1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • Modernism and International Style x
  • Nineteenth-Century Art x
  • Textiles and Embroidery x
Clear all

Article

Nele Bernheim

The term ‘Modernism’ is widely used, but rarely defined, to mean artistic currents responding to the social conditions of Modernity. While such applications occur in all the arts, fashion relates to these conditions in a particularly intimate way. In 1863 Charles Baudelaire defined modernity as ‘the ephemeral, the fugitive, the contingent, the half of art whose other half is the eternal and the immutable’. Few creations are as ephemeral and fugitive as a fashion intended to last a single season, and yet fashion itself is constant. Thus fashion design, one of the most intrinsically ephemeral of artistic practices, could be considered a quintessentially modern art. Further, the emergence of social modernity in cities such as Paris in the mid-19th century was accompanied by the development of the structure of the modern fashion industry. The ...

Article

Peg Weiss

Swiss artist, craftsman and teacher. After studying science and medicine at the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (1885–7), he travelled in England and Scotland in 1887. There the Arts and Crafts Movement influenced his decision to turn his attentions to the applied arts. Following brief studies at the Kunstgewerbeschule in Karlsruhe and an apprenticeship as a potter, his ceramics and furniture won gold medals at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in ...

Article

Donna Corbin

German designer, architect and painter. The son of a textile manufacturer, he studied painting at the Staatliche Kunstakademie in Munich (1888–90); he painted primarily at the beginning and end of his career, and he was a member of the Munich Secession. In 1895...

Article

Italian, 20th century, male.

Born 1878, in Murano (Venice); died 1947, in Venice.

Painter, tapestry maker, embroiderer, glassmaker, designer. Decorative panels, designs for mosaics.

Symbolism, Art Nouveau.

Vittorio Zecchin ran a tapestry and embroidery workshop before becoming artistic director of the glassworks founded by Cappellin and Venini. Zecchin's painting is close to the decorative approach of Art Nouveau, particularly as seen in the work of Klimt. Naturally figurative in style, it is very crowded and divided into numerous highly ornate planes, making use of both smooth monochromes and rich contrasting colours. The general overall impression is of a pronounced tendency towards orientalism. Even the subject matter of his inspiration adds to this feeling of exoticism. Noted works include the ...