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Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; 1576–1654). Deported to Kyushu during one of the Japanese invasions of Korea in 1592 and 1597, he entered the service of Hosokawa Tadaoki (1563–1645), the newly appointed governor of Buzen. On the completion of Tadaoki’s fortress at Kokura (now Kitakyushu), Chon’gye built the Saienba kiln, probably within the castle precincts. A site thought to be Saienba was found beneath Myōkōji, the temple that replaced the castle in 1679, and excavations took place between 1979 and 1983. Sherds of both tea ceremony and everyday wares have been found there; they have transparent glazes made with a wood-ash flux, opaque glazes made with a straw-ash flux or brown-black glazes pigmented with iron oxide. Inscriptions on surviving pieces and entries in contemporary diaries indicate that these early products were also called Buzen or Kokura ware. After a few years the Saienba kiln closed, and ...

Article

Aigai  

Japanese, 19th century, male.

Born 1796, in Shimotsuke; died 1843.

Painter. Landscapes.

Nanga School.

After studying under Buncho (1763-1840) Aigai travelled through Japan. He settled in Kyoto but would later move to Edo (Tokyo) which became his preferred domicile. He was greatly influenced by Yi Fukyu and Ike no Taiga and mainly painted landscapes....

Article

Aiseki  

Japanese, 19th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 19th century.

Born probably 1837, in Kishu.

Painter. Landscapes.

Nanga School.

Aiseki was a pupil of Kaiseki.

Article

Patrick Conner

(b Maidstone, Kent, April 10, 1767; d Maidstone, July 23, 1816).

English painter, engraver, draughtsman and museum official. The son of a coachbuilder, he was apprenticed to Julius Caesar Ibbetson before enrolling in 1784 at the Royal Academy Schools, London. In 1792 he accepted the post (previously declined by Ibbetson) of draughtsman to George, 1st Earl Macartney, on his embassy to China. As the embassy returned by inland waterway from Beijing to Canton, Alexander made detailed sketches of the Chinese hinterland—something achieved by no British artist previously and by very few subsequently. These sketches formed the basis for finished watercolours (e.g. Ping-tze Muen, the Western Gate of Peking, 1799; London, BM) and for numerous engravings by both himself and others. For over fifty years his images of China were widely borrowed by book illustrators and by interior decorators in search of exotic themes.

Alexander was also a keen student of British medieval antiquities, undertaking several tours in order to make drawings of churches and monuments; many of these were reproduced in the antiquarian publications of ...

Article

Japanese, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1861, in Tokyo; died 1912.

Painter. Portraits.

Nakataro Ando was a pupil of Takahashi Yuichi. He was a director of the Tenkai Gakusha school and had many disciples. Later he founded the Hakuba-kai (Institute of Western Painting) with Kuroda Seiki and others. He painted mainly portraits. In ...

Article

Japanese, 18th–19th century, male.

Born 1748, in Sukagawa; died 1822.

Painter, engraver (etching). Landscapes.

Yoga School.

Denzen Aodo belonged to the Yoga School, but studied Nanga painting under Gessen. He later became interested in Western painting. Aodo was a landscape painter who served Lord Matsudaira....

Article

Margo Machida

(b New York, Aug 16, 1949).

American printmaker and installation artist. Born and raised in New York City, Arai, a third-generation Japanese American printmaker, mixed-media artist, public artist and cultural activist, studied art at the Philadelphia College of Art and The Printmaking Workshop in New York. Since the 1970s, her diverse projects have ranged from individual works to large-scale public commissions (see Public art in the 21st century). She has designed permanent public works, including an interior mural commemorating the African burial ground in lower Manhattan and an outdoor mural for Philadelphia’s Chinatown. Other works include Wall of Respect for Women (1974), a mural on New York’s Lower East Side, which was a collaboration between Arai and women from the local community. Her art has been exhibited in such venues as the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, International Center for Photography, P.S.1 Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art, all New York and the Library of Congress, Washington, DC. She is the recipient of awards and fellowships from National Endowment for the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and Joan Mitchell Foundation....

Article

Japanese, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in Tokyo.

Born 1872; died 1944.

Painter.

Juppo Araki received an honourable mention at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle .

Article

Japanese, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1831; died 1915.

Painter. Animals, flowers.

Araki Kampo was a painter in the Western style who specialised in flowers and birds. He was active in Tokyo, where he taught at the Imperial School of Arts in Tokyo and was a member of the Art Committee of the Imperial Household. He won a silver medal at the ...

Article

Born 1857; died 1931

Japanese, 19th–20th century, male.

Active in Tokyo.

Painter. Landscapes.

Tanrei Araki exhibited his work at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle.

2009, Faszination des Fremden: China, Japan, Europa, Hetjens, Museum, Deutsches Kera­mikmuseum, Düsseldorf

Reading, PA (Reading Public Museum)