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Martine Reid

Native American Haida sculptor, metalworker, printmaker and blanket-maker. He was the grandson of the Haida blanket- and basket-maker Florence Davidson (1895–1993), and great-grandson of the Haida wood-carver Charles Edenshaw. He began carving argillite as a teenager in Masset, and in 1966 he met ...

Article

Navajo  

Margaret Moore Booker

Tribe of Native Americans who call themselves Diné (“the people”) and whose Dinetah (homelands) are situated on a c. 15 million-acre-reservation in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico and southern Utah. The Navajo have rich artistic traditions in the Southwest dating back at least five centuries. Greatly influenced by Pueblo Indians of the region, the Navajo made textiles, basketry and pottery for utilitarian and religious purposes. Traditionally, it was the Navajo women who made pottery and wove textiles, while the men were silversmiths. The latter, who learned this art from the Spanish, led the way in the development of silver and turquoise jewelry in the Southwest. Their forms and decorative styles influenced other Native American jewelers....

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Frederick J. Dockstader

Native American Hopi weaver and painter. The daughter of an Anglo mother and a Hopi father, she is one of the most complicated personalities in contemporary Native American art. She attended Santa Fe School and Verde Valley School but did not enter the world of art until ...

Article

Frederick J. Dockstader

Native American Navajo weaver. She began weaving as a young girl and in time matured into a master craftsman. In the 1990s she had ceased to weave, but enjoyed helping her daughter-in-law, Priscilla Taugelchee (b ?1950), with her work. Taugelchee capped a long career of developing her skills and those of others by demonstrating and lecturing throughout the US. Unlike many Navajo weavers, she dyed and spun her own yarn and rarely wove textiles of less than 110 yarn count. She was a master of the ...