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Article

Paul Hulton

(Antonio Melchiorre)

(b Bologna, Jan 14, 1737; d Gondar, Ethiopia, between 14 Feb and March 3, 1771).

Italian draughtsman and printmaker . He showed early artistic promise and was apprenticed to Giuseppe Civoli (1705–78), a Bolognese painter and professor of architecture at the Accademia Clementina in Bologna. As a student he won the gold medal for architectural design in an open competition at Parma in 1759. He was consequently elected an academician in Bologna at the early age of 22. For his patron, the count and senator Girolamo Ranuzzi, he drew and etched (c. 1760) a notable set of plates of the Palazzo Ranuzzi (now the Palazzo di Giustizia) in Bologna. In 1761 he moved to Rome and began to take commissions as an architectural draughtsman. Here he was recruited to assist the explorer James Bruce of Kinnaird (1730–94) to draw and record Classical remains. For about three years from March 1765 Balugani travelled with Bruce, recording most of the known Classical sites of North Africa and Asia Minor. When Bruce decided to extend his travels to Ethiopia, by way of Egypt and Arabia, to search for the source of the Nile, Balugani accompanied him and made numerous drawings of botanical and zoological specimens, despite having also to compile weather records and travel journals. He was with Bruce when the latter discovered the springs of the Blue Nile (which they believed to be the source of the main river) in ...

Article

Francis Russell

(b ?1715; d London, Feb 7, 1791).

English draughtsman, engraver and dealer. As agent to a number of patrons and subsequently librarian to George III, he was one of the most influential figures in the sphere of collecting in England for some four decades. He was the son of the Rev. John Dalton and younger brother of the Rev. John Dalton, poet and divine, whose connection with Algernon Seymour, Earl of Hertford (later 7th Duke of Somerset), forwarded Richard’s early career in Italy. He had arrived there by 1739 and may have trained in Bologna; by 1741 he was studying under Agostino Masucci in Rome and was already active as a dealer, selling a collection of prints in that year to Henry Clinton, 9th Earl of Lincoln, and cultivating the patronage of Sir Erasmus Philipps, Bart.

In 1749 Dalton visited Calabria and Sicily and then, in his capacity as travelling draughtsman, joined the party of James Caulfeild, 1st Earl of Charlemont, on a tour of Egypt, Turkey and Greece. He was possibly the first English artist to record the ancient monuments of these places. A selection of drawings executed on this tour was engraved by Dalton and published in ...

Article

Christiaan Schuckman

[Speculatie]

(b Nijmegen, bapt May 23, 1648; d before 1709).

Dutch etcher, engraver, draughtsman, inventor and professor of philosophy and mathematics. From 1679 he travelled in Italy, Egypt, the Holy Land and Malta, where he drew ‘modern’ fortifications. After a journey to Berlin in 1683, he probably settled in the province of Holland. Between 1683 and 1688 he developed a method of making colour impressions from a single copperplate (see Prints §III 6.), for which the States of Holland granted him a 15-year patent in 1688. Teyler moved his colour-print workshop to Rotterdam, where he published Architectura militaris. It is probably Jan van Call (1689–after 1748), one of Teyler’s assistants, who passed on the latter’s invention to Pieter Schenck and Gerard Valck, while Mattheus Berckenboom (1667–c. 1722), possibly an assistant in Rotterdam, made colour impressions in Nijmegen between c. 1700 and 1722. In 1698 Teyler’s copperplates were auctioned in Rotterdam. It is difficult to distinguish Teyler’s hand from that of his assistants in the 300–350 or so colour prints that have come down from his workshop....