1-10 of 10 results  for:

  • Religious Art x
  • Medieval Art x
  • Interior Design and Furniture x
  • Sculpture and Carving x
Clear all

Article

Italian, 15th century, male.

Active at the end of the 15th century.

Sculptor. Religious subjects. Decorative schemes.

Venetian School.

According to records, from 1462 to 1486 Pier Antonio dell'Abate, together with the brothers Lorenzo and Cristoforo Canozi da Lendinara, produced woodcarvings for stalls in the churches of S Antonio in Padua, Santa in Monta in Venice and S Francisco in Treviso. Elements of his work can still be found in Ferrara....

Article

German, 16th century, male.

Died probably, in Odense, Denmark.

Sculptor (wood). Religious furnishings (altars).

Lübeck School.

Claus Berg made the altar for the Franciscan church at Odense in Denmark in about 1520. Berg was summoned to Odense by Queen Christina, and while there he married. An altar in Lübeck showing the Holy Family has been attributed to him, as well as an altar in Bregninge....

Article

Flemish School, 15th – 16th century, male.

Active in Brussels.

Sculptor (wood). Religious furnishings (altars).

Brussels School.

Jan Borreman was the head of a famous studio in Brussels producing retables in a style that was flamboyant and, in its expressiveness, akin to the painting of Rogier Van der Weyden. In around ...

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born 1509, in Gandino near Bergamo; died 1579, in Madrid, in 1569 according to the Larousse Dictionary.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman (including wash), architect, decorative artist, art restorer. Religious subjects, historical subjects, mythological subjects. Wall decorations, frescoes.

After a study trip to Rome, paid for by his protector Tobia Pallavicini, Giovanni Battista Castello (Il Bergamasco) produced a series of works in Genoa and Bergamo. His best-known works in Bergamo include the fresco ...

Article

Italian, 15th century, male.

Born 5 June 1436, in Lucca; died 12 October 1501, in Lucca.

Sculptor, architect. Religious furnishings (altars).

Florentine School.

Matteo Civitali was a pupil of Antonio Rossellino, then worked with his master in Florence. He was responsible for introducing printing to Lucca. His work as an architect includes the Palazzo Pretorio in Lucca: its plans are attributed to him. He was a humanist, and his first works as a sculptor were representations of humanists of his day: ...

Article

French, 15th century, male.

Sculptor, painter. Religious subjects. Decorative schemes.

From 1462 to 1481 Jacquet Cordonnier II worked for Troyes Cathedral, carving, among other things, Cain and Abel for the porch, and figures of angels, St Peter, and a crucifix for a reliquary. In 1486...

Article

German, 15th century, male.

Engraver, painter. Religious subjects. Religious furnishings (altars).

He worked in Bamberg at the end of the 15th century. He was previously presumed to have been the same artist as Lucas Cranach, but today this assumption is contested. He was, however, certainly influenced by the art of Franconia....

Article

Italian, 15th – 16th century, male.

Active from 1515 in France.

Born 15 April 1452, in Anchiano, near Vinci; died 2 May 1519, in Clos-Lucé, near Amboise, France.

Painter, sculptor, draughtsman, architect, engineer. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, portraits, topographic subjects, anatomical studies.

Leonardo da Vinci was the illegitimate son of the Florentine notary Ser Piero da Vinci, who married Albiera di Giovanni Amadori, the daughter of a patrician family, in the year Leonardo was born. Little is known about the artist’s natural mother, Caterina, other than that five years after Leonardo’s birth she married an artisan from Vinci named Chartabriga di Piero del Veccha. Leonardo was raised in his father’s home in Vinci by his paternal grandfather, Ser Antonio. Giorgio Vasari discusses Leonardo’s childhood at length, noting his aptitude for drawing and his taste for natural history and mathematics. Probably around 1470, Leonardo’s father apprenticed him to Andrea del Verrocchio; two years later, Leonardo’s name appears in the register of Florentine painters. Although officially a painter in his own right, Leonardo remained for a further five years or so in Verrocchio’s workshop, where Lorenzo di Credi and Pietro Perugino numbered among his fellow students....

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born 6 March 1475, in Caprese, near Arezzo; died 18 February 1564, in Rome.

Painter, draughtsman, sculptor, architect, engineer, poet. Religious subjects, mythological subjects, nudes, portraits.

At the time of Michelangelo’s birth, his father, Ludovico, son of Leonardo Buonarroti Simoni, was resident magistrate for the Republic of Florence in the small, fortified town of Caprese, but soon after the family returned to Florence. Michelangelo lost his mother when he was six years old, and the family’s financial situation was poor, though previous generations of Buonarroti had been rich and powerful and among the ‘priori’, or governing councillors, of Florence. Michelangelo’s father would therefore have preferred a business career for his son, but Michelangelo was encouraged by his friend Francesco Granacci in his artistic ambitions. He prevailed over his father, and on 1 April 1488, at the age of 13, he joined the large workshop of the painters Domenico and Davide Ghirlandaio. His apprenticeship agreement bound him to them for three years....

Article

Italian, 16th century, male.

Born 1525, in Trentino Alto Adige; died 27 May 1608, in Venice.

Sculptor, medallist, decorative designer. Mythological subjects, religious subjects. Busts.

Venetian School.

Alessandro Vittoria settled in Venice in 1543 and was apprenticed to Jacopo Sansovino. Vittoria's first (unfinished) statue, a ...