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Lisa M. Binder

Ghanaian sculptor, active in Nigeria. He earned a bachelor’s degree in sculpture (1968) and a postgraduate diploma in art education from the University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana (1969). After graduation he taught at the Specialist Training College (now University of Winneba), Ghana, in a position vacated by the eminent sculptor Vincent Kofi. From ...

Article

A. E. Duffey

South African potter. He was educated at Heidelberg and Potchefstroom (both nr Johannesburg) and began a fine arts degree at the University of the Witwatersrand, which he left after two years to work for a four-year painting diploma at the Johannesburg School of Art. In ...

Article

Joanna Grabski

Senegalese glass painter, potter and teacher. She earned an MA in literature at the Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar (1980), then graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure d'Education Artistique (1983). Her early work in both literature and fine arts dealt with the social role of women in colonial Senegal. In the 1980s and 1990s, she worked primarily with glass painting or sous verre, a medium with a long history in Senegal. Her work advances well-known conventional glass paintings that depict colorful quotidian and religious scenes. She works with a palette of intense hues, applying them across the glass support so as to maximize the expressive potential of the medium. Although she created figural works in the 1980s, her work in the 1990s became increasingly abstract. Her glass paintings, such as ...

Article

Ghaybi  

Arab potter. The name is also applied to a pottery workshop active in Syria and Egypt in the mid-15th century. All the products are underglaze-painted in blue and black. A rectangular panel composed of six tiles decorated with a lobed niche in the mosque of Ghars al-Din al-Tawrizi, Damascus (...

Article

Will Rea

Nigerian potter. She was apprenticed to an aunt who taught her the traditional pottery techniques of the Gwali people, in which pots were made by the coil and pinch techniques and then given an open firing. The three basic shapes were the randa, a large water storage pot, the ...

Article

A. E. Duffey

South African potter of English birth. In 1959 he spent a year at the Brighton College of Art and then went to the St Martin’s School of Art in London. After qualifying in 1963 for a teaching diploma at London University, where one of his lecturers encouraged him to further his training, in ...

Article

English potter. He attended evening classes in pottery at the Camberwell School of Art, London (c. 1909–12). About 1915–16 he joined Cuthbert Hamilton at the Yeoman Pottery in Kensington, London (closed 1920). After World War I he set up his own pottery at the family engineering firm in Rotherhithe in ...

Article

Muslim  

Arab potter. Twenty complete or fragmentary lustreware vessels signed by Muslim are known. A fragmentary plate with birds in a floral scroll (Athens, Benaki Mus., 11122) is inscribed on the rim ‘[the work of] Muslim ibn al-Dahhan to please … Hassan Iqbal al-Hakimi’. Although the patron has not been identified, his epithet al-Hakimi suggests that he was a courtier of the Fatimid caliph al-Hakim (...

Article

Marla C. Berns

British ceramist of Kenyan birth. Odundo built an international reputation on the creation of rigorously beautiful and conceptually resonant vessel forms. She moved from Kenya to England in 1971 to continue her education, receiving her BA in 1976 from the West Surrey College of Art and Design and an MA in ...

Article

A. E. Duffey

South African potter. He qualified and worked as a chartered accountant until the outbreak of World War II. After five years’ military service in Europe, he worked as a clerk in Cape Town until 1956. He then went back to England and spent six months with ...