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Ettore Spalletti

(b Siena, March 1, 1817; d Florence, Jan 10, 1882).

Italian sculptor and writer. He was among the foremost sculptors in Tuscany in the generation after Lorenzo Bartolini. His early experiments in naturalism attracted such hostile criticism that he was forced to abandon this style in favour of a sensual neo-Greek manner. His later works are marked by a richly expressive eclecticism.

He trained with his father, a wood-carver, and briefly attended the Istituto di Belle Arti in Siena. By 1826 or 1827 he was in Florence, where he joined the workshop of the wood-carver Paolo Sani. Dupré alternated this work with practical attempts at teaching himself, particularly drawing, as part of his ambition to become a sculptor. His first proper sculpture, a wooden figure of St Philomena, was shown in 1838 at the annual exhibition of the Accademia di Belle Arti, Florence, where it attracted the praise of Lorenzo Bartolini, among others. In 1840 he made a jewel casket, inspired by the interior architecture of the Biblioteca Medicea-Laurenziana, Florence, which was acquired by ...

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B. M. Kirikov, S. G. Fyodorov, and Jeremy Howard

Russian family of artists. The architect (1) Vasily Stasov was an eminent exponent of Neo-classicism. His son (2) Vladimir Stasov became a leading critic with democratic views and a champion of Realism in art.

(b Moscow, Aug 4, 1769; d St Petersburg, Sept 5, 1848).

Architect. One of the last great masters of the St Petersburg Neo-classical school along with Karl Rossi and Auguste Ricard Montferrand (1786–1858), he continued and perfected the traditions of Neo-classical monumentality and plasticity earlier developed by Ivan Starov (1745–1808), Andreyan Zakharov and Thomas-Jean de Thomon. Stasov’s buildings were characterized by strength and austerity, geometrical qualities and striking contrasts between the smoothness of the walls and the spatial, decisive quality of the order. As a rule he modified the forms of the most austere and monumental of the Classical orders: the Greek Doric. In striving for an original interpretation of traditional methods, he examined local urban planning and the natural landscape. Stasov mastered a wide range of styles; he designed both domestic buildings and ceremonial palace interiors, created large-scale buildings and introduced new metal constructions....

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B. M. Kirikov and S. G. Fyodorov

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