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Sandra L. Tatman

American architectural competition held in 1922 by the Chicago Tribune newspaper for its new corporate headquarters. The competition changed American views of European modernism and the course of American Skyscraper architecture. The 1922 Chicago Tribune Competition’s call for competitors attracted more than 260 architects from 23 countries with the offer of a $50,000 prize for the winning design. Although the company may have issued this competition as a way of attracting attention to its newspaper, competitors from around the world, drawn by what was in ...

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Drury B. Alexander

American architect of Irish birth. According to family tradition, Clayton was taken to the USA by his recently widowed mother when he was a child. They settled in Cincinnati, OH, where Clayton, after serving in the US Navy, was listed in the city directory as a stone-carver. His architectural apprenticeship may have been with the firm of ...

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Kathleen Roy Cummings

American architect. He spent one year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before enrolling in the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, in 1877. He studied there until 1880 and was awarded a degree in 1881. Cobb worked first for the Boston architectural firm of ...

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Janet Adams

American architect and designer. His father was a founder of the New York Ecclesiological Society, giving Congdon a propitious beginning to his career as a preferred Episcopal church architect. In 1854 he graduated from Columbia College and was then apprenticed to John W. Priest (...

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Douglass Shand-Tucci

American architect and writer. Cram was the leading Gothic Revival architect in North America in the first half of the 20th century, at the head of an informal school known as the Boston Gothicists, who transformed American church design.

In 1881 Cram was apprenticed to the firm of ...

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William Dendy

Canadian architectural partnership formed in 1895 by Frank Darling (1850–1923) and John (Andrew) Pearson (1867–1940). Frank Darling’s career was founded in the Gothic Revival and conditioned by the ecclesiological inclinations of his father, the first cleric to introduce Anglican high church ritualism and fittings into Toronto. He studied for three years in London in ...

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Douglass Shand-Tucci

American architect and illustrator. In 1892–1913 he worked in partnership with Ralph Adams Cram, designing a remarkable series of Gothic Revival churches. His later work, in a variety of styles, culminated in the Nebraska State Capitol, a strikingly original design.

In 1884 Goodhue moved to New York, where he entered the office of ...

Article

Andrew Scott Dolkart

American architect. He was the son of a minister at New York’s prestigious Trinity Church. Throughout his career, Haight relied on his connections with Trinity and with New York’s Episcopal élite for major commissions. After serving in the Civil War, Haight studied with Emlen T. Littell (...

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Mark Alan Hewitt

American architect and campus planner. Klauder was the son of Louis Klauder, a German-born furniture manufacturer, and Anna Caroline Koehler. He trained as an apprentice under the architect Theophilus P. Chandler from the age of 15, furthering his studies at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art in Philadelphia. Between ...

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Malcolm Thurlby

Canadian architect. He was apprenticed to William Hay in Toronto, and when Hay left the city in 1862 Langley formed a practice with Hay’s former partner, Thomas Gundry. After Gundry’s death in 1869 he practised alone until 1873 when the firm Langley, Langley and Burke was formed with his brother, ...

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Douglass Shand-Tucci

American architect and writer. He moved to the USA from Ireland at the age of 18. After an apprenticeship to Edmund M. Wheelwright in Boston, he established his own office, also in Boston, at about the turn of the century with Timothy Walsh (1868–1934...

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Margaret Henderson Floyd

Architectural style popular from the 1870s until the early 20th century in England and the USA. Developing in reaction to the dogma of Gothic Revival, the style borrowed freely from the domestic architecture of the late 17th century and Queen Anne periods in England and the Netherlands. The style is characterized by asymmetrical plans, use of red brick and a combination of medieval and Classical motifs, such as oriel windows and Flemish gables together with pilasters and broken pediments. It was allied to progressive social attitudes and a desire to make good design available to all. The decorative arts were of great importance to the style, and domestic fittings contributed substantially to the desired aesthetic effect. In England the style ended in the hands of speculative builders and in the USA it merged into the Shingle style and the vernacular....

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Gail Fenske

American architect. He graduated from Yale University, New Haven, CT, with a degree in Fine Arts in 1889. He began his architectural career in the office of William Le Baron Jenney in Chicago. In 1893 he enrolled at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris and won medals in architecture and construction, graduating with honours in ...

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Alfred Willis

American family of architects, of German origin. Charles Julius Schweinfurth (b Reutlingen, Germany, 1827; d Cleveland, OH, 12 Oct 1909) trained as an engineer in Germany and moved to the USA, settling in Auburn, NY, in 1852. He was active there as a designer and manufacturer of architectural ornament, and he had four sons who all became architects. ...