61-80 of 508 Results  for:

  • 1000–300 BCE x
Clear all

Article

Arcesilaus III  

5th century, male.

Active at Paros, probably during the 5th century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Arcesilaus is mentioned by Pliny the Elder, along with Polygnotus of Thasos and Nicanor of Paros, as a painter in encaustic. He may be the same person as Arcesilaus I....

Article

Archedemus of Thera  

5th century, male.

Active in Attica in the second half of the 5th century BC.

Stone worker, sculptor (?).

Ancient Greek.

Archedemus was involved with the transformation of one of the largest natural grottoes to the south of Mount Hymettus (near the modern village of Vari) into a sanctuary dedicated to Pan, the Nymphs and the Charites (the Graces). At the foot of the central wall of the grotto, Archedemus has depicted himself (?) in his working clothes, with his pointed hammer and set square....

Article

Archelaus (Son of Apollonius)  

3rd century, male.

Active at the end of the 3rd century BC.

Born to a family originally from Priene.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

The relief known as the Apotheosis of Homer, discovered in the 18th century on the Appian Way near Bovillae and now in the British Museum, is signed by Archelaus. The relief shows a festival celebrating Homer at the Museum in Alexandria. The enthroned Homer, flanked by his daughters the Immortals, receives a sacrifice performed by a poetic procession of costumed figures (capitals supporting a canopy imply that this is a kind of theatrical performance). The figures are named: Historia (History), Mythos (Myth), Poiesis (Poetry), Tragoedia (Tragedy), Komoedia (Comedy), followed by a group formed by Physis (Nature), Arete (Virtue), Mneme (Memory), Pistis (Faith) and Sophia (Wisdom). Above the scene appear the gods: Zeus at the top, then Apollo with his lyre and the Muses in a ring. The two most unusual figures are those standing behind Homer and crowning him: Cronus and Licoumene (symbols of sovereignty over time and space) carved in the likenesses of Ptolemy IV Philopator and his wife Arsinoe III. Portraits of the royal couple existing on coins make this identification certain and date the relief to the last years of the 3rd century BC (probably 206-205). The way in which the Muses are depicted, probably inspired by the group made by Philiscus of Rhodes, and the very simple landscape provided as a background to the scene (the side of a mountain) would fit such a date. Various suggestions for the destination of the relief have been put forward. The presence, on the right-hand side of the grotto where Apollo is standing, of a statue of a poet with a tripod behind seems to indicate that the work is a dedication from a prize-winning poet....

Article

Archenides  

6th century, male.

Vase painter.

Ancient Greek.

The signature Archenides [made] me ( Archeneides me) appears on both sides of an Attic black-figure cup.

Article

Archermus (Son of Micciades)  

6th century, male.

Active probably towards the end of the 1st half of the 6th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Chios.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Archermus was one of a family from Chios descended, according to Pliny, from a certain Melas (though this may be Melas the son of Poseidon and a nymph, the hero and mythical founder of the town). We do know that Archermus' father was Micciades, and that his sons were Boupalus and Athenis. According to Pliny, Archermus achieved fame in Lesbos and Delos. A base, apparently supporting a sphinx or griffin and signed by Micciades and Archermus, was found at Delos. Attempts to link this base with a winged goddess also found at Delos and known for a long time as the ...

Article

Archestratus I  

3rd century, male.

Active in the Hellenistic period (second half of the 3rd century BC).

Born in Athens.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

A sculpture in Rhodes dedicated to Athena Polias and Zeus Polieus by Rhodocles, son of Aristander, was signed by Archestratus.

Article

Archicles  

6th century, male.

Active in Attica in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Potter, vase painter (?).

Ancient Greek.

The signature of Archicles sometimes appears alongside that of Glaucytes. Little of his own work remains.

Article

Aregon  

7th – 6th century, male.

Active in the Archaic period.

Born to a family originally from Corinth.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

A painting of Artemis on a Griffin by Aregon once existed in the temple of Artemis Alpheionia, not far from Olympia.

Article

Argeiadas  

5th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

School of Argos.

Argeiadas was a son (or perhaps slave?) and follower of Ageladas (Argive School). Together with Asopodorus and Athanodorus he is associated with the Argive artist Atotus on the base of an ex-voto (offering made in fulfilment of a vow) at Olympia offered by Praxiteles from Camarina between 484 and 480 (?) BC....

