Show Summary Details

Page of
PRINTED FROM Oxford Art Online. © Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single article in Oxford Art Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy).

Baptisterylocked

  • Annabel Jane Wharton

Extract

Building used for the rite of baptism into the Christian Church. In late antiquity the term baptisterium or baptisterion (Lat. baptizare: ‘to dip under water’), which designated a swimming bath (e.g. Pliny the younger: Letters II.xvii.11), was applied to the baptismal piscina or font and then to the whole structure in which baptism took place. With the Eucharist, baptism was a central sacrament in the Early Christian Church. The ritual was prescribed by Christ (John 3:5; Matthew 28:19) and modelled after his own baptism by St John the Baptist. The meaning of baptism was established by St Paul: by participating in Christ’s death and resurrection through baptism, the believer was cleansed of his sins and admitted to the body of the Church (1 Corinthians 6:11, 12:13; Romans 6:4). By the ...

You do not currently have access to this article

Login

Please login to access the full content.

Subscribe

Access to the full content requires a subscription

Studies in the History of Art
M. Restle and K. Wessel, eds: Reallexikon zur byzantinischen Kunst (Stuttgart, 1966–)
J. P. Migne, ed.: Patrologiae cursus completus patres ecclesiae Latine (Paris, 1844–64)