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Article

Amasis  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Ionia.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Attic School.

The signature Amasis made this ( Amasis epoiesen), may mean that Amasis was not the artist who painted these vases, but the potter. Three amphorae, four oenochoes (wine jugs) and the remains of a kylix (drinking vessel) exist by this artist. The subjects are taken from Homer, the legend of Heracles, and the myth of Perseus and the Gorgon. The figures in his pottery are black-figure Attic in style, standing out clearly against a plain background. Their clothes are decorated with incised and often geometric detail. The artist has highlighted the clothes with a purplish red and the flesh of the women with white....

Article

Anacles  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Working in the Attic black-figure style, Anacles' signature appears coupled with that of Nicosthenes.

Article

6th century, male.

Active at the end of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter.

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

Credited with inventing red-figure ceramic painting, Andocides produced both red- and black-figure vases. The clothes of his figures are ornamented, while his naked figures are decorative, with the muscles indicated by geometric patterns....

Article

6th century, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

The signature Archenides [made] me ( Archeneides me) appears on both sides of an Attic black-figure cup.

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

The signature of Archicles sometimes appears alongside that of Glaucytes. Little of his own work remains.

Article

7th century, male.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

Aristonothus' signature appears on a krater from Caere.

Rome (Palazzo dei Conservatori): krater

Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time.

Astrology developed into a scientific branch of learning in ancient Greece, but because of the opposition of the Church Fathers it was transmitted to early medieval Europe in only fragmentary form in technically unsophisticated textbooks and popular divinatory genres. Literary and scientific texts provided more general ideas about the nature and attributes of the planets which were influential on later iconography. The first significant astrological images appear in 11th-century illustrated astronomical texts (e.g. London, BL, Cotton MS. Tiberius BV), which were acquired and produced by monasteries to aid with time-keeping and the construction of the Christian calendar....

Article

6th century, male.

Active in Corinth.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Article

, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Charmadas, a contemporary of Dinias and Hygiaenon, lived in the 8th or, according to some scholars, the 6th century BC.

Article

6th century BC, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

Epictetus' signature is found both as a painter and as a potter. In the period around 525-520 BC, vase painters moved from painting black figures on a red background to red figures on a black background. Naturally, this change did not take place overnight and some artists continued to paint in the older style while other, more innovative, artists developed a new style. Epictetus sometimes used the two techniques on the same vase, one on the interior and one on the exterior. Unlike his contemporary Cleophrades (also known as Epictetus II), however, he was not able to take advantage of all the implications of the new red-figure style. He produced little more than a negative version of black-figure painting: the white incisions indicating detail within the black figures are replaced by black lines that retain the stiffness of the incisions....