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Article

Annemarie Weyl Carr

German scholar of Byzantine, East Christian and European illuminated manuscripts. He took his degree in 1933 at the University of Hamburg in the heady community of the Warburg Library (later Institute) under the tutelage of Erwin Panofsky and Fritz Saxl. Immigrating with the Warburg staff and library to London in ...

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Joseph R. Kopta

American architectural historian. Conant was the leading 20th-century American architectural historian specializing in Romanesque architecture, and was the primary archaeologist of the monastic complex at Cluny. He earned his degrees from Harvard, including a BA in Fine Arts in 1915, an MArch. in 1919, and a PhD with a dissertation on the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, supervised by ...

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Douglass Shand-Tucci

American architect and writer. Cram was the leading Gothic Revival architect in North America in the first half of the 20th century, at the head of an informal school known as the Boston Gothicists, who transformed American church design.

In 1881 Cram was apprenticed to the firm of ...

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Adam S. Cohen and Shirin Fozi

American art historian. Deshman attended the University of Chicago as an undergraduate before training with Kurt Weitzmann at Princeton University, where he received his PhD in 1970 for a dissertation on the Benedictional of St Aethelwold, a manuscript that occupied him for his entire career. This project was published as a book in ...

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Paul Crossley

American art historian. He first trained as an architect but, in his early thirties, he turned to the study of art history and in 1911 submitted his doctoral dissertation at Munich University on 15th-century stained glass in southern Germany. Under the influence of his teacher, ...

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Joanna Cannon

American art historian. He made a fundamental contribution to the study of medieval Italian painting. His pioneering work mapped out an area of art-historical study through the highly ordered publication of a large body of new or little-known material.

Coming to art history after a business career, Garrison took an MA at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York, in ...

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Paul Williamson

American collector and art historian. He was a man of private means who travelled widely before settling in London in 1912. Initially trained as a scientist, he turned to the arts and from the beginning of the 20th century was an avid collector with wide-ranging interests and was one of the greatest benefactors of the ...

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Scholarly organization in New York dedicated to the promotion and study of medieval art. In 1956 the International Center of Romanesque Art (ICRA) was founded in New York as the US committee of the Centre international d’Etudes romanes (CIER). Renamed in 1966 as the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA), it has been headquartered at The Cloisters in New York City since ...

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Jacqueline Colliss Harvey

German art historian, active in America. He graduated from the Justus-Liebig-Universität, Giessen, in 1924 and was awarded a DPhil. from the Universität Hamburg in 1933. His teaching career in Hamburg ended when he was interned in a concentration camp after he voiced his humanitarian objections to the activities of the Nazis. On his release in ...

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W. Eugene Kleinbauer

German art historian of late antiquity, Byzantium and Norman Sicily, active also in the USA. Kitzinger was a prominent medievalist who went to Rome in 1931 to begin doctoral work in medieval art history under the supervision of Wilhelm Pinder. Within three years he earned his PhD at the University of Munich. His dissertation, ...

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(). American writer. He taught English at Columbia University, New York, from 1919 to 1958, and became professor there in 1947. He devoted a lifetime’s research to tracing the origins of the legends of King Arthur, and to proving that they had their roots in Celtic mythology and were passed to the Continent by Breton and other story-tellers. Loomis also pursued an interest in art and art history; many of his early publications dealt with aspects of medieval Arthurian iconography, and it was this art-historical research that led him to postulate the Celtic origins of the legends. He continued, where relevant, to use his knowledge of medieval art to support his arguments. His ...

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Edith W. Kirsch

American art historian. He was educated at the universities of Princeton (BA) and New York (MA, PhD), lecturing at the latter from 1931 to 1933. He subsequently became Lecturer and finally Professor of Fine Arts and Archaeology at Columbia University (1934–53); Professor as well as Curator of Paintings at the Fogg Museum, Harvard University (...

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Lawrence E. Butler

American art historian. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1899 and received his MA in Classics there in 1900. After three years in Rome as a fellow in the American School of Classical Studies, he moved to Princeton University, joining the Department of Art and Archaeology in ...

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Michael Podro and Margaret Barlow

German art historian, active in the USA. He wrote primarily on late medieval and Renaissance art in northern Europe and Italy, mostly, but by no means exclusively, on painting.

Panofsky’s doctoral dissertation (1915) was on the relation of Dürer’s theory of art to that in Renaissance Italy; in ...

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Jacqueline Colliss Harvey

American archaeologist, writer, and art historian. He graduated from Yale (BA, 1904), the fourth in his class, and subsequently claimed he was ‘too well prepared’ for college. From 1904 to 1906 he studied at the School of Architecture, Columbia University, and then spent the next five years studying and travelling in Europe. His first book, ...

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American art historian, critic, and teacher of Lithuanian birth. An archetypal Jewish émigré, he arrived in the USA at the age of three. In 1920 he entered Columbia College, New York, where, having concluded that he would never succeed as a practising artist, he studied languages, mathematics, literature, anthropology, philosophy, and art history. He received his BA in art history and philosophy in ...

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Patrick Le Chanu

French museum curator and art historian, active also in the USA. In 1925 he left Poland for Paris, where he studied under Henri Focillon before joining the curatorial staff of the Louvre, at first unpaid, in 1930. Apart from the war years, which he spent at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, he remained at the Louvre until ...

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Andrew N. Palmer and J. van Ginkel

American archaeologist and art historian. He gained BSc and MFA degrees in architecture from Princeton University (NJ) in 1925 and 1928 respectively and practised as an architect in New York from 1929 to 1931. In 1931–4 he travelled in Greece, developing his knowledge of its Classical and medieval monuments. He returned to Princeton in ...

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Andrew N. Palmer and J. van Ginkel

American art historian of German birth. He studied at the universities of Münster, Würzburg, and Vienna and gained his doctorate from Berlin University. A grant from the German Archaeological Institute enabled him to study in Greece in 1931, and he remained an associate of the Institute until ...

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Lawrence E. Butler

American archaeologist and Byzantinist . Whittemore studied English literature at Tufts College, graduating in 1894, and then took graduate classes at Harvard. He taught English at Tufts from his graduation in 1894 until 1911, and from 1902 to 1903 included topics in ancient and medieval art; he taught both English and fine arts at Columbia University summer school in ...