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Juliana Nedeva-Wegener

He graduated in architecture from the Technische Hochschule, Berlin, in 1920. On returning to Bulgaria he formed a practice with Ivan Danchov (1898–1972). Belkovski espoused the revival of Neo-classicism that was prevalent in much of Europe in the 1930s and actively resisted the modernist trends of Functionalism and Constructivism. Notable examples of his collaboration with Danchov in Sofia are the Bulgaria Hotel and Concert Hall (...

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Christian Norberg-Schulz

Norwegian architectural and furniture design partnership formed in 1922 by Gudolf Blakstad (b Gjerpen, 19 May 1893; d Oslo, 1986) and Herman Munthe-Kaas (b Christiania [now Oslo], 25 May 1890; d Oslo, 5 March 1970). Blakstad was awarded his diploma as an architect at the Norwegian Institute of Technology in Trondheim in ...

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Italian architect and engineer. He studied in Pavia and then at the Politecnico in Turin, where he qualified as an engineer (1867). He also studied architecture under Camillo Boito at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera, Milan. Among his early designs were the classical octagonal marble fountain (...

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American architectural partnership formed in 1903 by William A(dams) Delano (b New York, 21 Jan 1874; d New York, 12 Jan 1960) and Chester H. Aldrich (b Providence, RI, 4 June 1871; d Rome, 26 Dec 1940). Aldrich graduated from Columbia University, New York, in ...

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Nicholas Bullock

Austrian architect, furniture designer and teacher. He trained first in Linz and from 1909 at the Technische Hochschule, Vienna, under the Neo-classicist Karl König (1841–1915). He completed a year in Josef Hoffmann’s studio at the Wagnerschule in 1913–14, and after World War I he returned to work with Hoffmann, rising to be his senior assistant and helping with the development of the ...

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German architect and writer. He attended the Kunstakademie, Kassel (1873), and the Bauakademie, Berlin (1874–9), where his teachers included Johann Heinrich Strack and Richard Lucae, and he won the Schinkel prize. In 1879 he took the government examination in architecture and became a government architect (...

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Lisbet Balslev Jørgensen

Danish architect, painter and teacher. After technical school and apprenticeship to a bricklayer, he attended the School of Architecture of the Kongelige Danske Kunstakademi in Copenhagen in 1873. He was taught by Hans Jørgen Holm, an advocate of a national style based on the free use of historically associative elements, and Ferdinand ...

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Nils-Ole Lund

Danish architect. He trained at the Kunstakademi in Copenhagen, graduating in 1921. His early buildings of the 1920s were neo-classical in style, but by the beginning of the 1930s he had become a leading exponent of Functionalism. Lauritzen successfully combined the latter with a refined use of materials and detailing, designing Functionalist buildings that were both elegant and intimate in scale. Such qualities were apparent in his airport building on Amager, outside Copenhagen (...

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Asko Salokorpi

Finnish architect. He studied architecture (1884–8) at the Polytechnic Institute, Helsinki, and with F. A. Sjöström (1840–85), an architect who designed several important Neo-classical buildings in Helsinki and elsewhere in Finland. Sjöström’s influence is clearly evident in Lindqvist’s student projects and early independent designs. His first important work, the Merkurius Building (...

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Louise Noelle

Mexican family of architects. Nicolás Mariscal (b Mexico City, 10 Sept 1875; d Mexico City, 13 April 1964) and his brother Federico Mariscal (b Querétaro, 1881; d Mexico City, 19 Aug 1969) both received a Neo-classical architectural education at the Academia Nacional de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, graduating in ...

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John Wilton-Ely

Term coined in the 1880s to denote the last stage of the classical tradition in architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts. Neo-classicism was the successor to Rococo in the second half of the 18th century and was itself superseded by various historicist styles in the first half of the 19th century. It formed an integral part of ...

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Lisbet Balslev Jørgensen

Danish architect. After attending technical school and serving an apprenticeship as a carpenter, he was admitted to the Arkitektskole of the Kunstakademi in Copenhagen (1896), but he left in protest at the teaching (1902) to work independently. At an exhibition in ...

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József Sisa

Hungarian architect, painter and interior designer of German descent. He studied in Karlsruhe and Vienna, and in 1868 he went to Budapest where he worked first in the offices of Antal Szkalnitzky and Miklós Ybl. His designs included the sepulchral monument (1871–2) of ...

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Jørgen Sestoft

Danish architect. His early works showed a mastery of both domestic building traditions and large-scale Neo-classicism, seen for example in the development plan for the disused railway station area in Copenhagen (1920). After this he led the movement away from classicism with a series of projects in which stylistic motifs were toned down without loss of unity or purity of form, for example Øregård Gymnasium (Secondary School; ...

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Despina Stratigakos

German architect. Winkelmann was the first woman to complete an architectural curriculum at a German institute of technology and the first woman to open an architectural firm in Germany. Her interest in architecture was awakened by her grandfather, who owned a building firm in Aken and under whose tutelage she began her training. When she applied to the architecture programme at the Königliche Technische Hochschule in Hannover, she had already designed houses as well as agricultural and industrial buildings in Aken. Despite her qualifications, as a woman she was not permitted to matriculate, but instead studied as an auditor from ...

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Alexander Koutamanis

German architect, designer and archaeologist, active in Greece. He studied at the Königliche Bauschule in Dresden (1855–8) and worked for Theophilus Hansen in Vienna (1858–9). Hansen brought Ziller to Greece to execute the Academy of Athens (1861–4). After an educational journey in Italy and further studies at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna (...