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Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 1803, in New Germantown (New Jersey); died 1880, in Morristown (New Jersey).

Engraver (wood).

Joseph Alexander Adams worked for several years as a printer and then devoted himself to engraving on wood, which he initially studied alone. He later received advice from the engraver Alexander Anderson. He became a master and, with his pupils and collaborators, undertook the great work that made his reputation, ...

Article

Madeleine Fidell-Beaufort

American wood-engraver, art dealer, collector and philanthropist. Avery’s career as a wood-engraver and his involvement with the New York publishing trade began in the early 1840s. He worked for, among others, Appleton’s, the New York Herald and Harper’s and produced illustrations for trade cards, religious tracts, adventure stories and children’s books. By the early 1850s Avery had begun compiling humorous books and commissioning drawings from such artist-illustrators as ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 17 March 1822, in New York; died 11 August 1904, in New York.

Engraver.

When he became a publisher and art dealer in 1865, Samuel Putnam Avery completely gave up wood-engraving and confined himself to burin engraving.

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born 19th century, in Chariton (Iowa).

Illustrator.

Charles L. Bartholomew worked for the Minneapolis Journal and signed himself: Bart .

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Born 1874, in Carmel (Indiana); died 1943, in New York.

Draughtsman.

Franklin Booth was a student at the Westfield Quaker Academy, Indiana, and at the Art Institute of Chicago. He started out as a journalist and illustrator for the Indianapolis News...

Article

Elizabeth Meredith Dowling

American architect, preservationist, author, and editor. His wealthy patrician family provided the opportunity for a fine education and connections to future clients. In 1906 he received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Columbia University. His education continued in Rome at the American Academy through receipt of the McKim Fellowship in Architecture in ...

Article

American, 19th – 20th century, male.

Active in New York.

Painter (gouache), watercolourist, illustrator. Landscapes.

William Bradley collaborated on Collier's Weekly and other illustrated journals. A William Bradley exhibited portraits at the Royal Academy, the Suffolk Street Gallery and the New Water-Colour Society in London from 1872 to 1889...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born c. 1820, in Ireland; died January 1896, in New York City.

Photographer, publisher. Portraits, war scenes.

A pre-eminent portrait photographer in mid-nineteenth-century America, Mathew B. Brady claimed he was born in upstate New York, but census and draft registration records indicate he was born in Ireland. Thought to have arrived in New York City soon after the announcement of the daguerreotype process in 1839, he opened a gallery on Broadway in 1844. His daguerreotypes were used to model wood-engraved illustrations in the American edition of ...

Article

Judith Zilczer

Journal devoted to photography that was published from 1903 to 1917. Camera Work evolved from a quarterly journal of photography to become one of the most ground-breaking and influential periodicals in American cultural history. Founded in January 1903 by photographer Alfred Stieglitz as the official publication of the Photo-Secession, the journal originally promoted the cause of photography as a fine art. As Stieglitz, its editor and publisher, expanded the journal’s scope to include essays on aesthetics, literature, criticism and modern art, Camera Work fueled intellectual discourse in early 20th-century America....

Article

Merrill Halkerston

American painter, interior designer and writer. Colman grew up in New York, where his father, Samuel Colman, ran a successful publishing business. The family bookstore on Broadway, a popular meeting place for artists, offered Colman early introductions to such Hudson River school painters as Asher B(rown) Durand...

Article

Born 27 March 1813 in Roxbury, Massachusetts; died 1888 in New York City.

Lithographer, printer, publisher.

Currier & Ives (firm).

At the age of 15 Currier was apprenticed to the Boston lithographic firm of William S. & John Pendleton. In 1833 he worked for the engraver and printer M.E.D. Brown in Philadelphia before going to New York and publishing his own lithographs in ...

Article

American, 19th–20th century, male.

Born 23 July 1864, in South Dedham, Massachusetts; died 2 November 1933, in Norwood, Massachusetts.

Photographer, publisher. Portraits, nude studies, religious and mythological subjects.

The Linked Ring.

Pictorialism.

During the 1880s F. Holland Day worked for A.S. Barnes and Company booksellers in Boston and began experimenting with the camera. In 1893 he established, along with Herbert Copeland, the Copeland and Day publishing house, and over the course of the decade his photographic work flourished. In 1896 he began making pictures of male nudes, often highly accessorized and posed, and also pursued religious themes, culminating in 1898 with a series of 250 photographs of Day performing the life of Christ. Following this controversial pursuit, he organized a major exhibition of Pictorialist photography, ...

Article

Henry Adams

Mexican illustrator, writer, gallery owner, and publisher, active in the USA. He was the son of a wealthy Mexican lawyer and publisher. De Zayas started his career as an artist by providing drawings for his father’s newspaper in Veracruz. In 1906 he moved on to Mexico City’s leading newspaper, ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Active at the beginning of the 19th century.

Draughtsman, painter.

Franz Frühbeck is known for his drawn and painted journal of the journey he made in 1817 and 1818 through Brazil. This is now in the possession of the Hispanic Society of America in Philadelphia, and was reproduced, edited by R.C. Smith and G. Ferrez, in ...

Article

Laura Suffield

American typographer, printer and graphic designer. He demonstrated his interest in letter forms when a child, cutting out 3000 in paper. While working as a clerk in Boston, he discovered the Kelmscott Press. In 1895 Goudy founded the Booklet Press, a small printing shop, later renamed the ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Engraver.

A. Halbert was probably a pupil of J.F.E. Prudhomme and engraved portraits and vignettes for the publishers Harpers Bros. and Rawdon, Wright and Hatch.

Article

Gordon Campbell

English calico printer, active in America. He was the son of a draper, and trained as a calico printer at Talwin and Foster, a textile printworks at Bromley Hall (Middx). He was assisted by Benjamin Franklin to emigrate, and in 1774 sailed to Philadelphia, where he opened a calico factory in the Kensington area. He printed material for dresses, handkerchiefs and furnishing fabrics, notably bedspreads with medallions depicting urns (e.g. Philadelphia, PA, Mus. A. and Winterthur, DE, Du Pont Winterthur Mus.). When Hewson retired in ...

Article

E. A. Christensen

American designer. He was initially a successful salesman for the Illinois-based Weller’s Practical Soaps. He settled in East Aurora, near Buffalo, NY, and abandoned selling soap in 1893. During a trip to England the following year, he met William Morris and admired the works of his Kelmscott Press. On returning to East Aurora, Hubbard employed his great showmanship to popularize a simplified version of English ...

Article

American, 19th–20th century, male.

Born 4 April 1843, in Keeseville, New York; died 30 June 1942, in New York City.

Photographer, painter. Landscapes.

William Henry Jackson began his career in 1858 as a retoucher in a photography studio in Troy, New York, and soon moved on to a studio in Rutland, Vermont. Jackson enlisted in the Union Army in ...

Article

American, 19th century, male.

Born March 1797 or 1799, in Philadelphia; died 8 November 1865, in Dorchester (Massachusetts).

Engraver, draughtsman.

David Claypoole Johnston engraved some portraits and book illustrations for publishers. He became famous mainly for etchings of caricatures which he produced for the collection ...