1-10 of 12 results  for:

  • Architecture and Urban Planning x
  • Artist, Architect, or Designer x
  • Ancient Rome x
Clear all

Article

T. F. C. Blagg

Roman architect. His first known work, and possibly his training, was in military engineering. He constructed the 1135-m-long bridge across the Danube (nr Turnu Severin, Romania) in ad 103–5, between Trajan’s two Dacian campaigns. It had a timber superstructure and arches on huge masonry piers and is represented on Trajan’s Column in Rome. Apollodorus’ treatise on the bridge remains untraced. His other major achievements were in Rome. Dio (LXIX.iv.1) recorded that he built the Baths and Forum of Trajan and an odeum. Substantial remains of the first two survive. The forum, built in ...

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time....

Article

Daniela Campanelli

Italian architect and archaeologist, of Swiss origin. He was a pupil of Luigi Cagnola and attended the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Milan, graduating in architecture at Pavia in 1806. He lived in Rome and between 1810 and 1814 was superintendent of the excavation of the Colosseum, which was being directed by ...

Article

Valeria Farinati

Italian architect, archaeologist and architectural historian. He studied architecture at the University of Turin (1810–12) under Ferdinando Bonsignore (1767–1843) and his assistant Giuseppe Talucchi (1782–1863). After serving (1812–14) in the fortress of Alessandria, he resumed his studies and obtained a degree in architecture in ...

Article

Thomas J. McCormick

French architect, archaeologist and painter. He was an important if controversial figure associated with the development of the Neo-classical style of architecture and interior design and its dissemination throughout Europe and the USA. He studied at the Académie Royale d’Architecture, Paris, under Germain Boffrand and won the Grand Prix in ...

Article

Elizabeth Rawson

First known Roman architect. Though a Roman citizen, he probably came from wealthy, Hellenized Campania (annexed by Rome). The pro-Roman King Antiochos IV Epiphanes of Syria (reg 175–163 bc) commissioned him to work on the Temple of Olympian Zeus at Athens (see...

Article

Dimitris Plantzos

Greek city situated on the island of Crete, by the north-west foothills of mount Psiloritis (anc. Ida), 30 km south-east of the present-day city of Rethymnon. It was a centre for Aegean and Greek culture from the Prehistoric to the Byzantine periods (4th millennium bc...

Article

Barry Bergdoll

French architect, writer and archaeologist of German birth. In 1810 he left Cologne with his lifelong friend J. I. Hittorff for Paris, enrolling at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1811 under the tutelage of the ardent Neo-classicists Louis-Hippolyte Lebas and François Debret. But from the beginning Gau was exposed to a wider field of historical sources, first as assistant site architect under Debret on the restoration of the abbey church of Saint-Denis (...

Article

John Wilton-Ely

Italian etcher, engraver, designer, architect, archaeologist and theorist. He is considered one of the supreme exponents of topographical engraving, but his lifelong preoccupation with architecture was fundamental to his art. Although few of his architectural designs were executed, he had a seminal influence on European ...

Article

Janet Delaine

Roman architect. Martial (Epigrams, vii.56) identified Rabirius as the architect of the emperor Domitian’s palace on the Palatine (completed c. ad 92; see Rome, §V, 3). It is usually assumed that he designed all of the building, although Cantino (1966) argued that his work was restricted to the Domus Flavia, the official wing of the palace. There is no ancient evidence that Rabirius designed any of the other buildings in Rome with which he has sometimes been credited. In the formal reception rooms of the Domus Flavia, Rabirius created a worthy setting for the Emperor as world ruler. The main rooms impress by their sheer size and rich columnar decoration; the focal point of each room was an apse where the Emperor sat enthroned. On the smaller scale of the residential section (the Domus Augustana) Rabirius exploited the potential of concrete construction to create a series of novel interiors, which, although borrowing many elements from Nero’s Domus Aurea, show a far more sophisticated manipulation of curvilinear forms within a tightly organized space. There is an emphasis on variety and surprise, achieved through contrasting room shapes, unusual effects of light and water, asymmetrical approaches and unexpected views, often of spaces which were not directly accessible....