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Article

Japanese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1737; died 1812.

Painter.

Gyokuzan was a painter from Osaka. He was promoted to the rank of hokkyo, a title meaning ‘bridge of Buddhist law’ initially given to Buddhist monks but later becoming an honorific given to other worthy members of society, such as artists. He illustrated many historical narratives, notably the ...

Article

Japanese, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 19 March 1852, in Edo (Tokyo); died 10 October 1934, in Tokyo.

Sculptor. Buddhist subjects. Wood carving, bronze and metalwork.

Takamura Koun exhibited in Paris including at the 1900 Exposition Universelle, where he received a bronze medal. He sought to preserve the art of traditional Japanese wood carving....

Article

Japanese, 19th century, male.

Active in Kyoto.

Born 1823; died 1864.

Painter.

Tamechika painted Buddhist subjects and figures. He first studied Kano style painting before switching to classic Yamato-e . He came under the influence of Ukita Ikkei. He was murdered by a wandering samurai in Tambaichi, Yamato....

Article

Chinese, 19th century, female.

Active c. 1800.

Born in Wuxi (Jiangsu).

Painter.

Wang Yunxiang, a Buddhist nun, painted orchids.

Article

Wu Zi  

Chinese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1755, in Quanjiao (Anhui); died 1821.

Painter.

Wu Zi painted Buddhist and Taoist figures in the style of Wu Daozi and Wang Guang.

Article

Xugu  

Chinese, 19th century, male.

Born 1824, in Yangzhou (Jiangsu); died 1896.

Painter, calligrapher. Animals, flowers, fruit.

After serving in the state army against the Taiping rebels, Xugu retired and became a Buddhist monk around 1850. He was a calligrapher and a traditional scholar painter and was known for his paintings of flowers, fruit and goldfish....