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Shannen Hill

Apartheid, an Afrikaans word meaning ‘separateness’, was a system of racial segregation in South Africa that curtailed the economic, political, and social rights of black, coloured, and Indian people. Enforced through the legislation of the National Party, apartheid was the rule of the land between ...

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Hasan-Uddin Khan

English architect and writer, active in India . He graduated from the School of Architecture, Birmingham, and after serving as an anaesthetist in South-east Asia in World War II, he settled in India in 1945, first working as an architect/builder for a missionary organization in Pithorgarh, Uttar Pradesh, and from ...

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S. J. Vernoit

English historian of Indian art and culture. After growing up in India, he was sent to Britain at the age of seven to be educated, first in Plymouth, then at the Dollar Academy, Dollar, after which he studied medicine at Edinburgh University. In 1854 he joined the medical staff of the East India Company in Bombay and later held professorships of anatomy and physiology, and of botany and materia medica at the Grand Medical College there. His interest in Indian art developed when he became curator of the Government Central Museum in Bombay. He returned to Britain in ...

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S. J. Vernoit

English art historian, museum curator, educationalist, painter and collector. In 1899, after a short period of training as an archaeologist in Egypt, Brown went to India, where he served as curator of Lahore Museum and principal of the Mayo School of Art, Lahore. While working in these posts, he was also assistant director of the Delhi Exhibition of ...

Article

S. J. Vernoit

Scottish art historian, active in India. He was educated in Dumfries, Glasgow and Edinburgh, and he went to India in 1855 as professor of mathematics at Doveton College, Calcutta. In 1861 he became head of the Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy Parsee Benevolent Institution, Bombay, and here, in his spare time, he began his architectural and archaeological studies. In the years ...

Article

Anand Krishna

Indian art historian and museum director. During his upbringing he was exposed to many influences through his distinguished relatives and guardians: his family included Harish Chandra, known for his contribution to modern Hindu literature and as a social reformer and nationalist, and Rai Krishnadasa, who influenced Moti Chandra’s academic direction. After taking an MA degree in medieval Indian history at Banaras Hindu University, Chandra went in ...

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S. J. Vernoit

English museum curator and historian of Indian art. His childhood was spent in India and, after a period in England, he returned there during World War I. In 1925–6, he took up a position as professor of archaeology at the University of Cincinnati, OH. His interest in Indian art resulted in the publication in ...

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S. J. Vernoit

French art historian and archaeologist. He taught himself Sanskrit and Khmer while still at school and published his first article, on the early history of Cambodia, in 1904. He studied from 1911 at the Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient, becoming a research fellow in Indo-Chinese philology in ...

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Tapati Guha-Thakurta

Anglo-Sinhalese writer and curator, active also in India and the USA. More than those of any other scholar of Indian art, culture and aesthetics, Coomaraswamy’s vision and views have dominated and moulded the current understanding of Indian art. He began his career at the start of the 20th century as a champion of an aesthetic revaluation of Indian art. His powerful defence of Indian art and Eastern aesthetics was motivated, on the one hand, by a cultural nationalism that resented the intrusion of British colonial rule in India and Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and, on the other hand, by a utopian ideal of a medieval village civilization that rejected the materialism of the modern, industrial West. This ideal of an alternative socio-cultural order, discovered in traditional Sri Lanka and India, generated in time a more specific quest for an alternative aesthetic of Indian art. From the active mission of the cultural regeneration of Asia, Coomaraswamy retreated, with age, into the more aloof world of iconography, Eastern religions and metaphysics....

Article

E. Errington

British archaeologist, numismatist and engineer. He obtained an Indian cadetship in 1828 through the patronage of Sir Walter Scott and received his commission as Second Lieutenant, Bengal Engineers, in 1831. After training at Addiscombe and Chatham, he was sent to India in 1833. Friendship with James Prinsep encouraged an immediate interest in Indian antiquities and led to his excavation of the ...

Article

M. C. Subhadradis Diskul

Thai statesman, historian and educational administrator. The son of King Mongkut (Rama IV, reg 1851–68), he attained the rank of Major-General in the Military Operations Department before becoming (1890) Minister of Public Instruction, then (1892–1915) Minister of the Interior under his half-brother Chulalongkorn (Rama V, ...

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S. J. Vernoit

Austrian historian of Byzantine, Islamic and Indian art. He studied art history and archaeology at the universities of Vienna and Graz and in 1902 completed his doctorate at Graz under Josef Strzygowski and Wilhelm Gurlitt, a study of the paintings in a manuscript of Dioskurides’ ...

Article

French archaeologist and art historian. He studied in Paris at the Sorbonne, the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, the Institut d’Ethnologie and the Ecole du Louvre, and also at the Institut Français d’Amsterdam and the Institut Français de Berlin. His teachers included Sylvain Lévi, Alfred Foucher, ...

Article

Tapati Guha-Thakurta

British art historian, active in India. His interest in the study of architecture was formed and developed in India, where he went at an early age to join a merchant firm with which his family had connections. He left this mercantile establishment to begin his own indigo factory in Bengal, and in the course of his career as an indigo merchant began a pioneering survey of Indian architecture. Travelling extensively across India between ...

Article

French art historian and archaeologist. He became interested in the history of India and in Sanskrit literature while working at the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, and this led to his first publication, Lapidaires indiens. In 1898 he became Director of the new Mission Archéologique of Indochina in Saigon, later known as the Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient. In the following years he travelled throughout Indochina, organizing an inventory of historical monuments, establishing a library and a museum for the archaeological mission at Saigon, which was later transferred to Hanoi, and creating the ...

Article

French art historian and archaeologist. He qualified with an arts degree in 1888 and began postgraduate Sanskrit and Indian studies in 1891 at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Sorbonne University. His primary interest was in Buddhist legend and tradition, and the relationship between India and the Western Classical world. In ...

Article

Since the 1980s art markets have developed rapidly outside of Europe and the USA. In the so-called BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) this development has been particularly dynamic. With aggregate sales estimated at €11.5 billion, China is the second largest market for art and antiques in the world after the USA (McAndrew ...

Article

S. J. Vernoit

German art historian and museum director. He was educated at the Real-gymnasium in Munich and served in the military (1917–18). After World War I he took his doctorate at Munich University with a thesis, Kostüm und Mode an den indischen Fürstenhöfen der Grossmoghul Zeit...

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French art historian and museum curator. He was the Director of Arts and Curator of the National Museum of Phnom Penh in Cambodia and published several volumes on Khmer art, epigraphy and ethnography. He was killed by the invading Japanese forces in Phnom Penh in ...

Article

Austrian art historian, archaeologist and anthropologist. In 1923 he pioneered South-east Asian anthropology with the chapter ‘Südostasien’ in Georg Buschan’s Illustrierte Völkerkunde. He had also become interested by this time in South-east Asian art history and archaeology. During World War II he sought refuge at the American Museum of Natural History, New York. He was co-founder of the East Indies Institute of America (later known as the South-east Asia Institute) and a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Royal Asiatic Society and the Royal Anthropological Institute, as well as the Ecole Française d’Extrême-Orient. His research embraced such themes as the conceptions of state and kingship in South-east Asia, and cultural contacts and cultural change, including prehistoric migration and contacts across trade routes. As an art historian Heine-Geldern provided valuable information on old Javanese bronzes, South-east Asian sword handles and the archaeology and art of Sumatra and Nias. His writings showed an ability to handle both grand themes and minutiae....