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Carol Magee

Zimbabwean sculptor. Bickle studied at Durban University and Rhodes University. She showed extensively in Zimbabwe in the 1980s and exhibited in India, Sweden and New Zealand in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Active in the arts in Bulawayo, she was a founding member of its Visual Artists’ Association. Her pieces are philosophical, both specifically in that she cites Foucault and Yourcenar, and generically in that they comment on the human condition: on hopes, dreams, conflicts and fantasies. Made of multiple manufactured and natural materials, her simple forms speak to complex situations, as seen in ...

Article

Miles Lewis

Australian architect. He was the first recipient of Melbourne University’s diploma in architecture, which had been instituted in 1906 but not brought immediately into operation: he completed the course in 1913 and the diploma was granted two years later. In 1916 he entered the office of American architect ...

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Anne Kirker

Australian painter, photographer and teacher. Binns trained as a painter at the National Art School, Sydney (1958–62) and held her first solo exhibition at Watters Gallery, Sydney in 1967. It comprised vividly coloured and decorative paintings, with explicit representations of female genitalia. This symbolic imagery predated a collective push by Australian women artists to produce work that they believed was inherently female. She initiated many community arts projects from the beginning of the 1970s and was an influential force in re-positioning women’s work. This took into account collaborative projects and a respect for amateur techniques and traditions that thrive outside the art world of metropolitan centres. Her community projects included ...

Article

Ian Keen

Australian Aboriginal painter. He was a leader of the Ngaladharr Djambarrpuyngu clan, Dhuwa moiety, who lived at Milingimbi mission (later Milingimbi township) for most of his adult life. His clan country was at Djarraya, Napier Peninsula, and the totemic ancestor to which he had particular affiliation was Ḏa:rrpa, King Brown Snake. According to Wells (pp. 229–30), Binyinyiwuy originally visited the mission only to raid the store or to ‘make havoc among the young women’, and he declared that he wanted nothing of white people or their ways. He was persuaded to settle when offered cash in return for bark paintings. He had a reputation among Yolngu of the Milingimbi region as a man of great knowledge. Together with his younger brother Djatijiwuy (...

Article

Bio Art  

Suzanne Anker

From Anatomical studies to landscape painting to the Biomorphism of Surrealism, the biological realm historically provided a significant resource for numerous artists. More recently, Bio Art became a term referring to intersecting domains that comprise advances in the biological sciences and their incorporation into the plastic arts. Of particular importance in works of Bio Art is to summon awareness of the ways in which the accelerating biomedical sciences alter social, ethical and cultural values in society....

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Ian North

Australian painter and printmaker. She worked in an undistinguished tonal Impressionist style following her studies at the South Australian School of Art and Crafts, Adelaide, from c. 1909 and from 1915 at Julian Ashton’s Sydney Art School. Between 1927 and 1929 she learnt a more modern style and philosophy at the Grosvenor School of Art, London, and ...

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Miles Lewis

Australian architect of English birth. He was employed in London as an inspector for the commissioners of sewers for Holborn and Finsbury, until his transportation to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania), with his wife and daughter in 1835, after forging a cheque. He was immediately employed in the Department of Roads and Bridges and was responsible for a great proportion of the colony’s road building, surveying and engineering work. When the department was merged into the Department of Public Works (...

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Valerie A. Clack

Australian architect, of English birth. He was the son of James Blacket, a London cloth merchant, and he initially worked in his father’s office and in a linen mill in Yorkshire before becoming a surveyor for the Stockton and Darlington Railway, where he must have obtained a knowledge of building. Blacket also sketched and measured old buildings in his spare time. In ...

Article

Terry Smith

Australian painter. An itinerant, largely self-taught young artist in the late 1940s, he was inspired by the depth of feeling of Picasso’s pink and blue periods, and by the Melbourne painters of the Angry Penguins group, especially their efforts to see intuitively and compose freely, as children might be supposed to do. In a profoundly disturbing series of drawings and paintings produced during the early 1950s, Blackman elaborated the theme of innocence within danger as thoroughly as any of his key sources of inspiration—William Blake, Giorgio De Chirico, Sidney Nolan and Joy Hester, and the Australian poet Shaw Neilson. The urban settings of such works seem especially threatening: in still factoryscapes, vacant lots and suburban streets empty of all but screaming billboards, schoolgirls walk, run, lie prone, even float, as if lost in the open desert. Deceptively simple, such paintings as ...

Article

Australian architect of English birth. He was probably no more than a master-builder’s assistant by 1785 when he was sentenced to transportation. In January 1788 he arrived with the first fleet in the new colony of New South Wales at Port Jackson, Sydney, and as an experienced brickmaker he was immediately put in charge of the brickworks at ...