Article

Aridices  

7th century, male.

Pliny mentions Aridices in his list of the earliest Greek painters, saying that he was one of those who perfected the linear technique. Without yet using colour, he appears to have added an internal drawing to the simple silhouette (see for comparison Attic lekythoi (oil flasks) painted on a white background)....

Article

Aristander I  

5th – 4th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th and beginning of the 4th century BC.

Born in Paros.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Aristander may be the father of the great Skopas. He worked on one of the two large tripods offered by the Spartans at Amyclae after the battle of Aegospotami (405 BC), while Polyclitus the Elder (?) is said to have worked on the second. The figure supporting Aristander' tripod was a ...

Article

Aristides I  

5th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

We know from Pliny that Aristides specialised in carving two- and four-horse chariots (bigae and quadrigae). No works remain that can be definitely attributed to him. Pausanias mentions an Aristides who, according to a certain Cleoitas, worked on the decoration of the ...

Article

Aristides II  

5th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Aristides lived at the time of the Peloponnesian War, at the end of the 5th century BC. He is the presumed painter of a series of images of warriors who died in the battle of Delium in 424 BC, described as being represented on steles by incised outlines against silhouettes. The incised and painted steles by Mnason, Rhynchon and Sangenes may give an idea of what his work was like....

Article

Aristides, the Elder  

4th century, male.

Active in the first half of the 4th century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

According to Pliny, Aristides the Elder was a pupil of Euxenidas. Some scholars identify him with the sculptor of the same name who was a follower of Polyclitus and therefore from Sicyon. Aristides the painter was more likely from Thebes, and the founder (in Athens?) of a famous school, or perhaps just the initiator of a school in Athens where not only his sons Nicerus and Ariston II were trained, but also Antorides and Euphranor. Later writers criticised Aristides the Elder for his rather harsh colour, but nevertheless recognise that it was he who invented the encaustic technique (which Praxiteles was to perfect). His work marks the introduction of the 'pathetic' in painting (compare with Skopas for sculpture). ...

Article

Aristides, the Younger  

4th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 4th century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Probably the son of Ariston II and grandson of Aristides the Elder, Aristides is mentioned, along with Nicomachus and Nicias, as one of the artists active around 330 BC. He seems to have been the younger brother and pupil of Nicomachus. He painted a portrait of Epicurus' mistress ...

Article

Aristion  

6th century, male.

Born to a family originally from Paros.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Like many other Ionian artists of the period, Aristion must have emigrated westwards, driven by the threatening Persians. The base of a funerary monument to Phrasicleia, dating from the second half of the 6th century BC and found at Mesogea in Attica, bears his signature. In Athens, his name appears (without the place name) on the base of Antilochus' ...

Article

Aristocleides  

4th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Described by Pliny as amongst the primis proximi (next to the top rank), Aristocleides made paintings for the new (?) temple to Apollo at Delphi pinxit aedem.

Article

Aristocles I  

6th century, male.

Active in Attica at the end of the 6th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

The famous funerary stele commemorating the hoplite (heavy-armed soldier) Aristion, dating from the last quarter of the century, is signed by Aristocles. His name appears again on an Attic inscription found at Hieraka....

Article

Aristocles II  

6th century, male.

Active in the second half of the 6th century BC.

Born in Sicyon.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Aristocles was the brother of the celebrated artist Canachus. He is thought to be the father of Cleoitas and grandfather of Aristocles IV. His followers were Synnoon of Aegina and his son Ptolichus. An epigram by Antipater of Sidon tells us that he collaborated with Canachus and Ageladas on a group showing three Muses. He made a ...

Article

Aristocles III  

6th century, male.

Active in Sicyon.

Born to a family originally from Cydonia (Crete).

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Pausanias names Aristocles as one of the earliest artists and says that he was born before Zancle became Messana (which is to say, before 494 BC). Aristocles of Cydonia was commissioned by Evagoras of Zancle to make a statue for Olympia. It was a group showing Heracles struggling to seize the belt from an Amazon on horseback. Nothing remains of this work, although a fragment of marble bearing the inscription ...