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Oscar P. Fitzgerald

American cabinetmaker of Scottish birth. He trained as a cabinetmaker in Edinburgh and London. In 1763 he arrived in Philadelphia on the same boat as John Penn, the new Governor of Pennsylvania and a future client, to join Quaker friends. He opened a shop on Union Street and eventually moved to Second Street in the Society Hill area. He made stylish mahogany furniture (sold ...

Article

Husk  

Gordon Campbell

Ornamental motif consisting of repeated or diminishing elements that resemble a husk of wheat. It often appears on the furniture of Robert Adam and George Hepplewhite, and is characteristic of Neo-classical furniture in England and America.

Article

Donna Corbin

American cabinetmaker of French birth. Lannuier received his training from his brother, Nicolas-Louis-Cyrille Lannuier, who was admitted to the Corporation des Menuisiers-Ebénistes in Paris on 23 July 1783. Charles-Honoré arrived in the USA in 1803 and settled in New York where he established a workshop at 60 Broad Street, an address he would occupy for his entire career. He was a contemporary and rival of Duncan Phyfe and became one of the pre-eminent furnituremakers in the USA working in the Late Federal period. His craftsmanship was of the highest quality, and he counted among his customers such distinguished New York families as the ...

Article

John A. Fleming

Canadian cabinetmaker and upholsterer of Scottish birth. He arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick, in 1813 and set up a workshop on Prince William Street where he was active until 1848. Working in the Anglo-American Neo-classical and later Empire styles, Nisbet soon had an operation that employed specialized carvers and turners and supplied other cabinetmakers with piecework. Nisbet’s documented furniture, mainly sofas, sideboards and tables, has certain specific characteristics: spiral- or rope-turned legs, carved fans, pronounced two-ring turnings at the base of legs, ebonized grooves and acanthus-leaf carving (e.g. table, ...

Article

Oscar P. Fitzgerald

American cabinetmaker of Scottish birth. He immigrated to America with his family about 1784 and settled in Albany, NY, where he served his apprenticeship. About 1792 he moved to New York and opened his own shop; his business prospered, and he moved to a new location on Partition Street (now Fulton Street). As his reputation spread, the most fashionable people in the city, including wealthy New York merchants ...