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Article

Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom

Lebanese–American artist and writer. Daughter of a Greek Christian mother and a Syrian Muslim father, she was educated in Lebanon and at universities in France and the United States. For many years she taught the philosophy of art at Dominican College, San Rafael, CA. She also lectured and taught at many other colleges and universities until her retirement in the late 1970s. Also a novelist and poet, she combined Arabic calligraphy with modern language in her drawings, paintings, ceramics and tapestries. She explored the relationship between word and image in over 200 “artist books,” in which she transcribed in her own hand Arabic poetry from a variety of sources....

Article

Agano  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese region in Buzen Province (now part of Fukuoka Prefect.), northern Kyushu, where stonewares were manufactured at various sites from c. 1600 (see also Japan, §IX, 3, (i), (d)).

The first potter to make Agano ware was the Korean master Chon’gye (Jap. Sonkai; ...

Article

Iraqi, 20th century, male.

Active in England since 1976.

Born 1939, in Baghdad.

Painter, potter, illustrator. Designs for tapes­tries.

Dhia Azzaoui initially studied archaeology. He then went on to study at Baghdad’s school of fine art. He has lived and worked in London since 1976...

Article

Hélène Guéné-Loyer

French ceramics manufacturer. He was initially a physics and chemistry teacher and in 1889 visited the Exposition Universelle in Paris, where he saw Chinese porcelain with opaque glazes that enhanced the ground colours and emphasized the forms of the body. He transferred this technique to stoneware, a less expensive material that has the advantage of being able to withstand great variations of temperature when fired. In this way, with one type of ceramic body, it is possible to vary the degree to which enamels are fused in order to obtain dull, oily or crystalline finishes in the greatest possible variation of colours....

Article

Bizen  

Richard L. Wilson

Japanese centre of ceramics production. High-fired ceramic wares were manufactured from the end of the 12th century in and around the village of Inbe, Bizen Province (now Okayama Prefect.). This region had been a centre for manufacturing Sue-style stonewares and Haji-style earthenwares from the 6th century ...

Article

Lillian B. Miller

American businessman, collector, patron and dealer. He began collecting art in 1869 with paintings by American Hudson River school artists and conventional European works, Chinese porcelain, antique pottery and 17th- and 18th-century English furniture. By 1883 his taste had focused entirely on American works, especially on paintings by ...

Article

Dutch, 20th century, female.

Born 1931, in Indonesia.

Sculptor, potter.

Lies Cosijn lived and worked in Amsterdam, where she was a pupil at the school of applied arts. She began exhibiting in 1957, notably at the Institut Néerlandais in Paris in 1958, in Amsterdam in ...

Article

French, 20th century, male.

Active in France and Lebanon.

Born 1881, in Montgeron; died 1964.

Painter, watercolourist, ceramicist. Interiors with figures, landscapes, waterscapes, harbour scenes, harbour views, seascapes, still-lifes. Designs for mosaics and stained-glass windows.

Georges Albert Cyr became a painter on the advice of Guillaumin. He exhibited his works at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris from 1921. He also exhibited at the Salon d'Automne in Paris, and became a member of the society associated with it. Personal problems led him to leave France in 1934 with the intention of travelling in the Near and Far East. After spending a few weeks in Beirut, he decided to settle there and found accommodation by the sea. His studio soon became a meeting place for Lebanese artists, including Shafik Abboud, and also served as a school of art where he gave lessons in painting and art history. He also published critical essays....

Article

S. J. Vernoit

English collector. The eldest son of a Greek merchant, Eumorfopoulos worked for the merchant firm of Ralli Brothers. He initially collected European porcelains and Japanese tea bowls but then turned to Chinese objects, which became his largest collection, emphasizing pottery and porcelains. His second interest was metalwork, and he formed a fine collection of Chinese bronzes; he was also interested in other media, such as jade. He chose items based on his aesthetic response rather than archaeological or rarity value, and he thus placed himself at the forefront of Western taste for Chinese art. From ...

