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South African, 20th–21st century, male.

Born 28 April 1955, in Johannesburg.

Draughtsman, engraver, graphic designer, film producer, sculptor, theatre and opera designer and producer. Multimedia, animated films.

Land Art.

Although William Kentridge has practised his creativity in many domains and in a wide range of media (animated films, land art, sculpture, printmaking, theatre and opera design and production, installations), it is chiefly his large-scale charcoal drawings in process (drawing for animation) and his unique, short, animated films and their projection that have given him international fame....

Article

Deborah A. Hoover

(Bwalwa)

(b Mwense, 1961).

Zambian painter, sculptor, graphic artist and administrator. He received a diploma in the teaching of art from Evelyn Hone College, Lusaka (1989), and obtained both his BA (1998) and MA (1999) in Fine Art from Middlesex University, London. He worked as a cartographer (1985–6) for the World Health Organization at TDRC and taught art from 1990 to 1992. Since then he has been active in the arts community, initiating grassroots and high-level projects. He founded the Zambia National Visual Arts Council (1989) and managed the Henry Tayali Centre (1994), proposed ‘Nimbile’ as a name for the Mbile Workshop (1992) and established regional and international art links. In 1994 he travelled to the US on an Art Administration study tour sponsored by the US Information Services (USIS). In addition to his own studio practice, he curated national and international exhibitions, mounting the first contemporary art exhibition to inaugurate the new National Museum in Lusaka (...

Article

(b Nimo, April 30, 1933).

Nigerian painter, sculptor, illustrator and poet. After attending Bishop Shanahan Secondary School, Orlu (1950–53), he received a degree in Fine Arts from the Nigerian College of Arts, Science and Technology, Zaria (1957–61). In 1958 he founded the Asele Institute in Kafanchan for research in Nigerian art and culture. In the 1960s he was a member of the Ibadan Mbari Club, and a few years later formed the Enugu branch of Mbari that became a centre for artists of the Eastern region. His interest in Nigerian visual culture, especially that of his own Ibgo people, was most evident in his attention to and use of uli patterns (see Africa §V 3.) in his works, such as Oja Suite (1962; Nimo, Asele Inst.). He employed these organic, gestural lines to depict Igbo folktales as well as to produce the later Munich Suite (1963) during his travels in Germany. He was a founding member of the Zaria Art Society, which sought to create a Nigerian artistic expression based on a synthesis of indigenous and foreign art traditions. In ...