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Simon Anderson

Not a movement so much as an attitude or artistic position bound up with Modernism itself, anti-art is opposition to art from within: negative responses by artists to coercive constraints or perceived orthodoxy in the creative realm. Dada and Fluxus were groups closely associated with anti-art, but as a contrarian attitude rather than a movement, it has taken many forms since the late 19th century, from a rhetorical proposition to a life of dedicated activism. Although not aligned with religious iconophobia or fundamentalist iconoclasm; destruction, political action, and impiety are among common characteristics, along with often acerbic humor. Born of Modernism, at the extremity of those rejections or refusals that shaped and closed the era, anti-art shadowed and made visible some contradictions in aesthetics and in capitalist culture.

Insults to convention were common by 1896, when Stephane Mallarme’s poem Un Coup de Des audaciously broke the rules of prosody and Alfred Jarry’s ...

Article

Belgian, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1949, in Gosselies.

Painter, draughtsman, designer, sculptor, engraver.

Coppee trained at the École des Beaux-Arts in Brussels. His works, some of which exhibit the hallmarks of a Dadaist approach, retain a naive spontaneity. He has also produced frescoes and stained glass windows....

Article

Chinese, 20th – 21st century, male.

Active in France from 1989.

Born 1954, in Xiamen (Fujian).

Installation artist.

Conceptual Art.

Huang Yongping graduated from the fine arts academy of Zhejiang in 1982. He was active in the Xiamen Dada group. He left China for Paris in ...

Article

Morgan Falconer

(b Los Angeles, CA, 1960).

American sculptor. Kersels graduated with a BA from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1984, and later returned to the same institution to take an MA (1993–5). From 1984 to 1993 he was a member of a neo-Dada performance group, SHRIMPS, and this clearly influenced his sculpture, both in terms of its echos of performance and its tone of light-hearted absurdity and futility. His photographic series Tossing a Friend (Melinda 1, 2 and 3) (1996; see 1998 exh. cat.) is indicative of his interest in the consequences of accidental movement: a woman is shown, in various positions, being thrown in the air by the artist. Objects of the Dealer (1995; see Pagel, 1995) suggests a more critical edge to his anarchic humour: all the mechanical and electrical components on an art dealer’s desk were wired up to different microcassettes and whenever they were used music would come from some of the 26 speakers. His well-known ...

Article

Yugoslav, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1953.

Painter.

Zeljko Kipke lives and works in Zagreb. An art critic and theoretician he has been influenced by Malevich, Dada, Magritte, medieval frescoes and Byzantine art. He reproduces geometric shapes, fragments of machines, cylinders, pistons, wheels, freely interpreting them in order to come up with motifs detached from their context which appear to float across the canvas. He has shown his works at several solo exhibitions, notably at the Castres contemporary art centre in France in ...

Article

Mile  

French, 20th – 21st century, female.

Born 1951.

Painter.

Groupe Art-cloche.

Mile is self-taught. In the early 1980s in Paris, she was associated with activities promoted by Art Cloche, an informal group taking its cue from Dada and Fluxus that lived in a squat.

Art cloche. Élément pour une rétrospective. Squatt artistique...

Article

Montage  

Tom Williams

Term that refers to the technique of organizing various images into a single composition in both film and visual art. It is also frequently applied to musical and literary works that emphasize fragmentation and paratactic construction. In film, the term typically refers to the organization of individual shots to create a larger structure or narrative. This technique was developed most systematically by the film makers of the 1920s Russian avant-garde such as Sergey Eisenstein (1898–1948), Lev Kuleshov (1899–1970), and Vsevolod Pudovkin (1893–1953). In visual art, the term refers to the juxtaposition of disparate images in Collage and particularly Photomontage. Although this use of montage has a number of historical precursors, it was developed primarily in the 1910s and 1920s by artists associated with Dada, Surrealism, and Russian Constructivism such as George Grosz, John Heartfield, Hannah Höch, and Aleksandr Rodchenko. During the period after World War II, the technique became an increasingly routine practice in both advertising and the fine arts. In the late 20th century it has been most associated with the work of such figures as ...

Article

French, 20th – 21st century, male.

Born 1954, in St-Malo.

Painter.

Groupe Art-cloche.

Damien Nouet is self-taught. He was active in the Art-cloche circle in Paris at the beginning of the 1980s, an informal group drawing inspiration from Dada and Fluxus.

Paris, 30 Jan 1989: End of a Dream...

Article

American, 20th–21st century, female.

Born 12 October 1939, in Fox Chase (Pennsylvania).

Performance artist, assemblage artist, installation artist, video artist. Multimedia.

Neo-Dadaism, Feminist Art, Body Art.

Carolee Schneemann received a BA from Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, and an MFA from the University of Illinois. She also studied at Columbia University School of Painting and Sculpture, New York; the New School for Social Research; and Universidad de Puebla, Mexico. She has taught at the University of Illinois (...

Article

Canadian, 20th–21st century, male.

Born 29 September 1946, in Vancouver.

Photomontage artist, photographer.

Jeff Wall studied art history and wrote a thesis on Dada photo montage, receiving a PhD from the Courtauld Institute in London. In 1987 he began teaching at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, where he lives. Conceptual at first, works like ...

Article

Melissa Chiu

revised by Mael Bellec

(b Xiamen, Feb 19, 1954. d Ivry-sur-Seine, Oct 19, 2019).

Chinese installation artist, active also in France. Huang Yong Ping studied at the Zhejiang Fine Arts Academy (now the China Academy of Art) in Hangzhou, graduating in 1982. In 1986 he became one of the founders of Xiamen Dada, a group of artists famous for having burned their paintings after an exhibition (e.g. Event, 1986). This performance event and the group’s other activities were part of a broader national trend—known as the 1985 New Wave Movement—when a younger generation of artists began to experiment with all manner of styles and influences from outside China. Inspired by Chan Buddhism, Dadaism, John Cage, and Joseph Beuys’s works, Huang Yong Ping stood out for his conceptual approach and professed wariness toward art as a set value and a predefined concept. This philosophy led him to notably use chance and divination methods in his creation processes (e.g. Roulette Wheel: Four Paintings Created According to Random Instructions...