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Androcydes  

5th – 4th century, male.

Born to a family originally from Cyzicus.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Androcydes was a rival of Zeuxis. In c. 380 BC he painted a Battle between Horsemen for Thebes. Also attributed to him is a painting of Scylla surrounded by beautifully executed and lifelike fish. (Legend had it that Androcydes particularly liked fish.)...

Article

Androsthenes  

4th century, male.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Born in Athens and a pupil of Eucadmus, Androsthenes completed the groups of figures begun by Praxias on the pediment of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi.

Article

Angelion  

6th century, male.

Angelion is believed to have been a pupil of the Cretan masters Dipoinus and Scyllis. In collaboration with Tectaeus he carried out an enormous Apollo (still in existence in the 2nd century BC) for the Porinos Naos. According to Athenagoras he also made an ...

Article

Antenor (Son of Eumares)  

6th century, male.

Active probably in Athens.

Sculptor (stone/bronze).

Ancient Greek, Archaic Period.

The figure of Antenor dominates the history of the fine arts of the Attica of his time. Around 506 BC, he was commissioned by Cleisthenes to make a bronze group of the ...

Article

Antenorides, Pliny  

4th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Pliny Antenorides was, with Euphranor, a follower of Aristides - though not Aristides the famous painter of the time of Alexander but probably the grandfather of the latter and an architect, sculptor and painter. Nothing is known of the works of Antenorides....

Article

Antidotus  

4th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

A pupil of Euphranor, Antidotus was to be the master of the Athenian painter Nicias (which would seem to indicate that he was Athenian, or at least worked in Athens). Attributed to him are a Warrior with Shield, a ...

Article

Antidotus  

3rd century, male.

Active in the first half of the 3rd century BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

In 282 BC, Antidotus decorated the proscenium of the theatre at Delos with two paintings, for which he received 200 drachmas.

Article

Antigonus  

3rd century, male.

Born to a family originally from Carystus (Euboea).

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

As a young man Antigonus was a pupil of the old philosopher Menedemus in Eretria, after which he began to move around. Around 270 BC, he seems to have arrived in Athens, then moving on to Delphi, Elis and Cos, until c. 241 BC( ?) when he was summoned by Attalus I to Pergamum. While there he collaborated on a number of monumental groups designed to celebrate victories over the Gauls. It is not clear exactly what his contribution consisted of. A number of mutilated signatures that might be his could equally well be those of Isogonus or Epigonus. Antigonus was also a writer and Pliny used his books on painting and sculpture. It is likely that Polemon's text ...

Article

Antiphanes I  

5th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th century BC.

Born to a family originally from Ceramicus (the potters' quarter of Athens).

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Antiphanes worked on the frieze of the Erechtheum. His name appears on the register of payments for 408/407 BC....

Article

Antiphanes II  

5th – 4th century, male.

Active in Argos at the end of the 5th century and beginning of the 4th century BC.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Antiphanes was connected with the school of Polyclitus through his master Periclytus. His own follower was Cleon of Sicyon. According to Pausanias, Antiphanes made an effigy of the ...

Article

Antiphidas (Son of Diognetus)  

3rd century, male.

Active in the first half of the 3rd century BC.

Born to a family originally from Nisyrus.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Antiphidas is known from an inscription on the Acropolis of Lindos datable to c. 272 BC (a votive statue dedicated to Athena Lindia and Zeus Polieus by Pausanias, son of Agathagetus, and Polydorus)....

Article

Antiphilus I  

4th century, male.

Active in the Hellenistic era.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Born in Egypt, Antiphilus was a pupil of Ctesidemus. A rival of Apelles, he is said to have slandered him to Ptolemy, becoming his slave as a result. Like Apelles, Antiphilus painted official portraits, generally of an idealised kind: ...

Article

Apellas  

5th – 4th century, male.

Active at the end of the 5th and beginning of the 4th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Apellas may be the same person as Apelleas, son of Callicles, a Megaran artist of the school of Theocosmus and follower of Phidias. Pliny tells us that Apellas made the ...

Article

Apelles (son of Pytheas)  

4th century BC, male.

Born to a family originally from Colophon (Lydia).

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

School of Sicyon.

Apelles is considered to be the most important artist of the Sicyon school. His father, Pytheas, appears to have belonged to the illustrious line of Ionian silversmiths, and his brother Ctesilochus (or Ctesiochus) was also a painter. After a period as a pupil of the Ephesian Ephorus, Apelles took lessons with Pamphilus, master of the famous Sicyon school. These years of apprenticeship allowed him to acquire a secure technique without stifling his Ionian temperament. Instead, his very personal genius was able to develop. Around 340 BC, when he was about 30 (?), Apelles went to Macedonia, the birthplace of Pamphilus, and there became court painter to Philip and Alexander. Alexander granted him exclusive permission, along with the sculptor Lysippus and the engraver Pyrgoteles, to reproduce his image. After this foray into Asia, he returned to Ionia, when he took Ephesian (...

Article

Apollodorus  

5th century, male.

Active in Athensc.430-415 BC.

Painter.

Ancient Greek, Classical Period.

Traditionally held to be the true pioneer of great painting, Apollodorus is said to have painted on wooden panels using water mixed with egg yolk. Agatharchus had already experimented with perspective and attempted with his theatre scenes to convey an illusion of reality, but Apollodorus seems to have been the first to render correctly the fall of shadows and to use the interplay of light and shade both in landscapes and figures. Plutarch notes how he made use of subtle colours that shaded into one another....

Article

Apollodorus I  

5th – 4th century, male.

Sculptor in bronze.

Ancient Greek.

Pliny mentions Apollodorus as producing statues of the philosophers, relating how, with his insatiable appetite for perfection, he destroyed most of his works as soon as they were completed, earning himself the nickname of 'the madman'. Silanion's portrait of Apollodorus is said to have accurately captured the sculptor's bizarre character, but nothing else is known of this portrait that was supposed to have been copied for the bust of ...

Article

Apollonius I of Magnesia  

3rd – 2nd century, male.

Active in the Hellenistic period.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Apollonius' name appears on a base found at Delos in front of the great Propylaea. It once supported a piece dedicated by the Islanders' League and dates from the end of the 3rd or the beginning of the 2nd century BC....

Article

Apollonius II (Son of Archias)  

3rd century, male.

Active in the Hellenistic period.

Born to a family originally from Marathon.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Apollonius' name appears on a base from Athens. From the letter forms it can be dated to the 3rd century BC. There is also a signature of Archias, son of Apollonius. It is likely that Apollonius VI also belonged to this family of sculptors....

Article

Arcesilas (Son of Tisicrates)  

4th century, male.

Painter.

Ancient Greek.

Arcesilas belongs to the Sicyon School. His father was probably the indirect follower of Lysippus. Arcesilas must be the Arcesilaus mentioned by Pausanias as having painted Leosthenes Surrounded by his Children for the sanctuary of Zeus and Athena at Piraeus....

Article

Arcesilaus I (Son of Aristodicus)  

5th century, male.

Active Paros, probably active during the first half of the 5th century BC.

Sculptor.

Ancient Greek.

Simonides composed an epigram about an Artemis by Arcesilaus, who received 200 Parian drachmas for his work. Possibly the same person as Arcesilaus III.