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Tunisian, 20th century, male.

Born 21 July 1921, in Tunis; died 1988.

Painter.

Dominique Agnello was somewhat influenced by Cubism, like many of his generation, but distanced himself from it with his use of strong colours and a tormented style.

From 1953, his works were exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants, at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, and at the Salon d'Automne....

Article

Armenian, 20th century, male.

Born 1939, in Yerevan.

Painter. Figure compositions, still-lifes.

A student at the institute of art and theatre in Yerevan, Karazian went on to settle in Moscow.

The structure of his paintings sprang from Post Cubism, although the rich, coloured harmonies which are often shown again dark backgrounds, are from Matisse. His works contain from a juxtaposition of planes enlivened with figures, objects, vases of flowers and purely decorative elements. The final result is always seductive while at the same time preserving a note of modernism. He took part in several national collective exhibitions....

Article

David Elliott

(Vladimirovich)

(b Bagdadi, Georgia, July 19, 1893; d Moscow, April 14, 1930).

Russian poet, critic, graphic designer and painter of Georgian birth. Although best known as a poet and playwright he studied painting at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture (1911–14) and, as a member of the Futurist group Hylea, was a pioneer of what later became known as Performance art. Mayakovsky’s family moved to Moscow on the death of his father in 1906, and he soon became involved in left-wing activities, for which he was repeatedly arrested. On passing the entrance examination of the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture in August 1911, his political activities shifted their focus to bohemian épatage. In the class for figure painting Mayakovsky met David Burlyuk, who with his brothers Nikolay Burlyuk (1890–1920) and Vladimir Burlyuk (1886–1917) and the ‘aviator poet’ Vasily Kamensky (1864–1961), formed the core of the Russian Futurist movement. Adopting a stance similar to that of Marinetti, whose Futurist manifesto (...