Article

Gordon Campbell

Finnish ceramic and glass designer. In 1945 he joined Arabia porcelain factory, where he dispensed with the notion of the china set in favour of mix and match tableware. His best known series was ‘Kilta’ (designed in 1948, sold from 1953 and relaunched in 1981...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Born c. 1894, in Takatsu; died 5 January 1977, in Mashiko, near Tokyo.

Ceramicist.

Hamada Shoji originally wanted to become a painter, but after visiting an exhibition of works by Tomimoto Kenkichi, decided to become a ceramist. He began studying at the technical college in Tokyo in ...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter and museum official. In 1916 he graduated from the department of ceramics at the Tokyo Technical College. He then entered the Kyoto Municipal Institute of Ceramics, where he worked with Kanjirō Kawai, who was his senior there. In 1920 he went to England with ...

Article

Richard Cork

English painter, designer, ceramicist and sculptor. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art between 1899 and 1903, where Wyndham Lewis was a fellow student, and then taught art at Clifton College (1907–10). It seems that Hamilton was in sympathy with avant-garde developments since he was involved ...

Article

Regina Krahl

Town and county seat in north-east Jiangxi Province, China, and the country’s main centre of porcelain production. For most of its existence the town was part of Fouliang, in Raozhou Prefecture, and in historical records its ceramics are generally referred to as Raozhou ware. With a continuous history of manufacturing porcelain from the Tang period (...

Article

Hiroko Nishida

Japanese porcelain made in the Arita district of Hizen Province (now Saga Prefect.). Sakaida Kinzaemon (later Kakiemon; 1596–1666) is traditionally credited with making the first porcelain in Japan in 1643 at the family kiln in Nangawara, but recent archaeological excavations have shown that ‘Kakiemon’ wares were widely produced in the region during the early Edo period (...

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter. In 1914 he graduated from the department of ceramics of the Tokyo Technical College and researched such subjects as glazes at the Kyoto Municipal Institute of Ceramics. In 1920 he obtained a climbing kiln (noborigama), the Shōkeiyō, with eight chambers, at Gojōzaka in Kyoto. In the following year he made his début with technically skilled works imitating the classical wares of China and Korea, for which he gained immediate prominence. In ...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Born 1883, in Kyoto; died 1959.

Painter, calligrapher, potter.

Rosanjin grew up in an adoptive family after being abandoned by his mother. When he was only ten, he discovered the art of calligraphy and was deeply impressed. On being turned down by the Kyoto Municipal Art School he taught himself virtually on his own, mastering the arts of calligraphy and engraving by the age of 20. In 1915, after completing various calligraphic works in Tokyo, he travelled abroad, going to China and Korea. He returned to Kanazawa to study ceramics under Suda Seika for two years. In 1917 he settled in Kita-Kamakura as a ceramic artist. He only travelled to the West once, in 1954, for the exhibition of his work in Europe and the USA. For eleven years, Rosanjin worked in close collaboration with the owners of Tokyo’s most renowned restaurant, making all the ceramic wares used in the establishment. His work defies categorisation; he touched on many disciplines in many styles....

Article

Mitsuhiko Hasebe

Japanese potter, calligrapher and medallist. At an early age he taught himself seal-carving and calligraphy, for which he won a prize in 1904; soon after he became a commercial calligrapher and medallist. In 1915 he had his first experience of decorating pottery at a kiln in the district of Hokuriku. In ...

Article

Japanese, 20th century, male.

Active in the USA since 1965.

Born 1931, in Okayama Prefecture.

Print artist, sculptor.

Yasuhide Kobashi graduated from the ceramics department of Kyoto Art School in 1955, but had already started to paint and make woodcuts. He won the 1954 Newcomer’s Prize at the National Painting Academy’s exhibition and would win it again in ...

Article

Ellen Paul Denker

American ceramic factory. Homer Laughlin first produced white ironstone in 1873 with his brother Shakespeare, as Laughlin Brothers. The partnership was dissolved in 1877, and Homer Laughlin established the Homer Laughlin China Co. Semi-vitreous dinnerware made for hotels was added as a major product in the 1890s, and in ...