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Article

Sophie Page

Astrology is the art of predicting events on earth as well as human character and disposition from the movements of the planets and fixed stars. Medieval astrology encompassed both general concepts of celestial influence, and the technical art of making predictions with horoscopes, symbolic maps of the heavens at particular moments and places constructed from astronomical information. The scientific foundations of the art were developed in ancient Greece, largely lost in early medieval Europe and recovered by the Latin West from Arabic sources in the 12th and 13th centuries. Late medieval astrological images were successfully Christianized and were adapted to particular contexts, acquired local meanings and changed over time....

Article

Partha Mitter

Indian painter. Sunyani belonged to the aristocratic Tagore family family of Calcutta that had led the literary and artistic Renaissance in Bengal in the 19th century. She was the niece of the great poet Rabindranath Tagore and her brother Abanindranath, who had inspired her, was leader of the nationalist art movement in India known as the Bengal school. The first woman artist of India to gain public recognition, she was included in the exhibition of the Society of Oriental Art held in Calcutta in ...

Article

Bohemian School, 17th century, male.

Active in Prague.

Draughtsman.

Brother Electus produced drawings of holy sites in Palestine. They were engraved on copper by D. Wussin.

Article

Filippo Pedrocco

Italian painter. After the death of his father in 1545, he was brought up by his maternal grandparents, from whom he derived the surname India. He is sometimes referred to as India il vecchio (‘the elder’) to distinguish him from his nephew Tullio India. He was trained in the workshop of ...

Article

Israeli painter of Polish birth. He first began to draw in 1947 after seeing the Renaissance and Baroque works in the Alte Pinakothek in Munich. He emigrated to Israel in 1948 and in 1953 and 1955 attended the summer art courses held at Kibbutz Na’an under ...

Article

Danish draughtsman, engraver, woodcut designer, painter, architect, surveyor and author. Facts about his highly productive career, which ranged from Denmark to Turkey, come primarily from an autobiographical letter of 1 January 1563 (free English trans. in Fischer, 1990) to King Frederick II of Denmark to whom he owed allegiance by birth; also from inscribed works, his letters and mostly unpublished material in archives in Vienna, Hamburg, Antwerp and Copenhagen....

Article

Mani  

Indian, 17th century, male.

Painter.

Mani probably lived around 1600. He belongs to the group of artists working under the Emperor Akbar the Great (1556-1605) and his son Jahangir.

Article

Michael Curschmann

The medieval term mappa mundi (also forma mundi, historia/istoire) covers a broad array of maps of the world of which roughly 1100 survive. These have resisted systematic classification, but the clearly dominant type is one that aims at comprehensively symbolistic representation. Its early, schematic form is a disc composed of three continents surrounded and separated from one another by water (“T-O Map”) and associated with the three sons of Noah: Asia (Shem) occupies all of the upper half, Europe (Japhet) to the left and Africa (Ham) to the right share the lower half. Quadripartite cartographic schemes included the antipodes as a fourth continent, but the tripartite model was adopted by the large majority of the more developed world maps in use from the 11th century on and—with important variations—well into the Renaissance. While details were added as available space permitted, the Mediterranean continued to serve as the vertical axis and, with diminishing clarity, the rivers Don and Nile as the horizontal one. The map also continues to be ‘oriented’ towards Asia, where paradise sits at the very top. A circular ocean forms the perimeter and not infrequently the city of Jerusalem constitutes its centre....

Article

Indian, 17th century, male.

Painter.

Mir Kalan was an artist at the court of Jahangir.

Article

Indian, 17th century, male.

Active during the first half of the 17th century.

Painter.

Modi was a painter in the school of artists around Jahangir.

Article

Spanish, 17th century, male.

Painter.

The Filipino college in Alcalá de Henares has a number of works by Diego Pérez Mexia and his Portrait of a Dominican is in the Altenburg museum.

Article

Flemish School, 17th century, male.

Born 1637, in Bruges; died after 1672, in Bruges.

Painter. Landscapes.

Nicolaes Ryckx was the pupil of Van der Kabel. He returned home in 1664, after a period in Palestine, and was a member of the guild at Bruges in ...

Article

Tang di  

Chinese, 14th century, male.

Born 1296, in Wuxing (Zhejiang); died c. 1364.

Painter.

Tang Di was an official and renowned Confucian scholar who took part in the renaissance of Northern School painting initiated by Zhao Mengfu (1254-1364). Although a disciple of Zhao Mengfu, Tang Di also worked in the style of Guo Xi (...

Article

Diana Gisolfi

Italian painter. According to Vasari, he was taught by Giorgione. He moved from Venice to Verona around 1500 and was certainly trained in the workshop of Liberale da Verona. In 1514 he is recorded as living with the noble Giusti family in Verona. The Portrait of a Young Man with a Rose...