1-10 of 2,961 results  for:

  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
  • Twentieth-Century Art x
  • Sculpture and Carving x
Clear all

Article

Danish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 14 August 1852, in Nyborg.

Sculptor. Statues.

Initially a woodcarver, Carl Wilhelm Oluf Peter Aarsleff went on to study under Fjeldskov at the Kunstakademi in Copenhagen from 1872 to 1876. In 1879 his statue of Telemachus, now in the museum of Odense, earned him a gold medal. He visited Paris, Greece and Italy, where he stayed for quite some time in Rome. His works can be seen in the art gallery of Copenhagen and at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. The art lover Jacobsen commissioned two reliefs which now adorn the façade of the latter. Aarsleff was also involved in the decoration of Copenhagen's law courts. He was appointed a member of the Kunstakademi of Copenhagen in ...

Article

Belgian, 19th – 20th century, male.

Sculptor. Busts.

A. Aarts showed an ivory sculpture representing a Head of a Laughing Child at the Brussels Exhibition in 1897.

Article

Spanish, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born in Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman. Figures, genre scenes, landscapes.

Juan Abreu painted landscapes and made miniatures, designs and sculptures. Spain provided the subjects for his work.

Article

French, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 13 March 1871, in Abzac (Gironde); died 1934.

Sculptor. Busts.

Achard was a pupil of Falguière and made his debut at the Salon de Paris in 1894. He became a member, gaining a third medal in 1903 and a silver medal in ...

Article

Chiara Stefani

In 

Article

Jennifer Wingate

[née Pond, Adeline Valentine]

(b Boston, MA, Oct 24, 1859; d Brooklyn, NY, July 1, 1948).

American critic and author. Adams was a vocal proponent of American sculpture during the last decades of civic sculpture’s golden age. She expressed her views on the state of the field in two significant publications, The Spirit of American Sculpture (1923; reissued in 1929) and a chapter in the 1930 edition of Lorado Taft’s History of American Sculpture, as well as in regular contributions to the American Magazine of Art.

Adams was an artist herself, though writing claimed her full attention. While she was in Paris in 1887, she posed for the sculptor Herbert Adams, whom she married two years later. The resulting marble bust (1889; New York, Hisp. Soc. America) was exhibited at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, an exposition that Adams hailed for fostering a new ideal of collaboration between architects and sculptors. Adams praised the role that sculpture played in public life and promoted figurative work modeled in the French academic tradition. She admired artists like Daniel Chester French (...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 28 January 1858, in West Concord; died 1945.

Sculptor.

Herbert Adams attended the Massachusetts Normal School of Art in Boston and completed his studies with Mercié in Paris. During his five years in Paris he sculpted his first marble bust, that of his fiancée, Miss Adeline V. Pond. This work earned him a reputation for elegant sculpture and was the start of his fame. He became a member of the Académie Nationale de Dessin. Adams exhibited in Paris, where in ...

Article

Janet A. Headley

(b West Concord, VT, Jan 28, 1858; d New York, NY, May 21, 1945).

American sculptor. Raised in Fitchburg, MA, he trained at the Institute of Technology in Worcester (subsequently Worcester Polytechnic Institute), the Massachusetts Normal Art School in Boston (now the Massachusetts College of Art and Design) and the Maryland Institute of Art in Baltimore, following an artistic path that mirrored that of many of his contemporaries. Arriving in Paris around 1885, he found a mentor in Antonin Mercié (1845–1916), whose accomplished bronzes evoke Italian Renaissance prototypes. He briefly established his own studio in Paris in 1888, and from 1890 to 1895 he taught at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

Adams won important commissions for public monuments in Boston (clergyman William Ellery Channing, 1904) and New York (William Cullen Bryant, 1911). The latter, located on the grounds of the New York Public Library, features a dignified seated portrait of the poet, editor and advocate of Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum; architect Thomas Hastings (...

Article

Sergey Kuznetsov

[Amand (Ivanovich)]

(b Uuga Rätsepa, nr Paldiski, Nov 12, 1855; d Paldiski, June 26, 1929).

Estonian sculptor. From childhood he excelled in wood-carving. His first serious work after graduating from the St Petersburg Academy of Arts, where he studied (1876–81) under Alexander Bock (1829–95), was a carved frame for Johann Köler’s painting Tribute to Caesar (1883; Tallinn, A. Mus.), commissioned by several Estonian art associations on the occasion of the coronation of Alexander III (reg 1881–94). This work was inspired by Adamson’s impressions of altars in 17th-century churches in Tallinn. Baroque motifs became an important feature of his work, as in his allegorical miniatures Dawn and Dusk (1895; Tallinn, A. Mus.), carved from pear wood. Adamson completed his studies in Paris, where he was influenced by the works of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux and Jules Dalou. A theme that runs through his smaller works is the sea, as in the Boat’s Last Breath (wax, 1899; biscuit, 1901, executed at the ...

Article

German, 20th century, male.

Born 1878, in Laupheim (Württemberg); died 1942, in Hamburg, during deportation.

Painter, stucco artist. Designs (metal objects/leather objects/jewellery).

Jugendstil.

Friedrich Adler studied at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Munich from 1894 to 1898, then became a pupil of the Debschitz Schule in Munich (the famous school founded by Wilhelm Debschitz and Hermann Obrist) as soon as it opened in ...