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Morgan Falconer

(b Mie, 1969).

British painter of Japanese birth. She studied at Wimbledon School of Art, London (1991–2) and Goldsmiths’ College, London (1993–5). Hasegawa came to prominence in the mid-1990s with large cut-out tableaux which bear idealized images of young people. Constructed from MDF and painted in gloss, they resemble displays from store windows. Initially she based her work on images of models that she took from magazines: Untitled (1995; see Artforum, 1996, p. 38) is a monumental depiction of an already tall female model who teeters on one foot. Hasegawa’s interest in glamour soon gave way to a preoccupation with the standardization of ideal youths in commercial advertizing imagery, and to examine this further she began to use her friends as models. Many of her figures stand alone, such as Boy in White T-Shirt (1996; see 1997 exh. cat., p. 68): the well-built, healthy looking youth smiles, appearing relaxed in a T-shirt; the schematic, illustrative style of cartoons lends him definition and a pale palette colours him. Some figures appear in groups and suggest narrative: ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Hong Kong, Oct 10, 1963).

British painter. She completed a foundation course at Croydon College of Art (1983–4), and a BFA at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1984–7). Her reputation was quickly established; a year after her inclusion in the exhibition Freeze (curated by fellow artist Damien Hirst in 1988), she showed at the Waddington Galleries in London. She was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 1991, and in 1993 for the Austrian Eliette Von Karajan Prize for Young Painters. Rae makes highly coloured, vivid abstract paintings that draw on and develop a variety of formal, painterly motifs. Common to all her work is the self-conscious juxtaposition of flat areas of colour with dragged, daubed or scumbled paint marks. Although her compositions can appear accidental, almost arbitrary, close inspection reveals a highly controlled handling of paint and style and a tight underlying structure. As her work developed throughout the 1990s it became still more structured, and focused in a more condensed manner on certain motifs. ...

Article

John-Paul Stonard

(b Tokyo, July 20, 1966).

Japanese installation artist active in England. She studied painting at the Tama Art University, Tokyo (1985–9), and then moved to London to take a foundation course (1990–91) and complete a BFA at Goldsmiths’ College, London (1991–4), followed by postgraduate study in sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, London (1994–6). From 1997–8 she was an Associate Research Student at Goldsmiths’ College, London. She achieved widespread recognition after winning the seventh EAST International Exhibition Prize in 1997, and in 2000 was shortlisted for the Turner Prize. She had her first solo exhibition, Company Deal, at Claydon Heeley International, Battersea, London, in 1997. In her complex and cluttered installations Takahashi raises questions concerning technology and consumerism, obsolescence and waste, order and chaos. Her installation Line Out (1998; mixed media, London, Saatchi Gal.), which formed the central work for the exhibition New Neurotic Realism...