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Article

Flemish, 16th century, male.

Active in Amsterdam in 1553.

Died 1575.

Painter, draughtsman. Architectural views, church interiors.

Flemish School.

Hendrick Aerts painted and decorated church interiors, one of which was engraved by J. Londerseel.

London, 1 Dec 1978: Interior of an Imaginary Cathedral during a Procession...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Active from 1511 to 1540.

Born in Sassoferrato (Ancona); died, in Cupramontana (Ancona).

Painter, sculptor, architect. Religious subjects.

Many of Pietro Paolo Agabiti's paintings decorate the churches of his native town. Santa Maria del Piano has a Virgin with St Catherine and St John the Baptist...

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Born 1502, in Paderborn (Westphalia); died c. 1558, in Soest.

Painter, designer of ornamental architectural features, engraver. Religious subjects, portraits.

Some biographers cite Heinrich Aldegrever's birthplace as the town of Paderborn, Germany, where his parents lived, while others claim it as Soest. He certainly lived in Soest after having completed his studies. In his study of the 'Little Masters' (so called because they engraved mostly small plates), Albert Rosemberg disputes that he studied under Dürer. Rosemburg even claims that he had never been to Nuremberg, despite van Melder's confirmation that Aldegrever worked at the high altar of a church in the town. It is indisputable, however, that Dürer strongly influenced him. Other artists who influenced him are Barthel Beham and Georg Pencz....

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Born c. 1480, in Altdorf, in Regensburg according to some sources; died 1538, in Regensburg.

Painter, watercolourist, engraver, draughtsman, architect. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, hunting scenes, landscapes, landscapes with figures.

Danube School.

Albrecht Altdorfer could be considered as important an artist as Dürer. He probably acquired basic artistic skills while working with his father Ulbrich, who is known to have became a burgher of Regensburg in 1478. Albrecht is also believed to have studied the art of miniature painting. Almost all of his artistic activity took place in Regensburg where he worked from 1508 in various official capacities, playing an active role in the public life of the town. In 1526 he was nominated as the town's architect and directed building works on the ramparts and slaughterhouses. He also became a member of the town council....

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

Flemish School, 16th century, male.

Born 1550, in Antwerp or in Breda; died 1584, in Rome.

Painter, draughtsman. Religious subjects, hunting scenes, landscapes, urban landscapes, architectural views. Frescoes.

This artist was probably the son of Mattheus Bril the Elder and the older brother of Paul Bril. He must have been very young when he went to Italy, since there is no trace of his name in Antwerp or any other town in the Netherlands. Bril appears to have gained a considerable reputation in Italy, and is cited as the painter of several frescoes in the Vatican, where he was commissioned to decorate two rooms. For the Sala del Consistorio he painted four pictures of ...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born shortly before 1536, in Cremona; died c. 1591.

Painter, draughtsman, engraver, sculptor, architect. Religious subjects, figures, portraits.

Antonio Campi was the son of Galeazzo and brother of Giulio and Vincenzo Campi. He worked first with his father and later at the studio of his brother Giulio. Before moving to Milan in 1561 he had worked in many different towns, notably Piacenza, Lodi, Brescia, Mantua, Cremona and Rome....

Article

Delia Kottmann

Italian village in Lazio, north of Rome, known for its church. The church of SS Anastasius and Nonnosus is all that remains of the 6th-century Benedictine monastery, which submitted to Cluny in ad 940. Apart from some re-used fragments, the architecture is Romanesque, with a Cosmati pavement in opus sectile as well as an ambo and ciborium. The church is famous for its wall paintings from the first quarter of the 12th century. The apse and its adjacent walls, showing the 24 elders, are influenced by Romano–Christian motifs. Christ in the middle of the conch is flanked by Peter and Paul in a Traditio legis depiction, with a procession of lambs below. Underneath, Maria Regina has to be reconstructed in the middle, between two conserved angels followed by female saints in a Byzantine manner. No Romano–Christian iconography seems to have influenced the vast apocalyptic cycle painted on the side walls of the transept. A band of prophets runs beneath the roof on all the walls of the transept. An inscription in the apse indicates three Roman painters....

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born 1509, in Gandino near Bergamo; died 1579, in Madrid, in 1569 according to the Larousse Dictionary.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman (including wash), architect, decorative artist, art restorer. Religious subjects, historical subjects, mythological subjects. Wall decorations, frescoes.

After a study trip to Rome, paid for by his protector Tobia Pallavicini, Giovanni Battista Castello (Il Bergamasco) produced a series of works in Genoa and Bergamo. His best-known works in Bergamo include the fresco ...

Article

Spanish, 16th century, male.

Born 1538, in Cordova; died 28 July 1608, in Cordova.

Painter, sculptor, architect. Religious subjects, portraits.

School of Cordova.

Pablo de Céspedes initially studied theology, then Oriental languages. He began painting during a trip to Rome, under the direction of one of Michelangelo's pupils. While he was in Rome he painted a number of frescoes in various chapels, which were so successful that he was nicknamed the 'Spanish Raphael'. He was offered a canonicate in his home town and returned to Cordova in 1575 or 1577, before settling there permanently after a second trip to Rome in 1583. It was there that he painted his ...