.

Active in Israel from 1960.

Born 24 July 1912, in Romania.

Painter, engraver. Portraits, landscapes, animals.

Oswald Adler settled in Bucharest in 1934 and worked in advertising and graphic design. He trained late: he attended the academy of applied arts in Vienna in ...

Article

Cuban, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1947, in Pilon.

Engraver, lithographer, graphic designer.

Roger Aguilar graduated from the school of artistic education in Cuba in 1965. He has taken part in collective exhibitions since 1967. In 1975 he was awarded first prize for lithography at the National Engraving Salon. He works as a graphic artist for the Ministry of Culture....

Article

Austrian, 20th century, female.

Born 1937, in Traun.

Painter, pastellist, engraver, illustrator.

Having followed courses in calligraphy and typography at the fine art school in Linz, Helga Aichinger taught herself painting and engraving. From 1960 she executed woodcuts, pastels, collages, children's books and dolls. She exhibited in Vienna, Linz, Traun, Prague, Istanbul and Ankara and took part in collective exhibitions in Bologna, Bratislava, Belgrade, Beirut and at the Menton Biennale. Aichinger was awarded 'The Most Beautiful Books' diploma by the city of Vienna in ...

Article

Rosemarie Bergmann

(b Paderborn, 1502; d Soest, Westphalia, 1555–61).

German engraver, painter and designer. He was the most important graphic artist in Westphalia in the 16th century. His reputation rests largely on his ornamental designs, which make up about one third of his c. 300 engravings. They were principally intended as models for metalworkers but were also adapted by other craftsmen for such decorative arts as enamel, intarsia and book illustration. Aldegrever followed Dürer and the Nuremberg Little Masters, deriving models for his paintings and subject prints as well as a full repertory of Renaissance ornamental motifs: fig and Acanthus foliage, vases and cornucopia, combined with putti and satyrs, tritons, mermaids and dolphins, sphinxes, masks and medallions. From the beginning of his career Aldegrever was aware of the artistic trends of the time: the Dürer influence was strongest at its outset yielding somewhat in work of the 1530s to Mannerist tendencies under Netherlandish influence, though never waning entirely.

Aldegrever was the son of Hermann Trippenmeker (...

Article

Els Maréchal

(b Brussels, Oct 19, 1927).

Belgian painter, draughtsman, printmaker and film maker. He studied book illustration and typography at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture et des Arts Décoratifs from 1944 to 1946. In 1947 he became a member of the Jeune Peinture Belge group and had his first one-man exhibition in the Galerie Lou Cosyn in Brussels. In 1949 he became a founder-member of the Cobra movement after meeting Christian Dotremont. With a number of artist friends he set up a type of research centre and meeting-place in Brussels, the Ateliers du Marais. Towards the end of 1951 he went to Paris, moving to Japan in 1955 to study the art of calligraphy, also making a film called Calligraphie japonaise (1956). He adopted the Oriental manner of painting, whereby the paper is spread on the floor and the artist leans over the work holding the bottle of ink, allowing a greater freedom of movement. In ...

Article

Italian, 18th – 19th century, male.

Active at the end of the 18th century and at the beginning of the 19th century.

Engraver, illustrator.

Aliprandi was a line and stipple engraver and illustrator who engraved a number of Fragonard subjects, together with scenes of the Revolution (in the manner of Le Barbier) and several portraits of Louis XVIII (after A. du Morrona). He also illustrated the Venice Almanach of ...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Born 1927, in Takaoka, Toyama Prefecture; died 2001.

Print artist (woodblock).

Kazumi Amano graduated from Takaoka High School of Industrial Art in 1945. In 1950 he studied with Shiko Murakata, a renowned graphic arts master in Japan. After 1968 Amano visited the United States on several occasions and moved there to teach, then settled in New York in ...

Article

Roberto Pontual

(b São Paulo, 1935).

Brazilian painter and printmaker. After studying engraving in São Paulo, he moved to New York in 1959 to complete his studies at the Pratt Graphic Center, where his contact with international Pop art merged with his own interest in Brazilian popular imagery, for example in the portfolio of woodcuts Mine and Yours (1967). Immediately afterwards he began painting ambiguous and ironic still-lifes collectively titled Brasíliana, which use bananas as symbols of underdevelopment and exploitation, for example BR-1 SP (1970; São Paulo, Pin. Estado) and Bananas (1971; Washington, DC, Mus. Mod. A. Latin America). In 1971 he won a trip abroad in the National Salon of Modern Art (Rio de Janeiro), which took him again to New York between 1972 and 1973. On his return to São Paulo he began the series Battlegrounds, in which he submitted the previously reclining bananas to slashing, torture and putrefaction. Subsequently shapes were reorganized into configurations of an undramatic Surrealism, playful, colourful, tumescent and as firmly rooted as ever in his native Brazil and Latin America....