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Article

Gordon Campbell

English painter of pottery and porcelain and the proprietor of a China decorating firm. In 1834 he began to work for Copeland, and during this period he may have developed the formula for Parian ware. He is given credit for its invention in the catalogue of the Great Exhibition of ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese ceramicist. He was the second-generation head of the Dōhachi family. His father, Dōhachi, son of a retainer of the Kameyama fief in the province of Ise, established a kiln at Awataguchi in Kyoto in the Hōreki era (1751–64), thereby forming his own school, and later assumed the name Takahashi Dōhachi. Along with ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese potter. He is thought to have been the grandson of Chinese immigrants who came to Japan to escape the turbulence at the end of the Ming period (1368–1644). He was adopted into the Okuda family of wealthy pawnbrokers, who patronized the Buddhist temple Kenninji, where, according to one account, Eisen lodged for a time. The temple was famous as a centre of Chinese learning, and it was probably this contact that stimulated Eisen’s first attempts at making Chinese-style ceramics. By the 1780s he was producing copies of late Ming-period enamelled porcelain called ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Finnish ceramic and glass designer. In 1945 he joined Arabia porcelain factory, where he dispensed with the notion of the china set in favour of mix and match tableware. His best known series was ‘Kilta’ (designed in 1948, sold from 1953 and relaunched in 1981...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Born c. 1894, in Takatsu; died 5 January 1977, in Mashiko, near Tokyo.

Ceramicist.

Hamada Shoji originally wanted to become a painter, but after visiting an exhibition of works by Tomimoto Kenkichi, decided to become a ceramist. He began studying at the technical college in Tokyo in ...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter and museum official. In 1916 he graduated from the department of ceramics at the Tokyo Technical College. He then entered the Kyoto Municipal Institute of Ceramics, where he worked with Kanjirō Kawai, who was his senior there. In 1920 he went to England with ...

Article

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese family of artists. They were established in Kyoto by the mid-14th century as sword experts in the service of the military aristocracy, for whom they engaged in the decoration, maintenance and connoisseurship of swords. In the late 15th century they emerged as leaders of the ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida and Andrew Maske

Japanese ceramicist and member of the Eiraku family. At the age of 13 he was adopted by Nishimura Ryōzen, the tenth-generation head of a family of doburo (earthenware braziers) makers for the tea ceremony. In 1827 he was invited to Kii Province (now Wakayama Prefect.) to produce porcelain for the local daimyo, from whom he received the right to use a silver seal bearing the name Eiraku. He obtained national recognition for his ...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter. In 1914 he graduated from the department of ceramics of the Tokyo Technical College and researched such subjects as glazes at the Kyoto Municipal Institute of Ceramics. In 1920 he obtained a climbing kiln (noborigama), the Shōkeiyō, with eight chambers, at Gojōzaka in Kyoto. In the following year he made his début with technically skilled works imitating the classical wares of China and Korea, for which he gained immediate prominence. In ...

Article

Kenzan  

Japanese, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 1663, in Kyoto Prefecture; died 1743.

Potter, painter.

Kenzan was the brother of Korin Ogata, the great Edo painter (1658-1716), and became known first as a ceramicist. He and Ninsei Nonomura introduced a new form of richly decorated ceramic art, which was very successful in the Genroku period (...