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Article

Gordon Campbell

Ornamental glass shade for an oil lamp, designed to be hung in a mosque. It is usually shaped like a vase, with a bulbous body, a flared neck, a flat base, and applied glass loops from which it was suspended. The form emerged in late 13th-century Syria, and many of the finest examples come from Syria and Egypt. From the 16th century mosque lamps were made in Europe (notably Venice) and exported to the Islamic world....

Article

Situla  

Pippin Michelli

Bucket-shaped vessel, often used in a Christian context to contain holy water. Late Antique examples include two fine glass situlae in the treasury of S Marco, Venice: one, probably dating from the 4th century ad and made in Rome or Alexandria of purple glass, bears deeply carved Dionysiac figures; the other, perhaps of 6th- or 7th-century date, is decorated with hunting scenes. The most elaborate surviving situlae, however, are Ottonian. Made from a single piece of ivory and lavishly carved, these four examples range in height from 145 mm to 185 mm (Milan, Tesoro Duomo; Aachen, Domschatzkam.; London, V&A; New York, Cloisters). They are difficult to date precisely on grounds of style, inscription, or iconography, although they can be associated with Ottonian imperial circles....