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Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Arita  

Hiroko Nishida

Region in Japan, now part of Saga Prefecture, and the name of a type of porcelain first produced there during the early Edo period (1600–1868). The ware was originally known as Imari yaki (‘Imari ware’) because it was shipped from the port of Imari (Saga Prefect.). During the Meiji period (...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Western name for Chinese porcelain of the Kangxi period (1662–1722) imported by Dutch merchants through the Dutch trading station at Batavia (now Jakarta). This porcelain, which was brown-glazed, decorated with panels and usually painted in blue, was imitated by European manufacturers, notably at Meissen and Leeds, and these imitations are known as Batavia ware....

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Elizabeth Adams

English ceramic manufactory. The first Bow patent for ‘a certain material whereby a ware might be made … equal to … China or Porcelain ware imported from abroad’ was taken out in east London in December 1744 by the Irish artist Thomas Frye (c....

Article

Roger S. Edmundson

English ceramic manufactory. Production at the Salopian China Manufactory on the Caughley estate, near Ironbridge, Salop, was started in 1775 by Thomas Turner (1749–1809), a Freeman of Worcester, and Ambrose Gallimore (fl c. 1749–c. 1787), who was active at the estate and may already have been directing potting there. They were encouraged by the availability of coal on site and the proximity of the Severn waterway to Worcester and Bristol as potential markets. ...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese potter. He is thought to have been the grandson of Chinese immigrants who came to Japan to escape the turbulence at the end of the Ming period (1368–1644). He was adopted into the Okuda family of wealthy pawnbrokers, who patronized the Buddhist temple Kenninji, where, according to one account, Eisen lodged for a time. The temple was famous as a centre of Chinese learning, and it was probably this contact that stimulated Eisen’s first attempts at making Chinese-style ceramics. By the 1780s he was producing copies of late Ming-period enamelled porcelain called ...

Article

Hagi  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. High-fired Hagi ware was manufactured from the early 17th century in Nagato Province (now Yamaguchi Prefect.; see Japan, §IX, 3, (ii)). The first Hagi potters, the brothers Yi Suk-wang and Yi Kyŏng (Jap. Sakamoto Sukehachi), were brought to Japan from Korea during ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Chinese porcelain made for export to the West in the 18th century. The monochrome decorations depicted Christian subjects such as the nativity and crucifixion. There is no evidence that the porcelain was commissioned by the Jesuits, but the European engravings on which the decorations were based may have been brought to China by Jesuit missionaries....

Article

Regina Krahl

Town and county seat in north-east Jiangxi Province, China, and the country’s main centre of porcelain production. For most of its existence the town was part of Fouliang, in Raozhou Prefecture, and in historical records its ceramics are generally referred to as Raozhou ware. With a continuous history of manufacturing porcelain from the Tang period (...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese porcelain made in the Arita district of Hizen Province (now Saga Prefect.). Sakaida Kinzaemon (later Kakiemon; 1596–1666) is traditionally credited with making the first porcelain in Japan in 1643 at the family kiln in Nangawara, but recent archaeological excavations have shown that ‘Kakiemon’ wares were widely produced in the region during the early Edo period (...

Article

Karatsu  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. High-fired ceramic ware was manufactured from the late 16th century in kilns (119 identified by 1986) located in and around present-day Karatsu (Kyushu, Hizen Prov., now Saga Prefect.). Geographical and historical circumstances destined Karatsu to be the meeting-place of the advanced ceramic technology of Chosŏn-period (...

Article

Kenzan  

Japanese, 17th – 18th century, male.

Born 1663, in Kyoto Prefecture; died 1743.

Potter, painter.

Kenzan was the brother of Korin Ogata, the great Edo painter (1658-1716), and became known first as a ceramicist. He and Ninsei Nonomura introduced a new form of richly decorated ceramic art, which was very successful in the Genroku period (...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese family of ceramicists. They were active in Kyoto. The first-generation head, Kinkōzan Gen’emon, established a kiln at Awataguchi in the Shōhō era (1644–8). At first the family produced utilitarian objects, but later they made teabowls for the tea ceremony (chadō), particularly of the type known as ...

Article

Kutani  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. Porcelain was produced from the mid-17th century at Kutani (now in Ishikawa Prefect.). The term Old Kutani (Ko Kutani) is frequently applied to what has long been believed to be the earliest wares, typically large porcelain dishes decorated with bold designs in overglaze enamels, with green, purple and yellow predominating (...

Article

Mokubei  

Japanese, 18th – 19th century, male.

Born 1767, in Kyoto; died 1833, in Kyoto.

Painter, potter.

Mokubei was a potter as well as a painter and a lover of illuminated art. An aesthetic intellectual evolving within an intellectual elite steeped in Chinese culture, he was the elder son of a patron of a restaurant or brothel in Kyoto. He was attracted to the arts at a very young age and left his father’s household aged 15....

Article

Kōzō Sasaki and Hiroko Nishida

Japanese potter, painter and scholar. He was born into the Kiya family of restaurateurs and adopted the surname Aoki only after becoming a painter. Mokubei, one of his many artist’s names, was created by combining the Chinese characters for ‘tree’ and ‘rice’ (a character anagram of his given name Yasohachi). His most familiar studio name (...

Article

Satsuma  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan. Although best known in the West for their enamelled porcelains (see Japan, §IX, 3, (iii)), kilns in Satsuma Province (now Kagoshima Prefect.) first produced stonewares for the tea ceremony and for household use, made by Korean potters brought to Japan after Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s invasions of Korea in ...

Article

Seto  

Richard L. Wilson

Centre of ceramics production in Japan, near Nagoya (Aichi Prefect.). The area occupies an important place in Japanese ceramic history, because, together with neighbouring Mino, it was the only ceramics centre to produce glazed ware before the Momoyama period (1568–1600). Its importance as a producer of utilitarian wares in the early modern period is reflected in the word ...

Article

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production, in the foothills flanking the Daido River valley in south-west Ōmi Province (now Shiga Prefect.). Together with Seto, Echizen, Tanba, Bizen and Tokoname, Shigaraki is one of Japan’s oldest continuously functioning traditional pottery centres (see Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)...